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Which clippings match 'Jacques Derrida' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 MARCH 2014

Deleuze Guattari: Societies of Control and Antipsychiatry

"if the energetic machine expressed the disciplinary bourgeoise society of the 18th and 19th centuries, computers, electronic and cybernetic machines express what Deleuze calls the 'society of control.'"

(Jeremy Jae, 2012)

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TAGS

2012anti-capitalismbourgeoise societycapital accumulationcapital flowscapitalismcontrolcultural relativismculture industry • cybernetic feedback • cybernetic machines • digital technologiesexclusionFelix Guattari • fraying • Gilles Deleuzeglobal communities • global networked society • globalisation • human social relations • inclusionJacques Derrida • Jeremy Jae • mass culture • narcissistic necrosis • networked societynew mediaNorbert Wienerrhizome • sameness • smooth spacesocial space • societies of control • society of control • subjectification • technocratic neo-capitalism • technologically manufactured culture • Theodor Adorno • worldwide circulation of electronic information

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JULY 2011

Glas: Eines der Hauptwerke des Philosophen Jacques Derrida

"Dekonstruktion sollte nicht nur gemeint sein, sondern sprachlich inszeniert werden, was im Falle von Glas sogleich in der Gestaltung des Buches sichtbar wird: Zwei Spalten stehen auf jeder Seite einander gegenüber, links die Auseinandersetzung mit Hegel, rechts der Genet–Teil, wobei beide Textkolumnen keine weiteren Kapitelunterteilungen aufweisen, mitten im Satz beginnen und enden.

Es gibt Anekdoten über einen wochenlangen Streit der Konstanzer Universitätsbibliothek mit dem Buchhändler über angeblich fehlende Seiten am Anfang und Ende des Buches. Auch der fortlaufende Text der beiden Säulen wird häufig durch Zitate unterbrochen, die wie Blöcke in sie eingesetzt sind. Kein Wunder also, dass die Theoretiker des Hypertextes dieses Buch neben Finnegans Wake von Joyce als wichtigen Meilenstein ihrer Vorgeschichte feiern. Man kann gewissermaßen zwischen den Textebenen hin– und hernavigieren, ein fester Bezug–etwa horizontaler Natur zwischen der Hegel– und der Genet–Passage oder zwischen Anfang und Ende–lässt sich dennoch nicht ausmachen."

(Michael Wetzel, Zeit Online)

2). Jacques Derrida (1974) "Glas"

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TAGS

1974 • antithesis • deconstructiondisciplinary boundaries • double-sided • duality • Ferdinand de Saussure • Finnegans Wake • Georg Hegel • glas • glass • grammatology • hegelian dialectichypertextJacques DerridaJames Joyce • Jean Genet • languagelayermetaphysicsparallel text • philosophical discourse • political systems of classification • polyphonypost-structuralismradical critique • stylistic experimentation • subdivision • text layers • two columns • visiblility

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JUNE 2011

A comparable dichotomy between metaphor and metonymy

"Roman Jakobson found a comparable dichotomy between metaphor and metonymy in his seminal paper, 'Two Aspects of Language and Two Types of Aphasic Disturbances,' published in his monograph, Fundamentals of Language (Mouton & Co––Gravenhage, 1956). Here Jakobson discussed two types of aphasia based on complementary disorders in comprehending language: (a) a similarity disorder whereby one primarily depends on syntactic context to draw words into use (pp. 63–64); and (b) a contiguity disorder whereby one's style becomes a telegraphic 'word heap' without much, if any, evidence of syntax (pp. 71–72). According to Jakobson, two faculties are thus involved in the use of language: (a) selection in the choice of words to express an idea (metaphoric); and (b) the combination of words, again to express an idea (metonymic). Elaborate sentences without a particularly impressive vocabulary (for example in the prose of Henry James) illustrates the similarity disorder, while big vocabulary in loosely constructed sentences (for example in the prose of James Joyce) illustrates the contiguity disorder. Joyce heaped together his words with apparent abandonment, while James strenuously belaboured his syntax to produce exactly the right effect––an effect he found difficult to articulate with words alone as opposed to their combination in intricate sentences. An inferior choice of words, Jakobson claimed, is at the sacrifice of metaphor, whereas an inferior combination of words is at the sacrifice of metonymy (p. 76)."

