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Which clippings match 'The Economist' keyword pg.1 of 1
05 APRIL 2014

What is skeuomorphism?

Dan "O'Hara argues that, strictly speaking, the term skeuomorphism refers only to those vestigial elements in nature or artefact that survive from an original form, even though they are no longer required. At its broadest, this definition extends to the levers and dials in a modern aircraft cockpit, for example, which no longer connect to systems directly, but instead are merely inputs and outputs of a computer that actually controls things. Such controls are skeumorphs because they are holdovers from the days before computerised aircraft, and have been left in their original form for the benefit of pilots, who are used to them working in a particular way.

So can a digital depiction of something properly be called a skeuomorph? It is more accurate to refer to it as a visual metaphor that calls to mind a physical skeuomorph without really being one. The iPhone's notification panel, with its imitation linen effect, was not descended from an object that was once made of linen. The switch that, say, allows you to switch an iPhone into Airplane Mode is not an on–screen replacement for what used to be a physical switch. In the early days of graphical user interfaces, designers employed familiar devices, such as folders, trash cans and other objects commonplace in the office. The result was that operating systems ended up being littered with depictions of things that had never existed inside a digital device; the on–screen 'trash' icon is not the vestigial remnant of an actual trash can that was once part of the computer, which is why it is really a metaphor, not a skeumorph. (That said, as computer graphics became more detailed, the original blocky icons gave way to more detailed depictions of trash cans, folders and so forth, which are arguably skeuomorphs of visual metaphors.)"

(Glenn Fleishman, 25 June 2013, The Economist)

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TAGS

1889 • actual object • Apple • Apple iOS 7 • archaeologyauthenticitycomputer graphicscultural materialism • Dan OHara • digital depiction • familiar devices • faux leather • faux wood panelling • folder • Glenn Fleishman • graphical user interface • holdover • imitation • iOS 7 • metaphor • Microsoft Windows 8 • Microsoft Windows Phone 7 • nostalgiaobsolescence • on-screen replacement • on-screen textures • operating systemornamental designornamental form • physical skeuomorph • romanticism • Scott Forstall • skeumorph • skeuomorphskeuomorphic designskeuomorphismThe Economisttrash can • vestigial remnant • visual depictionvisual metaphor • visual representations • visual simulation • Windows 8 interface • Windows Phone 7 • wood panelling

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2013

Austin Kleon: Steal Like An Artist

"Austin Kleon's talk 'Steal Like An Artist' is a creative manifesto based on 10 things he wish he'd heard when he was starting out. Austin is a writer and artist. He's the author of Newspaper Blackout, a best–selling book of poetry made by redacting newspaper articles with a permanent marker. Austin's talk was delivered as part of the TEDxKC presentation of TEDxChange. Austin's work (including his new book) 'Steal Like An Artist' has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition, PBS Newshour, and in The Wall Street Journal. He speaks about creativity, visual thinking, and being an artist online for organizations such as SXSW and The Economist."

(TEDx Talk, 2012, Kansas City)

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TAGS

2012 • Austin Kleon • authorshipBrion Gysin • Caleb Whitefoord • citation as a form of persuasionclipping • creative lineage • creative manifesto • creativitycreditingcultural productioncut-up techniqueDavid Bowieeditingephemeralerasure • genealogy of ideas • history of ideasIgor Stravinsky • marker pen • mash-up • newspaper blackout • newspaper clipping • nothing is originalNPRobliteratePablo PicassoPBS • permanent marker • redacted • redaction • remix culturesteal from anywhere • SXSW • TED Talks • TEDxChange • TEDxKC • The Economist • Tom Phillips • Tristan Tzaravisual thinkingWall Street Journal

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Scientific publishing: the price of information

"On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top–ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics's equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow–mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers's post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier's journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands. ...

Dr Neylon's petition, though, is symptomatic of a wider conflict between academics and their publishers–a conflict that is being thrown into sharp relief by the rise of online publishing. Academics, who live in a culture which values the free and easy movement of information (and who edit and referee papers for nothing) have long been uncomfortable bedfellows with commercial publishing companies, which want to maximise profits by charging for access to that information, and who control many (although not all) of the most prestigious scientific journals."

(Feb 4th 2012, The Economist)

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TAGS

academicacademic journalacademicsboycott • bundling • Cambridge University • Cell (journal) • Elsevier (publisher) • free access • free and easy movement of information • funded researchgift culture • Lancet (journal) • libraries • Nick Fowler • online publishing • petition • prestigious • publicationpublisherpublishers • publishing companies • referee papers • Research Works Act • scientific journals • subscribe • taxpayer-funded research • The EconomistTimothy Gowers • Tyler Neylon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 APRIL 2010

Redesigning Business Summit: how design thinking will aid the recovery

"When the old ideas stop working, business must find new ones. So is the current economic slowdown a fantastic opportunity for design?

To find out, the Design Council and The Economist brought leaders from business and design together at a major conference in March 2010. ...

In this short film Robin Bew, Chief Economist of the Economist Intelligence Unit, and Sir George Cox, Former Chairman of the Design Council, discuss how design thinking will aid the recovery."

(Design Council, UK)

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TAGS

2010businessconferencecreative economycreative industriesdesignDesign Council (UK)design thinkingeconomic recovery • economic slowdown • enterpriseentrepreneurshipGeorge Coxknowledge-based economyRDA • Redesigning Business Summit • Robin Bew • The Big Rethink (conference) • The EconomistUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2009

Shift Happens Revisited: Do You Know 4.0 - Convergence and Social Media

"This is another official update to the original 'Shift Happens' video. This completely new [Autumn] 2009 version includes facts and stats focusing on the changing media landscape, including convergence and technology, and was developed in partnership with The Economist."

(Xplane and The Economist)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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