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Which clippings match 'Guy Debord' keyword pg.1 of 2
22 NOVEMBER 2015

Questioning how we relate to the world in functional ways

"JODI's disruption of mapping and video games reminded me of Situationist artist Guy Debord's calls for a 'renovated cartography.' For Debord, when we blindly follow the same directions over and over, using the easiest paths, we get stuck relating to the world in 'functional' ways and imagination withers. Debord wanted people to use the wrong map in the wrong place — to get lost in order that we might see our surroundings anew. Similarly, JODI strips away the usual instrumental goals of our engagements with digital media — to win a game, to communicate information, to navigate quickly. What we are left with is a bare awareness of the random components of our digital lives and a glimpse at the other possibilities for technology."

(Leila Nadir, 30 April 2012, Museum of the Moving Image)

TAGS

2012agency of access and engagementcartographycontrolled environments • designing for playful engagement • Dirk Paesmansdisruptive interrogation • diversity of engagement • exploratory experimentation • exploring other possibilities for technology • functional purpose • getting lost • Guy Debordinstructions for useinstrumental conception of technologyInternet artJoan HeemskerkJODI (art collective)Museum of the Moving Imageour digital livesperformativity • questioning our uses of technology • relating to the world in functional ways • renovated cartography • rethinking boundaries • scriptible spaces • seeing our surroundings anew • Situationist Internationalsymbolic controlunfolding possibilitiesvideo games

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 JANUARY 2014

100+ Years of Design Manifestos

"Since the days of radical printer–pamphleteers, design and designers have a long history of fighting for what's right and working to transform society. The rise of the literary form of the manifesto also parallels the rise of modernity and the spread of letterpress printing. ...

The original list was largely drawn from Mario Piazza's presentation at the Più Design Può conference in Florence, though I've edited and added to it. I've also incorporated links where I was able to find them."

(John Emerson, 22 July 2009, Social Design Notes)

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TAGS

Albe Steiner • Alberto Marangoni • Allan Chochinov • anti-manifesto • Antonio Sant Elia • architectureArts and Crafts MovementBauhaus School • Blair Enns • Bruce MauBruce SterlingBruno TautDanish designDe Stijl • Dean Allen • design manifesto • Dieter RamsDogme 95El Lissitzky • Ellen Lupton • Filippo Tommaso MarinettiFuturism • Gelsomino DAmbrosio • Giancarlo Iliprandi • Gianfranco Torri • Giovanni Anceschi • Giovanni Baule • Giovanni Lussu • GNUgood designgraphic designGuy DebordIcogradainfographicsJeffrey Zeldman • Karim Rashid • Kathleen Hanna • Ken Garland • Laszlo Moholy-Nagyletterpress printing • literary form • manifestoManuel Lima • Mario Piazza • Mark Goldman • Marke Hamburg • Michael Erard • Mitch Goldstein • Noah Scalin • pamphleteer • Patrik Schumacher • Pierre Bernard • Pino Grimaldi • publishing • radical rethinking • Scandinavian Design Council • Society of the Spectacle (Guy Debord)typography • Umair Haque • un-manifesto • Walter Gropius • Warren Berger • William McDonough • William Morris

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
11 JULY 2013

Isidore Isou's influential Venom and Eternity

"This experimental film ('Venom and Eternity') by Isidore Isou constitutes the Letterist manifesto of film. Rejecting film conventions by 'chiseling' away at them, Isou introduced several new concepts, including discrepancy cinema where the sound track has nothing to do with the visual track. In addition, the celluloid itself was attacked with destructive techniques such as scratches and washing it in bleach. Causing a scandal at the 1951 Cannes Film Festival, this film was later introduced in the United States where it influenced avant–garde film makers such as Stan Brakhage."

(Internet Archive)

Fig.1 Isidore Isou (1951). Traité de bave et d'éternité. Venom And Eternity.

