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17 DECEMBER 2014

An Informal Catalogue of Slit-Scan Video Artworks and Research

"Slitscan imaging techniques are used to create static images of time–based phenomena. In traditional film photography, slit scan images are created by exposing film as it slides past a slit–shaped aperture. In the digital realm, thin slices are extracted from a sequence of video frames, and concatenated into a new image.

Recently I've seen many new–media projects based on slit–scan techniques. They range from student projects, to Java demonstrations on the Processing.org site, to works by recognized pioneers of video and interactive art. My inclination to make lists is irresistible, and so I've put together this catalogue as an aid to researchers and students. My aim is to be as inclusive as possible, rather than attempt to winnow the projects down to just a few ideal exemplars or the most significant historic precursors. Thus not all of the examples are even computational: some of the projects described below use motion–picture film, still photography, or analog video techniques."

(Golan Levin)

Compiled by Golan Levin. Begun: 1 March 2005. Last edit: 17 July 2010.

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Adam Finkelstein • Adam MagyarAlexei Shulgin • Allison Klein • Alvaro Cassinelli • Andrew Davidhazy • Andy Polaine • Angus Leadley Brown • Anna Szepesi • Ansen Seale • Aristarkh Chernyshev • Bill Spinhoven • Bjorn Barnekow • Bradford Bohonus • Brendan Dawes • Bryan Mumford • Camille Utterback • Christian Hossner • Christian Kessler • Christian Rohner • chronophotography • Claude Hidber • computational art • Dan Kaminsky • Daniel CrooksDaniel Rozin • Daniel Sauter • Datadouche • David Tinapple • Derek Burnett • Dietmar Offenhuber • Dirk Lusebrink • divisionism • Don Whitaker • Douglas Trumbull • E.J. Gone • Eddie Elliott • Egbert Mittelstadt • epipolar diagram • Eric Lee • Fabian Thommen • Geert Mul • George Silk • Glen Murphy • Golan Levin • Greg Ercolano • Guy Hoffman • HC Gilje • He-Lin Luo • image stretching • Jacques-Henri Lartigue • James Seo • Jean-Michel Jarre • Ji-Hoon Byun • Joachim Sauter • Joe Baldwin • Juanjo Fernandez Rivero • Jussi Angesleva • Keith Lam • Kenji Mase • Kevin Atkinson • Kurt Ralske • Mark Hauenstein • Martin Hilpoltsteiner • Martin Reinhart • Masatoshi Ishikawa • Masayuki Akamatsui • Mateusz Herczka • mechanical technique • Michael Aschauer • Michael Cohen • Michael Naimark • Michael Terry • Mindfukc • Miska Knapek • Mitchell Whitelaw • Mogens Jacobsen • multiperspective panorama • Neil Jenkins • new media aestheticsNHK • Nicolas Horne • NYX • Osman Khan • Paul de Marinis • Paul Harter • Peter-Pike Sloan • Pipilotti Rist • Processing (software) • R Greenberg Associates • Robert Seidel • rolling shutter • Roman Haefeli • Romy Achituv • Ross Cooper • Roy Tanck • Sascha Pohflepp • scanner photography • scanning digital camera • scannography • scanography • Scott Carver • Scott Owsley • Sid Fels • slit-scan cameraslit-scan photography • slit-scan techniques • slit-shaped aperture • space-time correlation • space-time representation • spacio-temporal imaging • spatiotemporal imaging • Steina Vasulka • Stephan Schulz • streak photography • strip photography • Susanne Jaschko • synchroballistic photography • Tamas Waliczky • Tania Ruiz Gutierrez • temporal displacement map • temporal movementtime slicingtime-based art • time-based phenomena • time-motion studiesToshio Iwaivideo and digital art • videogram • Virgil Wildrich • William Larson • Zbig Rybczynski

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 DECEMBER 2013

Motive Architecture: spaces which engage social interaction

"Architecture traditionally has been considered the spatial backdrop to social interaction. But increasingly architects enabled by computational technologies are creating spaces that can engage actively within these social interactions. My research focuses on the non verbal aspects of human computer interaction, embedding kinetic behaviours into physical objects. ...

While increasing numbers of designers are using robotic systems to build novel performative objects and spaces, there is little discourse in design on what forms of motion are most engaging and why? I am exploring how, and when, we percieve animism and causality in moving objects as I hypothesise that the most salient of motions are those which give a subjective impression that something is alive. My research examines the minimal amount of motion required to elicit immediate and seemingly irresistible interpretations of life gaining inspiration from the perceptual research of Michotte (1946), Heider and Simmel (1944), and Tremoulet and Feldmann (2006). A test rig for suspending and animating simple geometric figures has been developed to test methods of eliciting anima. Computer vision systems have been developed in parallel to observe human levels of engagement and to explore novel forms of exchange between architecture and inhabitant."

