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25 JUNE 2015

What is the Cut-Up Method?

"The writer Ken Hollings examines how an artistic device called the 'cut-up' has been employed by artists and satirists to create new meanings from pre-existing recorded words.

Today's digital age has allowed multi-media satirists like Cassetteboy to mock politicians and TV celebrities online by re-editing - or cutting up - their broadcast words. But the roots of this technique go back to the early days of the avant-garde. The intention has always been to amuse, to surprise, and to question.

The founder of the Dadaist movement, the poet Tristan Tzara, proposed in 1920 that a poem could be created simply by pulling random words cut from a newspaper out of a hat. And it was this idea of the random juxtaposition of text, of creating new meanings from pre-existing material, that so appealed to the painter Brion Gysin in the late 1950s when he and his friend, the American writer William S Burroughs, began applying the technique not just to text but to other media too - including words recorded on tape."

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1920absurdist humour • Alan Sugar • Armando Iannucci • artistic device • avant-garde experimental technique • BBC Radio 1 • BBC Radio 4Brion Gysin • broadcast news • Cassetteboy • Chris Morris • Coldcut (duo) • cut-upcut-up techniqueDada movement • Dan Shepherd • Doug Kahn • George W Bush • Julie Andrews • juxtaposition • Ken Hollings • Kevin Foakes (aka DJ Food) • Lenka Clayton • Matt Black • mocking • Negativland • Pierre Schaeffer • pulled out of the hat • random juxtaposition • random words • re-editre-purposeRonald Reagan • sound-poetry • State of the Union • tape cut-up • Tristan TzaraVicki BennettWalter RuttmannWilliam Burroughs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2015

i-Docs: website of this emerging interactive documentary form

"You will find a number of definitions and points-of-view on what constitutes an interactive documentary. At this point in the development of this fast-moving field we feel that it is important to have an expansive definition that can embrace the many different kinds of work that are emerging. The i-Docs site includes coverage of projects that you may find elsewhere described as web-docs, transmedia documentaries, serious games, cross-platform docs, locative docs, docu-games, pervasive media. For us any project that starts with an intention to document the 'real' and that does so by using digital interactive technology can be considered an i-doc. What unites all these projects is this intersection between digital interactive technology and documentary practice. Where these two things come together, the audience become active agents within documentary – making the work unfold through their interaction and often contributing content. If documentary is about telling stories about our shared world; we are interested in what happens as the audience get more closely involved in this way. At the heart of i-Docs is the question; what opportunities emerge as documentary becomes something that is co-created?"

(Digital Cultures Research Centre at University of the West of England)

TAGS

2011 • active agents • active audienceBristolco-creator-ship • cross-platform docs • design for the screen • Digital Cultures Research Centre • digital storytelling • docu-games • docufiction • document the real • documentary form • documentary practice • documentary truthhybrid formshypermedia • i-Docs • i-Docs project • interactive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive multimediainteractive storytelling • Jon Dovey • Judith Aston • locative docs • online multimedia • our shared world • pervasive media • Sandra Gaudenzi • serious gamestheir stories • transmedia documentaries • University of the West of England • UWE Bristol • web-based documentary • web-docs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 JUNE 2015

Moritz Stefaner: Selfiecity

Moritz Stefaner speaking about his work on the Selfiecity.net project (part 2) at the 'Visualized' conference in New York, 6-7 February 2014.

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2014 • Alise Tifentale • amateur cultural production • Amazon Mechanical Turk • BangkokBerlinbig databrowsing interfacecitiescognitive sciencecultural artefactscultural specificity • Daniel Goddemeyer • data abstraction • data filtering • data visualisation • design collaboration • design conferencedigital humanities • Dominikus Baur • faceface recognitionfaces of peoplefacial analysisfacial compositefiltering • human activity • information aestheticsinformation visualisationInstagram • Jay Chow • Lev Manovich • mass selfie • Mehrdad Yazdani • Moritz Stefaner • Moscow • Nadav Hochman • new media artNew Yorkportrait photographSan PaoloselfieSelfiecity (2014)social media projecttelematicsTokyo • University of Applied Sciences Potsdam • University of Osnabrueck • video lecturevisualising dataVisualized conference

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
23 JUNE 2015

Illuminating North Korea by photojournalist David Guttenfelder

Fig.1 "Illuminating North Korea", photographs and video by David Guttenfelder, 10 June 2015, The New York Times.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JUNE 2015

The Last Guardian: a game about the relationship between a boy and a giant griffin-like monster

"When the Japanese game designer Fumito Ueda was a child, he loved to capture and care for wild animals. He was obsessed with the way they moved; and later as a young game designer he imported a copy of the Amiga classic Lemmings, seeing in it something other than a colourful puzzler. 'I sensed life on the TV screen for the first time in my life,' he said.

Since then, he has become famous for games that explore humanity and companionship. After joining Sony Japan's development studio in 1997, he oversaw two of the most fascinating and beautiful action adventures of the PlayStation 2 era: Ico and Shadow of the Colossus. These doleful, reflective titles, with their hazy visuals and vast silences, showed us new ways to tell stories and invoke emotions through games. The moment in Ico where the eponymous lead character takes the hand of Yorda, the princess he seeks to rescue from an evil queen, has become one of the great images of the medium.

But then, after the wonderful Shadow of the Colossus – a game that brought themes of loss, grief and the fundamental importance of friendship to the standard monster hunting archetype – came the wilderness years. A game codenamed Project Trico, about the relationship between a boy and a giant griffin-like monster, was mentioned, and then officially announced as The Last Guardian at E3 in 2009. Then years of uncertainty as the project shifted from PS3 to PS4, and Ueda announced his separation from Sony Japan.

Six years later at E3 2015, Sony began its hugely nostalgic press conference with a revelation: The Last Guardian was definitely in production for PS4. We now know that it is a joint project between Sony Japan and a new studio, Gen Design, formed by members of Ueda's old Team Ico group. The release date is a tentative 2016. There is still much work to be done. But you get the feeling that Sony Computer Entertainment chief Shuhei Yoshida, always a fan of Ueda's work, will do whatever it takes to push this through. It is happening."

(Keith Stuart, Friday 19 June 2015)

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2016action-adventureadventure game • animal companion • atmospheric presenceboycompanion character • companionship • E3Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3)environment as antagonist • epic minimalism • fantasy character • fantasy games • friendship • Fumito Ueda • game designer • Gen Design • giant griffin • grief • griffin • griffon • gryphon • hazy visuals • humanity • Ico (2001) • invoke emotions through games • legendary creaturelossmonster • monster hunting archetype • mythological beingPlaystation 2 • Project Trico • PS3 • PS4 • Shadow of the Colossus (2006) • Shuhei Yoshida • Sony Computer Entertainment • Sony Japan • tell stories through games • The Last Guardian • treacherous landscapevideogame • wild anima

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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