(Edward Jayne)

Jakobson, R. (1971). "Fundamentals of Language". The Hague/Paris: Mouton, Harvard University and Morris Halle, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

1). Edward Jayne. "The Metaphor–Metonymy Binarism"

TAGS

aphasia • choice of wordsClaude Levi-Strauss • combination of words • comprehending language • constructed sentences • contiguitydeconstructionismFerdinand de Saussuregrammar • Henry James • ideasJacques DerridaJacques LacanJames Joyce • John Langshaw Austin • language • langue • langue and parole • Louis Hjelmslev • metaphormetaphoric • metonymic • metonymynaming • paradigmatic relations • parole • Paul de Man • rhetoricRoland Barthes • Roman Jakobson • selection • semiology • semiotics • sentences • signifiedsignifierstructuralism • syntactic context • syntagmatic relations • syntaxtelegraphictropesvocabularyword heapwords

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

The evolution of Postmodernism

"On the way to postmodern, the struggle to reform modern capitalism's dark side, fragmented into a thousand strands. An era approach is rejected – dating the arrival of postmodernism is impossible as is the construction of a linear episodic narrative, moving from the premodern to the modern and then to postmodern. Instead postmodern methods, theories, and worldviews proliferate, as do modern and premodern ones. There are numerous postmodern approaches ranging from naive postmodernism (McPostmodernism) that hails the arrival of postindustrial and complex/adaptive organizations, Baudrillard's and Lyotard's versions of radical breaks from modernity, to others seeking more integration with critical theory. Some claim to have moved beyond postmodern to something called postpostmodern that would include hybrids (postmodern variants with modern and premodern), language 'heteroglossia' (the coexistence of many voices at the same time in tension with each other), and various 'dark side postmoderns' looking at global reterritorialization, postmodern war, postcolonialism and the ills of capitalism"

(David M. Boje, 2007)

1). Postmodernism – by David M. Boje (2007) To appear in Yiannis Gabriel's Thesaurus, London: Oxford University Press, forthcoming

TAGS

Bruno Latourcapitalismconsumption spectaclecritical theorycritiquedeconstruction • Douglas Kellner • episodic narrative • Fredric Jameson • Gibson Burrell • grand narrativesGulf WarGuy Debordheteroglossia • history of philosophy • iPodJacques DerridaJean BaudrillardJean-Francois LyotardJurgen HabermaslanguageLas Vegas • Linda Smircich • Marta B Calas • McDonalds • McPostmodernism • Michel FoucaultmodernismmodernityNietzscheNikePeter Druckerpost-structuralismpostindustrialPostmodernpostmodernismpremodernreterritorialisation • Steven Best • Stewart R. Clegg • Vietnam war • Wal-Mart • William Bergquist • World War IWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 FEBRUARY 2009

The engineer is a myth produced by the bricoleur

"If one calls bricolage the necessity of borrowing one's concept from the text of a heritage which is more or less coherent or ruined, it must be said that every discourse is bricoleur. The engi~eer, whom Levi–Strauss opposes to the bricoleur, should be one to construct the totality of his language, syntax, and lexicon. In this sense the engineer is a myth. A subject who would supposedly be the absolute origin of his own discourse and would supposedly construct it 'out of nothing,' 'out of whole cloth,' would be the creator of the verbe, the verbe itself. The notion of the engineer who had supposedly broken with all forms of bricolage is therefore a theological idea; and since Levi–Strauss tells us elsewhere that bricolage is mythopoetic, the odds are that thee engineer is a myth produced by the bricoleur. From the moment that we cease to believe in such an engineer and in a discourse breaking with the received historical discourse, as soon as it is admitted that every finite discourse is bound by a cenain bricolage, and that the engineer and the scientist are also species of bricoleurs then the very idea of bricolage is menaced and the difference in which it took on its meaning decomposes."
(Jacques Derrida)

Jacques Derrida, Writing and Difference, trans. Alan Bass. London: Routledge, pp 278–294

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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