Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Collectivism' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 JANUARY 2016

Korean video gamers tend to play collectively (not individually)

"Indigenous video game culture creates a game space that Korean gamers use to construct their digital national identity. To Korean gamers, the concept of a digital Korea represents an imaginary space of Korean community where people play games together. Unlike gamers in the United States and Japan, whose gaming experience tends to be individualized, Korea's indigenous video game culture represents a new form of youth culture that allows young gamers to engage in social interaction through gaming with friends at PC Bangs. In this culture, entertainment happens at the moment when gamers are able to 'shout and play games together.' [29] This experience of social gaming creates a particular taste of gameplay that also leads to further immersion in a gaming narrative particular to most Korean gamers (Ok 2011). It is said that Korea is a mad gaming nation (Ahonen and O'Reilly 2007), and the country has the highest penetration rate for a single online game; 12 million South Koreans have driven a car in the Nexon online game Crazyracing Kartrider (2004). In addition to social gameplay within the Korean community, nation-building sentiments also arise in the context of Korean player-killing, where Korean gamers engage in social gaming on the international servers of an online game. [30] Thomas (2008) describes such gameplay as a cultural location that reflects existing racial tensions between Korean and American gamers. Similarly, political tension also appeared in a game massacre event, when Chinese gamers hacked into a Korean server and sparked mass killing between Chinese and Korean gamers in Legend of Mir II (2001).

On a macro level, gaming as a national pastime can be seen in the rapid spread of e-sports in all aspects of Korean society, and this e-sport culture is an indigenous gaming culture that receives support from the government, media institutions, and passionate gamers. E-sports have become recognized as an international sports phenomenon with their origins in Korea. With their emphasis on professional gamers, they have also become an emerging new media phenomenon, an international spectacle in video games (Jin 2010)."

(Mark J. P. Wolf, p.509)

Wolf, M. J. P. (2015). "Video Games Around the World", The MIT Press.

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TAGS

2015 • Chinese gamer • collective behaviourcollectivism • Crazyracing Kartrider • cultural location • digital national identity • e-sport culture • e-sports • game massacre event • gameplaygames research • gaming experience • gaming narrative • gaming nation • Hye Ryoung Ok • imaginary spacesimmersion • indigenous gaming culture • indigenous video game culture • international sports phenomenon • Jim OReilly • Korean community • Korean gamer • Korean society • LAN gaming • Legend of Mir 2 • Mark Wolf • mass collaboration • mass killing • multiplayer computer games • nation-building • national pastime • new media phenomenon • PC bang • people play games together • play games together • political tension • professional gamer • racial tensions • shared context • social gameplay • social gaming • social interaction • social interaction through gaming • South Korea • Tomi Ahonen • video game culture • youth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 JULY 2014

The Fountainhead: a testament to uncompromising individualism

"The work of Rand, most of it published between the 1940s and 1960s, was very popular in the United States and gained a large and still active following. Rand developed her own school of philosophy called Objectivism, that centers on the principle of selfishness. In her novels and philosophical works, Rand advocates a form of rational and ethical egoism, and a political order based on laissezfaire capitalism. Her two novels, Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) are lengthy portrayals of strong individuals who heroically and steadfastly pursue their lives according to Rand's philosophical principles."

(P.W. Zuidhof, p.84, 2012)

Zuidhof, P. W. (2012). "Ayn Rand: Fountainhead of neoliberalism?" Krisis: Journal for contemporary philosophy(1).

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TAGS

19431949American dreamarchitect • artistic vision • Atlas ShruggedAyn Rand • battle of wills • challenging conventionscollectivismcompromiseconventionalitycreative geniusdesign commissioningdesign conventions • Edward Carrere • egoegoism • ethical egoism • fear of failure • form and function • form follows function • Frank Lloyd Wrightfree willfunctionalism • Gary Cooper • Howard Roark • human actionidealism • independent-mindedness • individualism • integrity • International Styleisolated sort of geniuslaissez faire capitalismLe CorbusierLudwig Mies van der Rohemelodramamodernist architecturemodernist idealsmoral purposeneoliberalismnewspaper tycoonnon-conformistobjectivismoptimistic idealPatricia Neal • personal integrity • personal visionpowerquestioning traditionsradical architecture • rational egoism • rational self-interest • rise to power • romantic notion of the artist • rousing speech • self-interestselfishnessskyscraper • smear campaign • struggle in obscurity • The Fountainhead • uncompromising integrity • uncompromising vision • weak-mindedness • William Kueh

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 DECEMBER 2013

Open Social Learning: I store my knowledge with my friends

Fig.1 Stephen Downes 2009 presentation "The Role of Open Educational Resources in Personal Learning", VI International Seminar on Open Social Learning of the UOC UNESCO Chair in e–Learning.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 AUGUST 2005

Indian Documentary: representing the collective

"Traditionally Indian documentary has emphasised the collective rather than the individual and thus has eschewed personal perspectives. As Tom Waugh has characterised it, the Indian documentary tradition overwhelmingly favoured the didactic social documentary in the Griersonian mode; such a documentary approach was prevalent during the first four decades after independence in 1947.[1] In the 80s, Indian documentarists moved towards the direct cinema style prevalent in the West in the 60s, adopting its realist aesthetic and reliance on interviews while continuing to retain Greirsonian voice–over narration. However, as Waugh points out, in contrast to Western documentaries – emphasis on individual protagonists, Indian films relied on the collective in representing its subject, including the collective interview. In place of the private home was the street. Waugh contextualises this formal aspect of documentary in the cultural, political, and economic imperatives of a post colonial society. Within this social formation and political orientation, the group rather than the individual and public spaces rather than private ones become the primary sites of political discourse and cultural expression."
(Jyotsna Kapur)

Kapur, J. (2003). 'Why the personal is still political – some lessons from contemporary Indian documentary.'Jump Cut: A Review of Contemporary Media 23.

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TAGS

Amar Kanwar • collectivecollectivismcommunityconfessiondirect cinemadocumentaryIndiainterviewJohn Grierson • Pankaj Rishi Kumar • politicsrepresentation • social ideology • Tom Waugh • traditionWestern
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