Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Freemason' keyword pg.1 of 2
13 OCTOBER 2008

The Steps of Freemasonry

"American Freemasonry resembles two sets of stairs that begin and end together, as the enlarged chart of Masonic structure shows. A Mason's first step is to become an Entered Apprentice. He climbs to the third step where most Masons stay. If he wants to go on in Masonic heirarchy, he enters either the Scottish or York Rites. Many authorities say the Scottish Rite was begun by Scots emigrés in France; the York Rite is named after York, England where, by legend, the first Masonic body was organized.

In the Scottish Rite a Mason climbs 30 steps, or degrees. The name he takes on at each degree is written on each step in the chart (and listed below the chart). Where there are two names the top is used by northern Masons, the italicized one by southern Masons (only northern names are listed below the chart). Some figures a Mason meets in Rite ceremonies stand on the steps (from bottom): King Solomon, King Cyrus, acolyte, George Washington, Sultan. Each degree teaches a moral. To earn a degree a candidate learns the moral and participates in a ceremony dramatizing it. A 32 ° is the highest degree a Mason can earn. The 33 ° is awarded by the Supreme Council, ruling body of the Rite.

A Mason in the York Rite advances 10 degrees, known by name and not by degree number. On the chart are figures he meets at each degree or the degree symbol. Figures are: temple workman, Past Master (Virtual), Israel tribesman, High Priest of Jews, King Hiram of Tyre, Knight of Malta, Knight Templar, equal in prestige to 33 ° in Scottish Rite.

Under the Arch are organizations allied to Freemasonry. Master Masons are eligible for Grotto and Tall Cedars of Lebanon. Girls with a Mason in the family can join Job's Daughters or Rainbow Girls; women, the Eastern Star; boys, DeMolay. Only 32 ° Masons or Knights Templar can join the Shrine. A Shriner's wife can be a Daughter of the Nile.

Most important of the many Masonic symbols are the open Bible with square and compass on it (left); Solomon's temple (below Bible); and the 'G' with the all–seeing eye inside (upper right). In the United States the 'G' stands for God."
(Matawan Lodge No. 192, 2008)

1

TAGS

authoritative historyfreemason • freemason symbols • freemasonry • mason • masonic symbols • Matawan Lodge • monotheismmorality • rite • ritualSolomonstepssymbolism

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 JANUARY 2004

Freemason: Emergence Of Autonomous Realm Of Individuals

Kevin Hetherington
In Habermas' account the puritan household provided modern society with its moral order, a moral order which was to shape male individuals into both accumulators of capital and moral agents within this public sphere. In the private sphere, in the patriarchal space of the home, men learned to relate reasoning skills to their economic interests, but at this point in time they were unable to develop those interests effectively because institutional power was still largely in the hands of the monarch and the landed aristocracy. By creating a public sphere outside of the household and autonomous from the already existing public authorities centred around the monarch and the court, civil society, Habermas suggests, emerged as an autonomous realm of individuals. Habermas argues that the main arenas for this public sphere were the seventeenth–century coffee–houses in London, the eighteenth–century salons prominent in France and the table societies in Germany. While the court retained some influence in terms of public displays of civility, the formal, status–bound types of interaction associated with it gave way to a more informal atmosphere that had less regard for status and rank. These new institutions were to be found in the towns, and became counter–sites to the court.

1

TAGS

coffee-houses • freemasonheterotopiaJurgen HabermasKevin Hetherington • monarch • moralorder • puritan • salons • society
20 JANUARY 2004

Freemason: Secular Architect Shaping The World

"Freemasonry was founded around the image of the secular architect shaping the world and himself within it so as to provide both with a sense of moral order. Stonemasons, forerunners of modern architects, not only provided the symbolic tools :this reshaping process, but because of their past, particularly their association with the building of the great cathedrals in Europe, supplied the link with religious certainty and order. But it was the building of Solomon's Temple which was the central myth of freemasonry. It embodied spatially a utopic of moral order in which individuals might lead a virtuous life and come to create the social conditions of trust required in the contractual society that was emerging around them. Freemasons devoted considerable energy to seeking out their origins of their craft in the ancient world, notably associated with the great feats of architecture down the ages. Freemasons were imputed to have been involved in almost every architectural feat in history, right back to Noah and his ark and including on the way the construction of Solomon's Temple and the Tower of Babel."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.87)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

20 JANUARY 2004

Utopic Representations of an Orderly Society

"Freemasonry during this period [early eighteenth century] was tolerant, enlightened, generally secular yet morally aware, and concerned with issues to do with scientific discovery. This science was used to legitimate a vision of social order as based in natural order. Freemasonry provided not only a vehicle for the scientists to lecture and socialize; it also offered the means through which these economic and political interests might find common support. It played a part in the civilizing of civil society. Newtonian science not only provided legitimacy through the symbolism of masonry for a higher, morally regulated, perfectible society, but also the means through which perfection might be achieved. The lodges were utopic representations of an orderly society by which self–interested bourgeois individuals might be shaped into moral subjects not only through their veneration of the symbolic order found in both nature and architecture, and their acceptance of rank and hierarchy, but also through their own freedom as moral subject sand as part of a group that perceived itself as a moral elect. Through such means the unhewn stranger could be shaped into a trustworthy brother. Such a process could not but help promote the development of the shared political and economic interests that we have all come to associate with freemasonry in more recent times."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.88)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

20 JANUARY 2004

Freemason: Solomon's Temple - Classical Order

"The strongest symbol of that classical order was to be found in the biblical story of the building of Solomon's Temple. As the embodiment of natural wisdom, the symbol of Solomon's Temple held secrets in its design. The invented tradition and history that centred on architecture and the building of Solomon's Temple not only offered freemasons a sense of being part of a select group with access to some of the secrets of the ancients but also, I would argue, allowed them to see themselves as a moral elect, able to act as a vanguard of moral agents in the emerging public sphere of the period."

(Kevin Hetherington, 1997, p.88)

Hetherington, K. (1997). "The Badlands Of Modernity: Heterotopia And Social Ordering". London: Routledge.

Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.