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What's new on Folksonomy? pg.2 of 799
29 OCTOBER 2017

Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times

"Appropriation, first of all, is a common technique. People appropriate when they make things their own and integrate them into their way of life, by buying or stealing commodities, acquiring knowledge, claiming places as theirs and so on. Artists appropriate when they adopt imagery, concepts and ways of making art other artists have used at other times to adapt these artistic means to their own interests, or when they take objects, images or practices from popular (or foreign) cultures and restage them within the context of their work to either enrich or erode conventional definitions of what an artwork can be. As such, this technique could be described as comparatively timeless, or at least, as being practiced as long as modern society exists. For, ever since labour was divided and the abstract organization of social life alienated people from the way in which they would want to live, appropriation has been a practice of getting back from society what it takes from its members. At the same time, appropriation can be understood as one of the most basic procedures of modern art production and education. To cite, copy and modify exemplary works from art history is the model for developing art practice (neo)classicist tendencies have always championed. During the last two centuries this model was repeatedly challenged by advocates of the belief that modern individuals should produce radically new art by virture of their spontaneous creativity. The postmodern critics of this cult of individual genius in turn claimed that it is a gross ideological distortion to portray the making of art as a heroic act of original creation. Instead they advanced the paradigm of appropriation as a materialist model that describes art production as the gradual re-shuffling of a basic set of cultural terms through their strategical re-use and eventual transformation."

(Jan Verwoert, 2007)

ART&RESEARCH: A Journal of Ideas, Contexts and Methods, Volume 1. No. 2. Summer 2007, ISSN 1752-6388

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TAGS

2007 • acquiring knowledge • adopting concepts • adopting imagery • adopting ways of making art • appropriation practicesArt and Research (journal)art historyart practice • artistic appropriation • artistic meansartworkauthor as geniusauthorshipcitationcite • common creative technique • copy and modify • copy-and-paste culturecopying of artistic works • Craig Owens • creative genius • creative technique • cult of individual genius • cult of the author • Douglas Crimp • exemplary works • expropriation • Frederic Jameson • genial creatorgenius myth • heroic act • ideological distortion • Jan Verwoert • making of art • materialist model • modern art • modern art education • modern art production • neoclassicist tendencies • nothing is original • original creation • pastiche • postmodern critics • radically new art • Robert Longoromantic notion of the artist • spontaneous creativity

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 OCTOBER 2017

Tribes: DISCWOMAN

"The 12-minute documentary ... follows the three co-founders of DISCWOMAN, a New York-based female DJ collective and booking agency, as they share their perspectives on the role women have played within electronic music. ... Also celebrated in the documentary are the shared views of world-renowned female-DJs such as Black Madonna, Nicole Moudaber, Star Eyes, Sandunes, Demian Licht, and Nina Sonik."

(PR Newswire, 8 March 2016)

TAGS

2016 • all-female line-up • Black Madonna • Christine Tran • Daphne Oram • Demian Licht • Discwoman • DJ • DJ Haram • DJs Umfang • documentary • documentary short • electronic music • electronic music culture • Emma Burgess-Olson • feminist music artist • Frankie Hutchinson • music culture • New York City • Nicole Moudaber • Nina Sonik • Sandunes • short documentary • Smirnoff Sound Collective • Star Eyes • Tygapaw • Volvox • women in electronic music culture • women of colour

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 OCTOBER 2017

Shimon Tzabar: Israel should get out of the occupied territories

"Our right to defend ourselves from extermination does not give us the right to oppress others. Occupation entails foreign rule. Foreign rule entails resistance. Resistance entails repression. Repression entails terror and counter-terror. The victims of terror are mostly innocent people. Holding on to the occupied territories will turn us into a nation of murderers and murder victims. Let us get out of the occupied territories immediately."

(Shimon Tzabar, 22 September 1967, Ha'aretz)

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TAGS

1967autonomy • Betar • British Mandate Palestine • counter-terror • extermination • foreign rule • Haaretz • Haganah • illegal settlement • Irgun • Israeli • Israeli state • Jewish HolocaustJewish settlers • Menachem Begin • Naomi Tzabar • nationhoodoccupied territoriesoccupied territoryoccupying poweroppression • pacifist • painterPalestinian territories • Palestinian-Jewish bi-national state • poetprogressive political change • provocative advertisement • renaissance man • repression • resistance during the Mandate • resistance movement • right-wing Zionist youth movement • satirist • Shimon Tzabar • sovereignty • Stern Gang • subjugationTel Avivterrorterrorism • terrorist group • terroristswriterZionist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 OCTOBER 2017

