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18 DECEMBER 2013

Imperial College London: Personalised Healthcare

"Many pharmaceuticals have idiosyncratic action when administered. The concept that healthcare solutions can be tailored to the individual is one that is attractive as it potentially allows a better match of patient and drug.

Identifying signatures indicative of treatment outcome are key to personalising medicine. Top–down systems biology offers an opportunity to help predict drug efficiacy and avoid adverse reactions.

Providing optimised healthcare on an individual basis will benefit both patients and clinicians through improved drug choice, efficacy and reduced costs. From the work we have conducted using large scales molecular epidemiology studies using metabolic phenotyping, it is clearer than ever before that a one–size–fits–all solution to drug therapy is not a sustainable or desirable model. Given the diversity of human biochemistry, such phenotypes are important in personalising medicine as they provide clues as to the influences of a variety of factors including underlying genetics, environmental stress, nutritional status and gut microbial activity."

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TAGS

biological diversityclinical medicine • Computational and Systems Medicine (CSM) • digital health • drug choice • drug efficiacy • drug therapy • environmental stress • epidemiology • evidence-based healthcare • gene signature • genetic signatures of diseases • gut microbial activity • healthcare research • healthcare solutions • human biochemistry • human health • idiosyncrasies • idiosyncratic action • individualised healthcare • interdisciplinary research • metabolic phenotyping • molecular epidemiology • molecular epidemiology studies • nutritional status • one-size-fits-all solution • optimised healthcare • patient carepersonalised healthcare • personalising medicine • pharmaceutical drugs • pharmaceuticals • phenotypes • primary healthcare research • scientific research • systems biology approaches • translational medicine • translational science • underlying genetics • wellbeing

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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