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Which clippings match 'Stanford University' keyword pg.1 of 3
01 NOVEMBER 2013

d.school: Design Thinking Bootcamp

"The Bootcamp Bootleg is an overview of some of our most–used tools. The guide was originally intended for recent graduates of our Bootcamp: Adventures in Design Thinking class. But we've heard from folks who've never been to the d.school that have used it to create their own introductory experience to design thinking. The Bootcamp Bootleg is more of a cook book than a text book, and more of a constant work–in–progress than a polished and permanent piece. This resource is free for you to use and share – and we hope you do."

(d.school at Stanford University)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
15 JULY 2013

Peter Norvig: The 100,000-student classroom

"In the fall of 2011 Peter Norvig taught a class with Sebastian Thrun on artificial intelligence at Stanford attended by 175 students in situ –– and over 100,000 via an interactive webcast. He shares what he learned about teaching to a global classroom."

(TED Talks)

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TAGS

14th century2011 • Andrew Ng • artificial intelligenceaudiencebar • Bayes networks • Benjamin BloomclassroomCoursera (provider) • Daphne Koller • disruptive education • due date • Eric Mazur • flipped classroomsflipping the classroomgame theoryglobal classroomin situ • interactive webcast • Khan Academy • MITx • motivationone-on-oneonline classesonline forumopen-ended questionspeer instruction • Peter Norvig • sage on the stageSebastian Thrun • Stanford Coursera • Stanford University • synchronous learning • Teach For America • teachingTED Talks • traditional education • Udacitywebcastwebcasting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2013

Pioneering 1968 demo of experimental computer technologies

"On December 9, 1968, Douglas C. Engelbart and the group of 17 researchers working with him in the Augmentation Research Center at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA, presented a 90–minute live public demonstration of the online system, NLS, they had been working on since 1962. The public presentation was a session of the Fall Joint Computer Conference held at the Convention Center in San Francisco, and it was attended by about 1,000 computer professionals. This was the public debut of the computer mouse. But the mouse was only one of many innovations demonstrated that day, including hypertext, object addressing and dynamic file linking, as well as shared–screen collaboration involving two persons at different sites communicating over a network with audio and video interface."

(Stanford University Libraries)

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TAGS

1960s1968Augmentation Research Center at SRIBerkeley (University of California)computer historycomputer mousecomputer networksdemoDouglas Engelbart • Fall Joint Computer Conference • HCIhierarchical visualisation • human communication • human-computer interactionhyperlinkhypertexthypertext systeminformation spaces • information structures • information systems • interactive computing • keyboardlinking • multimedia demonstration • networked computer system • networked telecommunications systems • NLS • oN-Line System (NLS) • pioneeringpioneering technologySan Francisco • Stanford Research Institute • Stanford Universitytechnology pioneerUC Berkeley • video teleconferencing • videoconferencingvisionary ideaswindows metaphor • word processing • word processor • workstation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

The talent myth: how to maximise your creative potential

"Most of us grow up being taught that talent is an inheritance, like brown hair or blue eyes. Therefore, we presume that the surest sign of talent is early, instant, effortless success, ie, being a prodigy. In fact, a well–established body of research shows that that assumption is false. Early success turns out to be a weak predictor of long–term success.

Many top performers are overlooked early on, then grow quietly into stars. This list includes Charles Darwin (considered slow and ordinary by teachers), Walt Disney (fired from an early job because he 'lacked imagination'), Albert Einstein, Louis Pasteur, Paul Gauguin, Thomas Edison, Leo Tolstoy, Fred Astaire, Winston Churchill, Lucille Ball, and so on. One theory, put forth by Dr Carol Dweck of Stanford University, is that the praise and attention prodigies receive leads them to instinctively protect their 'magical' status by taking fewer risks, which eventually slows their learning.

The talent hotbeds are not built on identifying talent, but on constructing it. They are not overly impressed by precociousness and do not pretend to know who will succeed. While I was visiting the US Olympic Training Centre at Colorado Springs, I asked a roomful of 50 experienced coaches if they could accurately assess a top 15–year–old's chances of winning a medal in the Games two years from then? Only one coach raised his hand.

If you have early success, do your best to ignore the praise and keep pushing yourself to the edges of your ability, where improvement happens. If you don't have early success, don't quit. Instead, treat your early efforts as experiments, not as verdicts."

(Daniel Coyle, 25 August 2012, The Independent)

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TAGS

Albert EinsteinattentionCarol DweckCharles Darwin • coach • Colorado Springs • constructing talent • creative potential • early success • effortless success • Fred Astaire • inheritance • instant success • Leo Tolstoylong-term successLouis Pasteur • Lucille Ball • magical status • Olympic Games 2012 • Olympic medal • Paul Gauguin • perseverance • praise • precociousness • prodigy • risk averserisk-takingStanford Universitytalent • talent hotbed • talent myth • Thomas Edison • top performers • US Olympic Training Centre • Walt DisneyWinston Churchill

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 FEBRUARY 2013

Metamedia at Stanford

"Metamedia ia a studio and lab that pursues research and pedagogy in design history and media materialities.

It is located online, in Stanford Archaeology Center, and has worldwide affiliates.

Metamedia combines archaeology and media, with an archaeological and long–term focus on how people get on with things, with media(works) treated as modes of engagement between people and things. Media as artifacts and prostheses as well as systems to convey meaning: we emphasize the materialities of mediation at the heart of design – the way the steel was burnished, the clay was turned, how the vessel connects makers and materials, users and contents in genealogies of containment, portage, representation ... whatever work gets done."

TAGS

archaeological media lab • archaeological sensibility • archaeological view • archaeology • archaeology and media • archiveartefactsbetween people and things • constantly revisiting the past • contemporary experience • designdesign history • genealogies of containment • historicity • how people get on with things • makers and materials • material modalities • material modes of engagementmaterialitiesmaterialitymeaning making • media materialities • media works • mediationmemory • Metamedia (archaeological media lab) • modes of engagement • portage • prosthesis • re-presentation • re-presenting • research lab • reworking • sense of history • Stanford Archaeology Center • Stanford Universitythe pastthingstraces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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