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TAGS

1951 • anarchism • artistic expressionavant-garde cinemaavant-garde film maker • bleach • celluloidcinema • cinema is dead • cinematic conventionsconventionsdeath of cinemadeath of the authordeface • destructive techniques • discrepancy cinema • Eric Rohmer • experimental filmformal workformalismGuy Debord • influential practitioners • influential worksInternet Archive • Isidore Isou • Jean Cocteau • letterist manifesto • lettrism • lettrist movement • Maurice Scherer • rejectionRomanian • Romanian filmmaker • scratches • situationism • situationistStan Brakhagestock footagesync sound • Venom and Eternity (1951)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2012

The Revival of Psychogeography

"Psychogeography is hot. Guy Debord, founding member of Situationist International and the man who coined the term in 1955, defined the phenomenon as 'the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals'. In fact, psychogeography is the art of strolling, or just about anything that gets pedestrians off their predictable paths and leads them to a new awareness of the urban landscape. Recently we've seen a remarkable psychogeographic revival driven by several artistic urban projects and smartphone applications."

(Jeroen Beekmans, 4 January 2012, The Pop–Up City)

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TAGS

1955 • Adam Greenfield • Android appsappsart • art of strolling • artistic urban project • augmented reality • augmented sound • awarenesscitydaily routinederivedrift • Emilie Giles • encountersenvironmentescapeexploration • exploring the city • flaneur • forgotten places • geographical environment • Guy Debord • Inception app • Ingrid Burrington • interactive encounters • iPhoneiPhone app • iPhone apps • iPod Touch • Loneliness Map • lonely individuals • Lost London • mapmapping • missed connections • new technologiesperception of realityperformativityphenomena • Pratt Manhattan Gallery • predictable cities • psychogeographic experiences • psychogeographic explorations • psychogeographypublic spacerealityroute • Serendipitor • serendipitySituationist International • smartphone applications • smartphone apps • strollersurprisetechnology • unpredictable paths • urban landscapeurban mappingurban planningyou are here

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 FEBRUARY 2011

The evolution of Postmodernism

"On the way to postmodern, the struggle to reform modern capitalism's dark side, fragmented into a thousand strands. An era approach is rejected – dating the arrival of postmodernism is impossible as is the construction of a linear episodic narrative, moving from the premodern to the modern and then to postmodern. Instead postmodern methods, theories, and worldviews proliferate, as do modern and premodern ones. There are numerous postmodern approaches ranging from naive postmodernism (McPostmodernism) that hails the arrival of postindustrial and complex/adaptive organizations, Baudrillard's and Lyotard's versions of radical breaks from modernity, to others seeking more integration with critical theory. Some claim to have moved beyond postmodern to something called postpostmodern that would include hybrids (postmodern variants with modern and premodern), language 'heteroglossia' (the coexistence of many voices at the same time in tension with each other), and various 'dark side postmoderns' looking at global reterritorialization, postmodern war, postcolonialism and the ills of capitalism"

(David M. Boje, 2007)

1). Postmodernism – by David M. Boje (2007) To appear in Yiannis Gabriel's Thesaurus, London: Oxford University Press, forthcoming

TAGS

Bruno Latourcapitalismconsumption spectaclecritical theorycritiquedeconstruction • Douglas Kellner • episodic narrative • Fredric Jameson • Gibson Burrell • grand narrativesGulf WarGuy Debordheteroglossia • history of philosophy • iPodJacques DerridaJean BaudrillardJean-Francois LyotardJurgen HabermaslanguageLas Vegas • Linda Smircich • Marta B Calas • McDonalds • McPostmodernism • Michel FoucaultmodernismmodernityNietzscheNikePeter Druckerpost-structuralismpostindustrialPostmodernpostmodernismpremodernreterritorialisation • Steven Best • Stewart R. Clegg • Vietnam war • Wal-Mart • William Bergquist • World War IWorld War II

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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