(Ruairi Glynn)

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Albert Michotte • aliveanima • animate form • animational communicationarchitectureautomation • Bartlett School of Architecture • believable charactersbuilt environmentcausalitycognitive science • computational technologies • design research • Fritz Heider • geometric figureshuman computer interactioninteractive architectureinteractive environments • Jacob Feldman • kinetic automatonkinetic bodily logoskinetic sculpture • Marianne Simmel • motive architecture • moving objects • non-linear sequence • nonverbal behaviour • novel forms of exchange • novel performative objects • Patrice Tremoulet • perceptual research • performative spacesphysical engagementphysical objects • Ranulph Glanville • reactive spacerobotic sculpturerobotic systemsRuairi Glynnsocial interaction • spatial backdrop • Stephen Gage • structural forces • test methods • test rig • time-based architecture • time-based art • triggered by stimuli

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
09 DECEMBER 2012

The Art & Media Course at Tama Art University in Japan

"Art & Media Course in Information Design Department of Tama Art University manages various kinds of art forms by utilizing digital technologies and bio medias, such like interactive installations, audio & visual performances, software arts, bio arts, digital animations, and future cinemas. Through the background of recent dynamic changes of relationship between technology and human society, we aim to bring up new types of multi–skilled creators who can transcend the traditional boundaries of fine arts, science, engineering, mathematics and philosophy.The Course has established unique creative environment configured by four individual laboratories which has their own research themes."

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applied media arts • art and culture • Art and Media Course in Information Design Department • art forms • art history • art media • art theorybio artbio data • bio media art • CGIcommunication designcommunication design education • communications networks • community arts • craft and materials • creative cinema • cultural and social relations • Department of Information Design • design coursedesign managementdesign theory • digital animation • digital architecturedigital technologiesdrawing • Faculty of Fine Arts • fine art • future cinema • future phenomenology • human interfaces • IDDlab • information and society • information design • information networks • information without form • integrated media arts • interaction designinteractive artinterdisciplinary workingJapankinetic artmedia arts • media design history • media design theory • media information literacy • multi-skilled creatorsnew craftsperforming arts • social network theory • software artsound art • Tama Art University • technology and human societytime-based artvideo artvideo mediavisual literacyvisual media • write objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JUNE 2011

MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0: Biofeedback Art

"Biofeedback art is recently emerged interactive art form which applies technologies to capture biological changes of the body and create an artistic meaning through them. Biofeedback interfaces measures EEG, galvanic skin response, facial analysis, temperature analysis, eye–tracking or hearth rate in order to monitor the users bio–philosophical and produce a dynamic psychological/behavioural/emotion–based analysis of the person. The artistic meaning production based on the applications of these qualities which often deals with embodiment, enaction, body awareness, immersion or active/passive bodily engagement. There are a variety of tools can be used by artists which are usually divided to contact (for example EEG) or non–contact (facial analysis through camera). The MediaArtTube Exhibition 1.0 presents a collection of engaging art works and experiments in this hot topic of media art."

(MediaArtTube)

Fig.1 Brainloop interactive performance platform http://www.aksioma.org/brainloop/index.html

Fig.2 Yasushi Noguchi, Hideyuki Ando – Watch Me!, eye–responsive Installation 2009 http://r–dimension.xsrv.jp/projects_e/watch_me/

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actuators • affective art • affective computing • affective environment • applied researchArs Electronica • art works • behavioural analysis • bio art • bio-philosophical analysis • bio-sensors • biofeedback • biofeedback art • biofeedback interfaces • biological changes • blood volume pressure • bodily engagementbodybody awareness • body data • brain • cognitive-based concept • communication devicecomputer interfaceconvergencecorrelative analoguecreative technologydata visualisationdevicedigital art • EEG • electroencephalography • electronic artembodied interactionsembodimentemotion research • emotion-based analysis • erotic ambiguity • external world • eye-trackingfacial analysis • galvanic skin response • graphic representationHCI • heartbeat • hearth rate monitor • humidity • hybrid art • immersioninformation aestheticsinteraction designinteractive artinteractive media artinteractive performanceinteractive visualisationinterface artinterface designkinetic artman machinemeasurementmedia art • MediaArtTube • micro-bio-electrochemical systems • micro-electromechanical • mobile phonenew media artpsychological analysispulse • responsive environment • robotrobot artscreen-based interface • skin conductivity • smell • stroke • sweat • tangible biofeedback • tangible interfacetechnology-based arttemperature analysis • tickle • time-based art • ventilators • vibrationvibratorvirtual realityvirtual worldvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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