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25 JULY 2013

jQuery Mobile: touch-friendly websites for browsers and devices

"jQuery Mobile is an example of the web living up to its promise of everyone having equal access to free and public content posted to the web, regardless of the device they are using. It isn't just for mobile, it's 'mobile–first', NOT 'mobile–only' so it can be used as a base for responsive web design. All those great touch–friendly form inputs and widgets are fully themeable and work great no matter what the device (mobile or desktop)."

(Marc Grabanski, 19 April 2013)

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AJAXCSSdesign for the screendigital design • Filament Group • HTML5interaction designjQueryjQuery Mobile • layout engine • Marc Grabanski • mediated interactionmobile • mobile first • mobile first web design • mobile only • page navigation model • Scott Jehl • screen-based interfacetablet interfacetechnology innovationtechnology solution • theme engine • Todd Parker • touch-friendly interface • touch-friendly UI widgets • touchscreen • touchscreen phones • UI widgets • user experienceuser interface designvisualisationweb design • web design ready • web first • widget

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 APRIL 2013

Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen Based Interfaces

"Interface design has often been considered a subsection of interaction design (Moggridge, 2007; Löwgren & Stolterman, 2004; Bagnara & Crampton Smith, 2006). In the shift from designing objects to designing experiences, interaction design needs to investigate temporal as well as spatial form (Redström, 2001; Mazé & Redström, 2005), and to see computation as basic material.

From a social, cultural and humanistic perspective, studies of the design of interactions and their contexts of use can be understood in terms of mediated communication and the historical, social, playful and aesthetic in digital design (Blythe, Overbeeke, Monk, & Wright, 2003; Lunenfeld, 1999). This approach has been framed as Communication Design (Morrison et al., in press). This mediational perspective of digital communication is informed by studies in new media, social semiotics, socio–cultural studies of learning and work, and practice–based research into multimodal composition in which mediated discourse itself undergoes change through active use (Jones & Norris, 2005; Morrison, in press). This view is distinct from the structuralist and directional or 'transmission' models of communication (e.g., Crilly, Maier, & Clarkson, 2008) that are not rooted in cultural and mediational theory. From a Communication Design perspective, the interface itself mediates; it is understood as socially and culturally constructed and situated. Such a perspective is not very widely articulated in discussions of the interface in design research. Further, few studies exist of dynamic, digital interfaces and their multimodal characteristics from a specifically media and Communication Design view (e.g., Skjulstad, 2007).

In their design activity, interaction designers invest heavily in the shaping of interfaces as symbolic and cultural texts. Alongside this attention to design, and with reference to user–driven studies, we also need to unpack the features and possible functions of these emerging forms of mediated communication. The proliferation of 'movement in the interface' demands that we pay attention to a variety of media types, genre conventions and earlier media, and to the ways that elements of these are combined in different configurations. Social semiotics provides some means for relating the various graphical, animational and kinetic aspects of dynamic interfaces within a wider communicative perspective.3"

(Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison, 2010)

Jon Olav H. Eikenes and Andrew Morrison (2010). "Navimation: Exploring Time, Space & Motion in the Design of Screen–based Interfaces", International Journal of Design Vol 4, No 1.

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2010aesthetic experience • Andrew Monk • Andrew Morrison • animational communication • Anja Maier • Bill Moggridge • communication design • computation as material • cultural perspective • cultural texts • design for the screendesign researchdesigning experiencesdesigning objectsdigital communicationdigital design • dynamic digital interfaces • dynamic interfacesemerging digital media • emerging forms • Erik Stolterman • funology • genre conventions • Gillian Crampton Smith • graphical communication • humanistic perspectiveinteraction designinterface designInternational Journal of Design • Johan Redstrom • Jonas Lowgren • Kees Overbeeke • kinetic bodily logos • Mark Blythe • material thinking • media and communication design • media as material objectsmediated communication • mediated discourse • mediated interaction • mediational perspective • mediational theory • movement in the interface • multimodal characteristics • multimodal compositionmultimodal user interfaces • Nathan Crilly • navimation • new media • P John Clarkson • Peter Lunenfeld • Peter Wrigh • playfulnesspractice-based research • Ramia Maze • Rodney Jones • screen-based interface • Sebastiano Bagnara • Sigrid Norris • situated perspective • social perspective • social semiotics • socio-cultural studies of learning • spatial form • spatial ordersymbolic meaning • Synne Skjulstad • temporal form • transmission model of communicationuser-driven

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2011

MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0: Biofeedback Art

"Biofeedback art is recently emerged interactive art form which applies technologies to capture biological changes of the body and create an artistic meaning through them. Biofeedback interfaces measures EEG, galvanic skin response, facial analysis, temperature analysis, eye–tracking or hearth rate in order to monitor the users bio–philosophical and produce a dynamic psychological/behavioural/emotion–based analysis of the person. The artistic meaning production based on the applications of these qualities which often deals with embodiment, enaction, body awareness, immersion or active/passive bodily engagement. There are a variety of tools can be used by artists which are usually divided to contact (for example EEG) or non–contact (facial analysis through camera). The MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0 presents a collection of engaging art works and experiments in this hot topic of media art."

(MediaArtTube)

Fig.1 Brainloop interactive performance platform http://www.aksioma.org/brainloop/index.html

Fig.2 Yasushi Noguchi, Hideyuki Ando – Watch Me!, eye–responsive Installation 2009 http://r–dimension.xsrv.jp/projects_e/watch_me/

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actuators • affective art • affective computing • affective environment • applied researchArs Electronica • art works • behavioural analysis • bio art • bio-philosophical analysis • bio-sensors • biofeedback • biofeedback art • biofeedback interfaces • biological changes • blood volume pressure • bodily engagementbodybody awareness • body data • brain • cognitive-based concept • communication devicecomputer interfaceconvergencecorrelative analoguecreative technologydata visualisationdevicedigital art • EEG • electroencephalography • electronic artembodied interactionsembodimentemotion research • emotion-based analysis • erotic ambiguity • external world • eye-trackingfacial analysis • galvanic skin response • graphic representationHCI • heartbeat • hearth rate monitor • humidity • hybrid art • immersioninformation aestheticsinteraction designinteractive artinteractive media artinteractive performanceinteractive visualisationinterface artinterface designkinetic artman machinemeasurementmedia art • MediaArtTube • micro-bio-electrochemical systems • micro-electromechanical • mobile phonenew media artpsychological analysispulse • responsive environment • robotrobot artscreen-based interface • skin conductivity • smell • stroke • sweat • tangible biofeedback • tangible interfacetechnology-based arttemperature analysis • tickle • time-based art • ventilators • vibrationvibratorvirtual realityvirtual worldvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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