Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Microsoft Excel' keyword pg.1 of 1
30 OCTOBER 2013

Forget big data, small data is the real revolution

"Big data smacks of the centralization fads we've seen in each computing era. The thought that 'hey there's more data than we can process!' (something which is no doubt always true year–on–year since computing began) is dressed up as the latest trend with associated technology must–haves.

Meanwhile we risk overlooking the much more important story here, the real revolution, which is the mass democratisation of the means of access, storage and processing of data. This story isn't about large organisations running parallel software on tens of thousand of servers, but about more people than ever being able to collaborate effectively around a distributed ecosystem of information, an ecosystem of small data. ...

And when we want to scale up the way to do that is through componentized small data: by creating and integrating small data "packages" not building big data monoliths, by partitioning problems in a way that works across people and organizations, not through creating massive centralized silos.

This next decade belongs to distributed models not centralized ones, to collaboration not control, and to small data not big data."

(Rufus Pollock, 25 April 2013)

1

TAGS

big datacentralisation • centralised silos • collaborate effectively • collaboration not control • componentised small data • computing era • creating and integrating small datadatadata accessdata contextdata humanisationdata into information • data monoliths • data packages • data revolution • data sharingdata visualisation • data wrangling • decentralisationdistributed ecosystemdistributed modelsHans Rosling • household energy use • information ecosystemintimate exchangesliteracylittle data • local buses • local government spending • local narratives • loosely joined • mass democratisation • means of access • Microsoft Excel • one ring to rule them all • Open Knowledge Foundation • partitioning problems • people and organisationspocket datapopulation change • processing of data • processing-power • Rufus Pollocksensemakingsmall data • small pieces loosely joined • storage of data • technology must-haves • trend forecasting

CONTRIBUTOR

Neal White
15 APRIL 2012

Beta blockers? : proprietary data formats may be legally defensible but open standards can be a better spur for innovation

"Thomson [Thomson Reuters] makes the proprietary bibliography software EndNote, and claims that Zotero is causing its commercial business 'irreparable harm' and is wilfully and intentionally destroying Thomson's customer base. In particular, Thomson is demanding that GMU stop distributing the newer beta–version of Zotero that allegedly allows EndNote's proprietary data format for storing journal citation styles to be converted into an open–standard format readable by Zotero and other software. Thomson claims that Zotero 'reverse engineered or decompiled' not only the format, but also the EndNote software itself. ...

Litigation, which may go to a jury trial, is pending, so judging this case on its legal merits would be premature. But on a more general level, the virtues of interoperability and easy data–sharing among researchers are worth restating. Imagine if Microsoft Word or Excel files could be opened and saved only in these proprietary formats, for example. It would be impossible for OpenOffice and other such software to read and save these files using open standards – as they can legally do.

Competition between open–source and proprietary software is long–running, as personified by the struggle between Windows and Linux for desktop and server operating systems, but also in many branches of software used by scientists. Researchers tend to lean towards open sharing, but they will also pay for added–value features, and it's important that the playing field is level. Ultimately, the customer is king."

(Nature, p.708)

Nature Volume 455, p.708 (9 October 2008) | doi:10.1038/455708a; Published online 8 October 2008, Nature Publishing Group, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited.

1

TAGS

2006 • added-value features • authorshipbibliography softwareCenter for History and New MediacitationcopyrightDan Cohen • data format • digital informationEndNoteGeorge Mason Universityinteroperabilityknowledge integrationlawsuitlevel playing fieldLinuxMicrosoft ExcelMicrosoft WindowsMicrosoft WordNature (journal) • open sharing • open sourceopen source filesopen source software • open standard format • open standards • OpenOffice • operating systemorganise and share • OS • ownershipproprietary • proprietary data formats • proprietary formats • proprietary software • researchersreverse engineering • science news • science policy • Sean Takatssoftwaretechnology • Thomson Reuters • trademark infringment • Zotero

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
28 JULY 2010

Posterous: CMS for simple web publishing via email

"Posterous is the easy way to get content online using e–mail. You can e–mail content of just about any type (such as rich text, photos, music, video, Word/Powerpoint/Excel/PDF documents, and zip archives) to us. We will post it online in the most web–friendly format, then reply with a public URL that can be forwarded or shared with friends. Account creation is never required, but if a user does create an account, posts from your various e–mail addresses (work, home, and mobile phone) can all be integrated into one blog."

(Posterous, Inc.)

Fig.1 Susie Blackmon's Posterous weblog [available at: http://susieblackmon.com/].

1

TAGS

2008 • blog by email • bookmarkletCMScollectcontentdocumentsemailentrepreneurshipICTMicrosoft ExcelMS WordonlinePDFphotosPosterouspowerpointpublishingpublishing system • Redpoint Ventures • repositorysimplicitytechnology • Trinity Ventures • usabilityweb application • web-friendly • weblog • Y Combinator • zip

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 NOVEMBER 2009

Ebook Search Engine

1

TAGS

directoryDOCe-bookeBookindexknowledge managementMicrosoft ExcelPDF • PPT • searchtext • Toodoc • tool

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.