Media and Interpellation

"Many theorists have taken Althusser's notion of ideology and interpellation, shifted the focus away from the state, and applied it to various kinds of media texts. In this vein, cultural theorists such as Max Horkheimer and Theodor Adorno have argued that the homogeneity of mass media interpellate passive subjects who desire reoccurring tropes and predictable story lines which only serve to further stultify them (1979). 5 They are particularly sympathetic to those exploited in capitalist society, lamenting how 'capitalist production so confines them, body and soul, that they fall helpless victim to what is offered them.' (Adorno and Horkheimer, 1979:8). Yet the common people's acquiesce to the culture industry only perpetuates their conditions, and Adorno and Horkheimer proceed to argue, 'immovably, they insist on the very ideology which enslaves them. The misplaced love of the common people for the wrong which is done them is a greater force than the cunning of the authorities' (Adorno and Horkheimer, 1979:8). Like Althusser, Adorno and Horkheimer argue that the proletariat submit to ideologies that interpellate them as passive, and thus comply with their own domination. Similarly, David Gauntlett describes how 'interpellation occurs when a person connects with a media text: when we enjoy a magazine or TV show, for example, this uncritical consumption means that the text has interpellated us into a certain set of assumptions, and caused us to tacitly accept a particular approach to the world.' (Gauntlett, 2002: 27). Here, Gauntlett seems to echo Adorno and Horkheimer's argument that media consumers unquestioningly accept a medium's subject positioning of them as passive viewers."

(Cindy Nguyen, The Chicago School of Media Theory)

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TAGS

acquiesce • capitalist machinery • capitalist production • capitalist society • Chicago School of Media Theory • common people • cultural theorists • culture industry • David Gauntlett • domination • helpless victim • homogeneity of mass media • ideologiesideologyinterpellationLouis Althusser • manipulative media techniques • mass media homogeneity • mass media manipulation • Max Horkheimer • media consumers • media textpassive consumption • passive subjects • passive viewers • predictable story lines • proletariat • reoccurring tropes • stultify • subjugationTheodor Adorno • uncritical consumption • unquestioningly accept

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 OCTOBER 2017

Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy

"Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy conducts an in-depth investigation into the long and complex evolution of style in the study of rhetoric and writing. The theories, research methods, and pedagogies covered here offer a conception of style as more than decoration or correctness—views that are still prevalent in many college settings as well as in public discourse. The book begins by tracing origins of style in sophistic-era Greece, moving from there to alternative and non-Western rhetorical traditions, showing style as always inventive and even at times subversive. Although devalued in subsequent periods, including the twentieth century, contemporary views now urge for renewed attention to the scholarly and pedagogical possibilities of style as experimentation and risk, rather than as safety and conformity. These contemporary views include work in areas of rhetoric and composition, such as basic writing, language difference, digital and multimodal discourse, feminist rhetorics, and rhetorical grammar. Later chapters in this book also explore a variety of disciplines and research methods—sociolinguistics and dialectology, literary and rhetorical stylistics, discourse and conversation analysis, and World Englishes. Finally, teachers and students will appreciate a final chapter that explains practical teaching methods, provides ideas for assignments and activities, and surveys textbooks that promote a rhetorical stance toward style."

(Brian Ray, 2015)

Ray, B. (2015). Style: An Introduction to History, Theory, Research, and Pedagogy, Parlor Press.

TAGS

2015 • American stylistics • analysing style • basic writing • Brian Ray • Chris Holcomb • Classical rhetoric • composition analysis • content analysis • conversation analysis • cultural forms • dialectology • digital discourse • digital rhetoric • discourse analysis • discourse and conversation analysis • Elizabeth Closs Traugott • European stylistics • feminist rhetorics • Gayatri Spivak • genre analysis • H G Widdoseon • Jeanne Fahnestock • Jimmie Killingsworth • Judith Butler • language difference • language patterns • linguistic criticism • linguistics • literary and rhetorical stylistics • literature • Mary Louise Pratt • multimodal discourse • non-Western rhetorical traditions • Patricia Sullivan • patterns of language • Paul Butler • practical stylistics • public discourse • research methods • rhetoric analysis • rhetoric and writing • rhetorical analysis • rhetorical grammar • rhetorical stance • ritualisations of language • Roger Fowler • Ronald Carter • Sara Mill • social discourse • sociolinguistics • sociolinguists • sophistic-era Greece • stylistic analysis • stylistics • Susan Peck MacDonald • T R Johnson • Tara Lockhart • Terry Eagleton • thematic analysis • Tom Pace • Walter Nash • World Englishes

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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