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Which clippings match 'Texture' keyword pg.1 of 2
10 JUNE 2015

PomPom Mirror: a camera-based interaction artwork

"Rozin's anthropomorphic PomPom Mirror features a synchronized array of 928 spherical faux fur puffs. Organized into a three-dimensional grid of beige and black, the sculpture is controlled by hundreds of motors that build silhouettes of viewers using computer-vision. Along its surface, figures appear as fluffy animal-like representations within the picture plane, which is made permeable by a 'push-pull' forward and backward motion of meshed 'pixels'. Ghostly traces fade and emerge, as the motorized composition hums in unified movement, seemingly alive and breathing as a body of its own."

Daniel Rozin, "PomPom Mirror", 2015, 928 faux fur pom poms, 464 motors, control electronics, video camera, custom software, microcontroller, wooden armature, 48 x 48 x 18 in / 121.9 x 121.9 x 45.7 cm

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2015aesthetic experienceaesthetic spectacleanalogue correspondenceanthropomorphismartwork • beige and black • Bitforms Gallery • black and whitecamera-based interactioncomputer based interactive artcomputer visionDaniel Rozindynamic visual representationdynamically changing • fade and emerge • faux fur • fur • ghostly traces • image processing • implied tactile experience • implied texture • interactive artinteractive artworkinteractive visualisationkinetic art • mechanical mirror • microcontrollermicrosoft kinect cameramirror • moving tiles • NYCperceptual organisation • physical pixels • pom pom • PomPom Mirror (2015) • puff • push-pull • real-time motion • surface quality • synchronised array • tessellationtexturetransposing materials • unified movement • Victoria Sendra • visual appearance • visual feedback

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 APRIL 2012

Pictures Under Glass: sacrificing tactile richness

"As it happens, designing Future Interfaces For The Future used to be my line of work. I had the opportunity to design with real working prototypes, not green screens and After Effects, so there certainly are some interactions in the video which I'm a little skeptical of, given that I've actually tried them and the animators presumably haven't. But that's not my problem with the video.

My problem is the opposite, really – this vision, from an interaction perspective, is not visionary. It's a timid increment from the status quo, and the status quo, from an interaction perspective, is actually rather terrible. ...

I'm going to talk about that neglected third factor, human capabilities. What people can do. Because if a tool isn't designed to be used by a person, it can't be a very good tool, right? ...

Do you see what everyone is interacting with? The central component of this Interactive Future? It's there in every photo! That's right! – HANDS. And that's great! I think hands are fantastic! Hands do two things. They are two utterly amazing things, and you rely on them every moment of the day, and most Future Interaction Concepts completely ignore both of them. Hands feel things, and hands manipulate things.

Go ahead and pick up a book. Open it up to some page. Notice how you know where you are in the book by the distribution of weight in each hand, and the thickness of the page stacks between your fingers. Turn a page, and notice how you would know if you grabbed two pages together, by how they would slip apart when you rub them against each other.

Go ahead and pick up a glass of water. Take a sip. Notice how you know how much water is left, by how the weight shifts in response to you tipping it.

Almost every object in the world offers this sort of feedback. It's so taken for granted that we're usually not even aware of it. Take a moment to pick up the objects around you. Use them as you normally would, and sense their tactile response – their texture, pliability, temperature; their distribution of weight; their edges, curves, and ridges; how they respond in your hand as you use them.

There's a reason that our fingertips have some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body. This is how we experience the world close–up. This is how our tools talk to us. The sense of touch is essential to everything that humans have called 'work' for millions of years.

Now, take out your favorite Magical And Revolutionary Technology Device. Use it for a bit. What did you feel? Did it feel glassy? Did it have no connection whatsoever with the task you were performing?

I call this technology Pictures Under Glass. Pictures Under Glass sacrifice all the tactile richness of working with our hands, offering instead a hokey visual facade."

(Bret Victor, 8 November 2011)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2012

The Gestalt Principles

"Gestalt is a psychology term which means 'unified whole'. It refers to theories of visual perception developed by German psychologists in the 1920s. These theories attempt to describe how people tend to organize visual elements into groups or unified wholes when certain principles are applied."

