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31 MARCH 2013

Qualitative research primarily is inductive in its procedures

"qualitative inquiry is inductive and often iterative in that the evaluator may go through repeated cycles of data collection and analysis to generate hypotheses inductively from the data. These hypotheses, in turn, need to be tested by further data collection and analysis. The researcher starts with a broad research question, such as 'What effects will information systems engendered by reforms in the UK's National Health Service have on relative power and status among clinical and administrative staff in a teaching hospital?' [48].The researcher narrows the study by continually posing increasingly specific questions and attempting to answer them through data already collected and through new data collected for that purpose. These questions cannot all be anticipated in advance. As the evaluator starts to see patterns, or discovers behavior that seems difficult to understand, new questions arise. The process is one of generating hypotheses and explanations from the data, testing them, and modifying them accordingly. New hypotheses may require new data, and, consequently, potential changes in the research design."

(Bonnie Kaplan and Joseph A. Maxwell, p.38, 2005)

Kaplan, B. and J. Maxwell (2005). Qualitative Research Methods for Evaluating Computer Information Systems. Evaluating the Organizational Impact of Healthcare Information Systems. J. Anderson and C. Aydin. New York, Springer: 30–55.

TAGS

Bonnie Kaplandata analysisdata collectiondata collection and analysis • generating explanations • generating hypotheses • hypothesishypothesis testinginductive enquiryinductive proceduresinductive reasoningiterative cycleJoseph Maxwellpatterns of meaning • qualitative enquiry • qualitative researchresearch designresearch questionresearcher • specific questions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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