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29 OCTOBER 2010

Integrative Education: education proceeds from the interests of students rather than from disciplined subject matter

"As early as 1918, Kilpatrick elaborated a 'project method,' in which education proceeded from the interests of students rather than from disciplined subject matter. In the 1930s, thirty schools participated in a long–term experiment with integrative education called the 'Eight–Year Study.' Although this study documented the benefits of integrative education, the study had little impact on the traditional structure of education (Daniel L. Kain 1993). In spite of its shortcomings, the practice of breaking down instruction into separate academic disciplines has seldom been challenged.

While integrative education is not new, current supporters offer proof of its wisdom by pointing to recent research that indicates information is most securely encoded and best retrieved by the brain when it can be connected to a web of meaning. Jane Roland Martin (1995) argues that integrative education allows curricula to educate through the experiences of diverse races, genders, and classes, thus creating a place of significance for each child."

(Dean Walker, ERIC Digest 101 January 1995)

TAGS

19181930s • curricula • curriculum • Daniel L. Kain • educationeducation reform • Eight-Year Study • experience • fused curriculum • holistic approachinformation in contextintegrated curriculum • integrated learning systems • integration • integrative education • interdisciplinaryinterdisciplinary approacheslearningpedagogy • post disciplinary • post-disciplineproject methodsensemakingsocial construction of knowledgestudent-centredteachingteaching methodsways of thinking • web of meaning • William H. Kilpatrick

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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