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11 AUGUST 2012

Kevin Kelly: screen culture is a world of constant flux

"Screen culture is a world of constant flux, of endless sound bites, quick cuts and half–baked ideas. It is a flow of gossip tidbits, news headlines and floating first impressions. Notions don't stand alone but are massively interlinked to everything else; truth is not delivered by authors and authorities but is assembled by the audience. Screen culture is fast, like a 30–sec. movie trailer, and as liquid and open–ended as a website. ...

On a screen, words move, meld into pictures, change color and perhaps even meaning. Sometimes there are no words at all, only pictures or diagrams or glyphs that may be deciphered into multiple meanings. This is terribly unnerving to any civilization based on text logic."

(Kevin Kelly, 19 June 2000, "Will We Still Turn Pages", Time Magazine)

Fig.1 JasKaitlin "hypermediacy" taken on April 25, 2010 using an Apple iPhone 3GS [http://www.flickr.com/photos/64776338@N07/5996281055/].

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TAGS

200021st centuryaudienceauthorised voiceauthorityauthorshipbook • classic logic of books • cohesive narratives • constant flux • credibilitycultural change • double screening • dual screening • endlessly tweakable • fast action • first impressions • flowfragmentaryfragmentation • framing narrative • gossiphalf-baked ideashypermediacyinformation in contextinterconnectedness • interlinked • Kevin Kellyliquid • meanings change • multi-tabbing • multiple meanings • narrative framingnon-linearopen-ended • people of the book • people of the screen • quick cutsreflexive modernityscreen culturesensemakingsound bitesynthesise knowledge • text logic • tidbitsTime Magazine • traditional narratives • turning pages • various contexts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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