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Which clippings match 'Research Methodology' keyword pg.1 of 3
15 MARCH 2015

Three Approaches to Qualitative Content Analysis

"Content analysis is a widely used qualitative research technique. Rather than being a single method, current applications of content analysis show three distinct approaches: conventional, directed, or summative. All three approaches are used to interpret meaning from the content of text data and, hence, adhere to the naturalistic paradigm. The major differences among the approaches are coding schemes, origins of codes, and threats to trustworthiness. In conventional content analysis, coding categories are derived directly from the text data. With a directed approach, analysis starts with a theory or relevant research findings as guidance for initial codes. A summative content analysis involves counting and comparisons, usually of keywords or content, followed by the interpretation of the underlying context. The authors delineate analytic procedures specific to each approach and techniques addressing trustworthiness with hypothetical examples drawn from the area of end-of-life care."

(Hsiu-Fang Hsieh, Sarah E. Shannon, 2005)

TAGS

2005coding categoriescoding schemescontent analysisconventional content analysis • counting and comparisons • delineate analytic procedures • directed approach • end-of-life care • Hsiu-Fang Hsieh • humanities researchhumanities research methodology • hypothetical examples • interpret meaning • naturalistic paradigm • origins of codes • qualitative researchqualitative research technique • relevant research findings • research methodology • Sarah Shannon • social science research • social science research methodology • summative content analysis • text data • threats to trustworthiness • trustworthiness

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MARCH 2015

Chapter 2: Doing Research in the Real World by David Gray

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TAGS

2009action research • analytical surveys • constructivismcritical enquiry • David Gray • deductive reasoning • descriptive studies • epistemological perspectives • epistemologyethnography • exploratory studies • feminismhermeneutics • heuristic enquiry • inductive and deductive reasoning • inductive reasoning • interpretive studies • interpretivismJohn DeweymethodologyMichael Crottymultiple methods • naturalistic enquiry • objectivism • ontological perspectives • ontology • phenomenological research • phenomenologypositivismpostmodernismpragmatismrealismresearch approachesresearch methodologiesresearch methodologyresearch methods • research perspectives • research strategiessubjectivismsymbolic interactionismtheoretical perspectives

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
11 DECEMBER 2013

Divining a Digital Future - Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell

"Ubiquitous computing (or 'ubicomp') is the label for a 'third wave' of computing technologies. Following the eras of the mainframe computer and the desktop PC, ubicomp is characterized by small and powerful computing devices that are worn, carried, or embedded in the world around us. The ubicomp research agenda originated at Xerox PARC in the late 1980s; these days, some form of that vision is a reality for the millions of users of Internet–enabled phones, GPS devices, wireless networks, and 'smart' domestic appliances. In Divining a Digital Future, computer scientist Paul Dourish and cultural anthropologist Genevieve Bell explore the vision that has driven the ubiquitous computing research program and the contemporary practices that have emerged––both the motivating mythology and the everyday messiness of lived experience.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of the authors' collaboration, the book takes seriously the need to understand ubicomp not only technically but also culturally, socially, politically, and economically. Dourish and Bell map the terrain of contemporary ubiquitous computing, in the research community and in daily life; explore dominant narratives in ubiquitous computing around such topics as infrastructure, mobility, privacy, and domesticity; and suggest directions for future investigation, particularly with respect to methodology and conceptual foundations."

Paul Dourish and Genevieve Bell (2011). "Divining a Digital Future: Mess and Mythology in Ubiquitous Computing", MIT Press, May 2011, ISBN 978–0–262–01555–4.

TAGS

1980s2011computer sciencecomputingcontemporary practices • contemporary ubiquitous computing • cultural anthropologydaily lifedesktop computer • desktop PC • Divining a Digital Future (book) • domesticity • embedded in the world around us • everyday messiness • feature phone • future investigation • Genevieve Bell • GPS devices • infrastructureinterdisciplinary collaboration • internet-enabled phones • lived experiencemainframemobility • Paul Dourish • privacyresearch communityresearch methodology • small and powerful computing devices • smart domestic appliances • smart phones • third wave of computing technologies • ubicomp • ubicomp research • ubiquitous computing • ubiquitous computing research • wireless networkswornXerox PARC

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
09 JANUARY 2013

Big Data: Text Mining in the Digital Humanities

"Not surprisingly the focus on research methodology in the presentations was also explicitly articulated as an important aspect of drawing out a scholarly practice for the Digital Humanities. It was emphasized that the disclosure of the philosophical and technological rational behind a research methodology is important to develop a sort of academic accountability. These methodological choices are deliberate and meaningfully affect the results of a study.

The rigorous process of explaining and justifying the methodological process is in effect a safe guard against spurious use of computational and statistical tools. 'Big Data' will not allow for humanistic arguments to be proved statistically. Instead it is about producing a dialectic between analytic and anecdotal, such that the computational tools of computers can be assimilated into the process of humanistic scholarship. An important aspect of this is to develop meaningful visualizations to render data readable."

(Mark Turcato, 18 May 2012, Digital Humanities McGill)

TAGS

academic accountability • affect the results of a study • analytic • anecdotal • big data • computational tools • computational tools of computers • data analysis • deliberate and meaningfully • dialectic between analytic and anecdotal • digital humanitiesdisclosure • explaining and justifying • humanistic • humanistic arguments • humanistic scholarship • McGill University • meaningful visualisations • methodological choices • methodological process • philosophical rational • process of humanistic scholarship • proved statistically • render data readable • research methodology • rigorous process • rigourrobustness • safeguard • scholarly practice • spurious use • statistical analysis • statistical tools • technological rationa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 DECEMBER 2012

How to design your research project

"What are your beliefs about how valid knowledge can be obtained? This will influence your approach to your research. If you are a positivist, for example, (who believes that valid knowledge can be obtained through a scientific approach), you are likely to choose a quantitative research method that begins with a theory and tests that theory. If you favour the social constructivist view that meaning is subjective, gained through interactions with others, you would be more likely to choose qualitative research methods that explores themes. Qualitative research is about generating theory and finding patterns of meaning."

(Centre for Academic Development and Quality, Nottingham Trent University)

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TAGS

Abbas Tashakkori • Anthony Onwuegbuzie • audiencebeliefs • Centre for Academic Development and Quality • data collection • epistemological approach • epistemological beliefs • epistemologyethical considerationsethical issues • existing theory • experimental designs • generating theory • interactions with others • John Creswell • Journal of Mixed Methods Research • Judith Bell • Mark Weinstein • Martyn Denscombe • Matt Henn • meaning is subjective • mixed methods • mixed methods research • new knowledge • new research methods • new theory • Nick Foard • non-experimental design • patterns of meaningpositivistqualitative research • quantitative research methods • research • research aims • research approachresearch contributionresearch designresearch disseminationresearch methodologyresearch projectresearch questions • research theory • scientific approach • social constructivistsocial sciencetriangulationvalid knowledge

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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