(Spokane Falls Community College)

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abstractionaesthetics • Berlin School • brain • closeness • closurecognitioncomplete formdesigndesign formalismdesign principlesdesign rules • entirety • essence • figure and ground • form and function • form-generating capability • gestalt effect • gestalt principlesgestalt psychology • gestalt theories • gestalt theories of perception • gestalt theory • gestaltism • graphic designgrouping • human eye • illusion • Kurt Koffka • layout designmodernismmodernist design principlesobjectivityperceptionperceptual organisationpictorial systemsprinciplesproximitypsychology • psychology of design • regularity • reificationrepetitionrulessensesshapesimilaritysymmetrytexturetheory of mindunified wholevisual communicationvisual designvisual illusionvisual literacyvisual perceptionvisual recognitionvisual rulewhole formswhole is greater than the sum of the partswhole is other than the sum of the partswhole situation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2012

The importance of metaphor and narrative to our habits of mind

"Fiction – with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions – offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people's thoughts and feelings.

The novel, of course, is an unequaled medium for the exploration of human social and emotional life. And there is evidence that just as the brain responds to depictions of smells and textures and movements as if they were the real thing, so it treats the interactions among fictional characters as something like real–life social encounters."

(Annie Murphy Paul, 17 March 2012, NYTimes.com)

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affirming experience • booksbrainbrain networksbrain science • cause and effect • cognitive mapcomplex problemscomputer simulationdepictiondescription • emotional life • empathetic individuals • empathyexperiencefictional charactersfrustration • great literature • habits of mind • hidden motives • imaginative metaphors • intentions • interacting instances • languageliterature • longings • mental image • mental state • metaphornarrativenarrative fiction • navigate interactions • neurosciencenovelsoff the page • people and their actions • psychologyreaders • reading novels • real thingreal-life • redolent details • rich replica • simulating reality • simulationsmell • social encounters • social interactionsocial interactionssocial lifesocial worldtexture • the complexities of social life • theory of mindthoughts and feelingswatching television • your brain

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 AUGUST 2011

Off Book: innovative artists working in experimental media

"ARLINGTON, Va.; July 18, 2011 – PBS announced today the premiere of 'Off Book,' a new web series focused on experimental and non–traditional art forms on PBSArts.org that begins July 20 [2011]. This 13–part, bi–weekly series explores the ever–changing definition of art in the hands of the next generation of artists taking creative reigns and melding art with new media. ...

Produced by New York–based production company Kornhaber Brown, 'Off Book' trains a lens on the lives of various artists working in interactive art, online collective art, fashion design, typography, indie music, videogame art, and more. In three–to–five–minute video snapshots of creators who ride the cutting edge, viewers can explore the process, motivation, meaning, and relevance behind their work.

Just as actors reach a point at which they're confident enough to go 'off–book' and leave their scripts behind, the visual and performing artists featured in this series are taking the next steps with their talents and training, forging new artistic paths. 'Off Book' will offer interactive experiences for each of its 13 online episodes, encouraging further viewer participation and providing additional artistic inspiration. ...

The World of Typography – The diversity of typographic expression comes to life through conversations with iconic graphic designer Paula Scher, font designers Tobias Frere–Jones and Jonathan Hoefler, the experimental young designer Eddie Opara, and cutting–edge info–graphic creators Deroy Peraza and Julia Vakser."

(PBSArts.org, 2011)

Fig.1 PBSArts.org (2011). "Off Book", Episode 2, premiered 3 August 2011, (original series premiered 20 July 2011).

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2011aestheticsauthorshipavant-garde • building identity • colourcreative motivationcreative practice • Deroy Peraza • design formalismdesign processdesign systems • digestible imagery • Eddie Opara • experimental mediafashion designfontgraphic designgraphic designer • indie music • infographic designers • infographics • innovative artists • interactive artJonathan Hoefler • Julia Vakser • Kornhaber Brownmotion graphicsOff Book • online collective art • Paula ScherPBSposterposter designprint publicationtexturethe messageTobias Frere-Jonestypetypeface • typeface designers • typefaces • typographical culture • typographyvideogame artvisual communicationvisual information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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