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Which clippings match 'Philip K. Dick' keyword pg.1 of 1
09 NOVEMBER 2013

Design Fiction, Science Fiction and Literary Criticism

"Design Fiction is a recent spin–off of Science Fiction, directly inspired by many of the imagined worlds of writers like Bruce Sterling, William Gibson, J.G. Ballard and others. It sets out to do many of the same things as Sci–Fi does, but in a more concrete way, by introducing real physical objects or real sets of rules and scenarios which require the participation (direct or indirect, voluntary or involuntary) of users, beyond just their emotional and intellectual engagement. In this way Design Fiction can 'test' objects or tools or storylines that Science Fiction, until recently, has not been able to. A literary work, has (in general) been a fixed text until very recently, and so even though readers have enjoyed many different readings and interpretations, the author has not been able to adapt or react to their responses. Design Fiction allows the inventor or storytellers to adapt their scenario as it evolves and as the users or participants give their reactions."

(Charles Beckett, How to Think About The Future)

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TAGS

alternative possible futures • Bruce Sterling • conscious metaphor • design fictiondigital technologyfictional setting • future speculation • future technologiesfuturologyInanimate AliceJ G Ballard • Jake Dugarden • Julian Bleeckerliterary criticismMichio Kaku • nascent practice • Near Future Laboratory • PerplexCity (project) • Philip K. Dickphilosophical questionsPhysics of the Impossible (2008)prototypingSascha Pohfleppsci-fi • sci-fi science • science fictionspeculative designspeculative physicsspeculative prototypesStar TrekStar Warstest concepts • test out • test your ideas • what-if scenarios • William Gibson • World Without Oil (project)

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
09 NOVEMBER 2003

Minority Report: pre-crime and information integrity

"In futuristic Washington, D.C., a system is established that can accurately predict when criminals are going to commit murder or violent crimes. This system, known as 'Pre–Crime', was set up by the respectable Lamar Burgess (Max von Sydow) and uses the abilities of a set of 3 special individuals known as 'Pre–Cogs'. These individuals, through visions or dreams, can see into the future and give a prediction of when a violent crime will occur, usually accurate to the second.

However, John Anderton (Tom Cruise), the head of 'Pre–Crime', is envisioned to have committed the future murder of a man he has never met before, and before he can be apprehended, he sets out headstrong to solve the mystery of this murder before it inevitably happens. As precious time ticks away, and consistencies with the 'pre–cog' visions become more and more prevalent, Anderton realises that the only way he will be able to solve the mystery, is to get the 'minority report' from the female pre–cog Agatha (Samantha Morton).

The 'minority report' is a vision that only one of the pre–cogs can see. In the system, all 3 pre–cogs see the same vision the vast majority of the time, however, on occasion, the female Agatha, who has been found to be the most talented of the 3, sees something different than the other 2, but this is usually disregarded in order to preserve the credibility of the system."

(Kim Bartlett)

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TAGS

2002authority • clairvoyance • controlcrime fictiondatadisciplineethical contextextrasensory perceptionfuturisticgesture devicehaptic interface • information integrity • lawMax von SydowMinority Reportmonitoringmulti-touch screenpanopticon • parapsychological phenomena • Philip K. Dick • pre-cog • pre-crime • pre-visualisation • predict • prisonprisoner • psychic detective • punishmentregulation • Samantha Morton • sci-fispeculative designSteven Spielberg • Tom Cruise • truthvisualisation
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