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Which clippings match 'Craftsperson' keyword pg.1 of 1
02 JANUARY 2013

Addressing contemporary issues through traditional craft practices

"Binding handcrafted books for me is not merely a way of turning back the clock, but a way of addressing contemporary issues, both environmental and social as well as aesthetic."

(Michael O'Brien, Bookbinder)

"A Step Back In Time", short documentary about Oamaru's iconoclastic bookbinder Michael O'Brien. Director: Moss Bowering–Scott, Research: Libby Dallison, Executive Producers: Richard Bell and Steve Bloxham, New Zealand Broadcasting School, CPIT, Uploaded to YouTube on 16 August 2010.

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TAGS

2010Aotearoa New Zealand • archival paper • authentic materialsauthenticity of thingsbook • bookbinder • bookbindingCPIT • craft evangelist • crafts traditioncraftsmanshipcraftspersoncritical consciousness • critical reappraisal • design essentialismdifferent futureseccentric • handcrafted books • handmadehumanisation of technologylimits of progresslocalmanual qualities • Michael OBrien • moggans • New Zealand Broadcasting School • OamaruOtagopaper • paper marbling • perception of modernityshort documentarysustainabilitytactile richnesstraditional practicesVictorian • Victorian Oamaru • Victorian Town at Work • ways of life

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The concept of the craftsperson has moved far from the worlds of material practices

"Richard Sennett's seminal work on skills in society is an authoritative reference to this research (Sennett, 2008). His book asks two key questions: What are skills and what are the ways in which skills improve? He shows that there are three issues at the heart of what is involved in becoming a craftsman (someone who posses skills) today. That the concept of the craftsman has moved far from the worlds of material practices. Nowadays it includes computer programmers but there is continuity between those who worked with their hands in the physical world in the past to those who work in, for example the virtual world today! He argues skills are talked about and understood in a very narrow way and there is a limited sense of what we mean by being skilled."

(Robert Young, Elizabeth MacLarty, Kathryn McKelvey)

Sennett, R. (2008). The Craftsman. London, Penguin Books.

Young, R., E. MacLarty, et al. (2009). The Design Postgraduate Journeyman: Mapping the Relationship between Design Thinking and Doing with Skills Acquisition for Skilful Practice. International Association of Societies of Design Research.

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 JUNE 2010

The craftsperson animates the form through years of practice

"Creation, whether in art, research, teaching, or entrepreneurship, requires craft. Sociologist Richard Sennett (2008) suggests that, to be at its best, the craftsperson's deft use of tools and materials, combined with an intuition developed from years of practice, create reciprocity that animates the form. Sennett argues that the craftsperson, engaged in a continual dialogue with materials, does not suffer the divide of understanding and doing. The craftsperson must be patient, avoiding quick fixes. Good work of this sort emphasizes the lessons of experience through a dialogue between tacit knowledge and explicit critique (Sennett, 2008)."

(Liora Bresler, 2009, p.17)

Bresler, L. (2009). "University Faculty as Intellectual Entrepreneurs: Vision, Experiential Learning, and Animation." Visual Arts Research 35(1 Summer 2009).

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TAGS

2009 • animates the form • artcraftcraftspersoncreationcreative practice • deft use of tools • dialogue with materialsentrepreneurshipexperience • explicit critique • Liora Bresler • practiceresearchRichard Sennetttacit knowledgeteachingtruth to materials

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 NOVEMBER 2009

Dance techne: kinetic bodily logos and thinking in movement

"Techne is a name both for the activities and skills of a craftsman and for the arts of both mind and hand, but is also linked to creative making, poiesis. Poiesis is normally translated as 'making', but Heidegger interprets poiesis as 'bringing–forth' (Her–vor–bringen), creation. An apple tree 'brings–forth' its fruits as a silversmith 'brings–forth' a chalice. In this sense of poiesis, there is a deep commonality between natural production and human production in that they both bring–forth whether by making or by growing. Physis, the arising of something from out of itself, is a bringing–forth, poiesis. Physis is indeed poiesis in the highest sense. Physis, often translated as 'nature', signifies not simply geological or biological processes, but the Being of all beings. Techne is a mode of poiesis in the extended sense which Heidegger attributes to poiesis. This means that both humans and nature bring–forth their products. They differ only in that nature brings–forth itself whereas humans bring–forth from another. In the ancient world natural production is the primary sense of production, human production is derivative from it, or, as the usual translation has it, 'art imitates nature'. In the modern world human making is primary and nature is understood as a self–making. Poiesis is related to that which comes–forth out of its own nature alone and techne is related to that which comes–forth only by our intervention in that nature.

Heidegger illuminates techne in describing the cabinetmaker's work. A cabinetmaker is not merely skilled in using his tools. His craft lies in his ability to understand different kinds of wood and the shapes slumbering within wood. He is not related to his materials in the way of the industrial machine operator who uses the raw materials. The craftsman has a feel for his materials, he has become part of them. The handling of the wood is not a mere manipulation of it, but proceeds with a sensitive, firm touch which assists the wood in becoming the cabinet. The cabinetmaker's role is something like that of a midwife. In the techne of the craftsman there is a releasement toward things. Here we see that letting–be means neither passivity nor domination. When techne becomes technique, the attitude of 'letting–be' loses its priority over 'making–be' and craft becomes domination. In this process work changes its character.

The artist's work differs from the cabinetmaker's work, though they both have techne. The creation of an artwork requires craftsmanship. In fabricating equipment, the cabinet, material, wood is used, and used up. It disappears into its usefulness. The material is all the better and more suitable the less it resists perishing in the equipmental being of the equipment. The sculptor uses stone just as the mason uses it, in his own way, but the sculptor does not use it up. The artist is a handiworker who knows how the material behaves, but he lets come what is already coming to presence."

(Jaana Parviainen, choreograph.net)

Fig.1 nagpur59, 'Maori wood craftsman', 20 February 2006, Rotarua, Aotearoa New Zealand

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TAGS

art imitates nature • cabinetmaker • choreographycraft • craftsman • craftspersoncreative practicedancedialogue with materialsenframingGestell • handiwork • improvisationkinetic bodily logoslogosMartin Heideggermaterials • Maxine Sheets-Johnstone • movement • physis • poiesis • techne • technique • thinking in movement • wood

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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