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Which clippings match 'Contradiction' keyword pg.1 of 1
14 DECEMBER 2012

Thought Maybe: a video resource to inform and inspire action

"This is a website that aims to provoke your thoughts not only about these important issues, but many other pertinent topics relevant to modern society, industrial civilisation and globalised dominant culture.

There's already a lot of information on the Internet, so our goal is to cut through the noise and garbage, to present credible information in a clear way, so it's accessible, useful and easily digested. This still may not be an easy undertaking though, and we can understand that – especially considering the complexity and interconnectedness of the topics, as well as the crossing over of sources; but also for the fact that the information here can be incomplete, sometimes contradictory or even controversial. But this is the point. It's all part of what we're trying to do: provoke critical thinking, questioning... and doing.

We've fundamentally built this resource to inform and inspire action – and no, we're not talking about clicking the stupid 'Like' button on Facebook, signing online petitions or letter writing – we mean informing and inspiring real–world action; taking this information away from the computer to rejuvenate the strong networks with the people around you in the real world, to discuss, plan, act. This is not a symbolic action or clicktivism website, it's a resource to inform, inspire and provoke.

We aim to generate a multitude of responses, reactions and methods to the work we're doing, because that's what is needed to solve the plethora of puzzles and problems addressed in the information we publish. Some of these puzzles are big, some are small, but everywhere you look, there's good work to be done."

(Thought Maybe)

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TAGS

clicktivismcomplexitycontradictioncontradiction and changecontroversial • controversial information • credible informationcritical thinking • crossing over of sources • globalised culture • incite • incomplete information • industrial civilisation • inform and inspire • information • inspire action • interconnectednessmodern societyonline resource • pertinent topics • provocationquestioning • real-world action • rejuvenate networks • strong networks • symbolic action • Thought Maybe • video libraryvideo publishingvideo repositoryvideo resources

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

The New Art Exchange presents Raghu Rai's Invocations from India

29 January – 30 April 2011, The New Art Exchange, Hyson Green, Nottingham, UK.

"New Art Exchange is delighted to present an exhibition of works by world renowned Magnum photographer Raghu Rai, for the first time in a public gallery in the UK, including new work from 2010.

Rai's work proclaims the rich diversity of contemporary India, with its juxtapositions of ancient and modern, where the people are the landscape. He photographs an India teeming with colour, history, beauty and brilliance whilst uncovering a continent's domestic rituals with these striking images of Indian street life, festivals and the changing seasons.

'Over the centuries, so much has melded into India that it's not really one country, and it's not one culture. It is crowded with crosscurrents of many religions, beliefs, cultures and their practices that may appear incongruous. But India keeps alive the inner spirit of her own civilization with all its contradictions. Here, several centuries have learnt to live side by side at the same time. And a good photograph is a lasting witness to that, as photography is a history of our times: being a multi–lingual, multi– cultured and multi– religious society, the images must speak these complexities through a multi–layered experience.' – Raghu Rai"

(The New Art Exchange, 2011)

Fig.1 Raghu Rai (1964). 'Traffic At Chawri Bazar', Delhi

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TAGS

2011artistartsauthorshipcontemporary art • contemporary India • contradictioncultural practicedocumentaryexhibitionfestivalIndia • Indian street life • juxtapositionlandscape • Magnum Photo Agency • multiculturalNAENew Art ExchangeNottinghampersonal spacephotography • Raghu Rai • ritualsocial changesocial realitySouth AsiaspacespectacletraditiontransformationUKvisual arts

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 APRIL 2006

Wherever You Go, There You Are: Journeys To The Same Place

"Omnitopia enacts an architectural and perceptual enclave whose apparently distinct locales (and locals) convey inhabitants to a singular place. An imperfect amalgam of Greek and Latin roots constructing an 'all–place,' the term draws its lineage from utopia (non–place) and heterotopia (other–place) to reveal the shift from singular totalizing narratives to overlapping contradictory narratives. A key distinction from heterotopia, however, is omnitopia's shift from separate locale (park, church, graveyard, motel) to complete enclosure that approximates all of urbanity. This enclosure does not reside elsewhere, but 'everywhere.' Heterotopia offers a social safety valve from public life. Omnitopia, on the other hand, constructs a synecdoche of the world, one that is necessarily and strategically incomplete. While the 'entire world' cannot reside within the omnitopian enclosure, one encounters enough of the world to ignore what has been elided. The archetypal omnitopian may be the traveler who flows from international airport to atrium hotel to enclosed shopping mall to theme restaurant to yet another international airport – all without ever walking the streets. Moreover, as our archetypal omnitopian flows from airport to airport, she or he comes to experience them as terminals to the same place."
(Andrew F. Wood)

Wood, Andrew. (2003). A rhetoric of ubiquity: Terminal space as omnitopia. Communication Theory, 13(3), 324–344.

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TAGS

airport • Andrew Wood • arcade • atrium hotel • contradictioncontradictory narratives • enclosed shopping mall • everywhere • heterotopiainternational airportmall • omnitopia • overlap • overlapping • placeplacelessness • same place • shopping mall • synecdoche • themed restaurant • travellerutopia
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