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24 MARCH 2017

MIT Open Documentary Lab: documentary is a project rather than a genre bound to a particular medium

"Drawing on MIT's legacy of media innovation and its deep commitment to open and accessible information, the MIT Open Documentary Lab brings storytellers, technologists, and scholars together to explore new documentary forms with a particular focus on collaborative, interactive, and immersive storytelling. The Lab understands documentary as a project rather than as a genre bound to a particular medium: documentary offers ways of exploring, representing, and critically engaging the world. It explores the potentials of emerging technologies and techniques to enhance the documentary project by including new voices, telling new stories and reaching new publics. ...

If we are indeed witnessing the emergence of a new form of representation, what can we broker from past moments of change to facilitate our move into the future? How can we evaluate this new work – what descriptive terminology and frameworks for assessment are most useful? What trends can we discern? What are the implications for style, authorship and the craft of filmmaking of these collaboratively sourced and edited moving images? And how can we work with our funding agencies, exhibition venues, and archival systems to give these new and often challenging practices a place in our cultural register?"

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collaborative storytellingdigital storytellingdocumentary experimentsdocumentary filmmakingdocumentary formdocumentary practice • documentary research • documentary series • emerging techniques • emerging technologiesfilmmakinghybrid formsimmersive storytellinginteractive documentary • interactive factual • interactive storytelling • media innovation • media maker • MIT Open Documentary Lab • new documentary forms • new publics • new stories • new voices • open and accessible information • reality-based storytelling • storytelling forms • the documentary subject • transmedia meta-documentary

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JUNE 2015

i-Docs: website of this emerging interactive documentary form

"You will find a number of definitions and points-of-view on what constitutes an interactive documentary. At this point in the development of this fast-moving field we feel that it is important to have an expansive definition that can embrace the many different kinds of work that are emerging. The i-Docs site includes coverage of projects that you may find elsewhere described as web-docs, transmedia documentaries, serious games, cross-platform docs, locative docs, docu-games, pervasive media. For us any project that starts with an intention to document the 'real' and that does so by using digital interactive technology can be considered an i-doc. What unites all these projects is this intersection between digital interactive technology and documentary practice. Where these two things come together, the audience become active agents within documentary – making the work unfold through their interaction and often contributing content. If documentary is about telling stories about our shared world; we are interested in what happens as the audience get more closely involved in this way. At the heart of i-Docs is the question; what opportunities emerge as documentary becomes something that is co-created?"

(Digital Cultures Research Centre at University of the West of England)

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2011 • active agents • active audienceBristolco-creator-ship • cross-platform docs • design for the screen • Digital Cultures Research Centre • digital storytelling • docu-games • docufiction • document the real • documentary formdocumentary practicedocumentary truthhybrid formshypermediai-Doc • i-Docs project • interactive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive multimediainteractive storytelling • Jon Dovey • Judith Aston • locative docs • online multimedia • our shared world • pervasive media • Sandra Gaudenzi • serious gamestheir stories • transmedia documentaries • University of the West of England • UWE Bristol • web-based documentary • web-docs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 DECEMBER 2014

BBC launches new interactive drama Footballers United

"Footballers United features five chapters which consist of video, audio, image and text content, with the overall experience being around 60 minutes. Archived content is presented by well-known football player Gemma Fay, Captain and Goalkeeper of the Scottish National Women's Football team. ...

Audience interaction: Each part of the story is a standalone piece of content which is shareable online. A clever interactive timeline prompts the audience to access related archive content, such as images, text and video. When selected, this content appears as an overlay on the screen, with the drama paused in the background.

For a more personal experience the audience can sign in via Facebook and the timeline maps events in WW1 to their social media graph; showing how their friends and a modern day social community would have fared throughout the war. For example, when the viewer pass the first day of the Somme in the drama, a social item will appear that shows the number of their friends that would have lost their lives had they been in the battle at the time."

(BBC Media Centre, 11 December 2014)

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2014 • a whole generation • Alex Winckler • archive footageaudience interactionBBC History • BBC Learning • BBC Taster • changes for women • changing lives • creative nonfiction • culture change • curated content • devastating effects • digital storytelling • docu-fiction • docufictionEdinburghexpository addendum • factual format • factually accurate narrative • fictional and archived content • football player • football teamFootballers United (2014) • Gemma Fay • Heart of Midlothian (football team) • historical drama • Holly Jack • interactive digital narrativesinteractive dramainteractive features • interactive guide • interactive mediainteractive storytellinginteractive timeline • iWonder • Keiran Gallacher • Leah Byrne • linear drama • literary nonfiction • multimedia storytelling • narrative nonfiction • new responsibilities • new sense of freedom • online multimedia • playing football • related archive content • Robert Armitage • Scotland • Scottish National Womens Football • supporting content • Tim Wright • timeline • true story • World War Iyoung people

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
26 NOVEMBER 2014

Never Alone: Could a Video Game Help to Preserve Inuit Culture?

"'Kunuuksaayuka,' an Iñupiaq tale that was recounted by the late Iñupiaq storyteller Robert Nasruk Cleveland. In its traditional incarnation, the tale recounts the adventures of a boy – the product of a nomadic society – who goes on a quest to save his community from an apocalyptic blizzard. After securing the consent of Cleveland’s daughter, Minnie Aliitchask Gray, the development team in conjunction with representatives from the Iñupiat community reworked the story until they settled on a script that would become the basis for 'Never Alone.' (The game’s Iñupiaq sub-title, 'Kisima Ingitchuna,' translates to 'I am Not Alone.')".

(Simon Parkin, 17 November 2014, The New Yorker)

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2014adventure gameAlaskaAlaska Native peoplearctic circle • arctic fox • atmospheric presence • aurora borealis • backstory • Black River People • blizzard • call on spirits • coldcompanion charactercontemporary interpretation • Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) • cultural heritage • cultural insights • cultural myths • cultural traditions • cultural translation • digital storytelling • E-Line Media • endless blizzard • engaged learning • environment as antagonistfemale protagonist • folkloric fantasy characters • folktale • foxindie gamesIndigenous peopleinteractive playInuit • Inupiaq • Kisima Ingitchuna (video game) • Kunuuksaayuka • magical bola • Minnie Gray • native tribes • Never Alone (video game) • nomadic cultures • nomadic people • Nuna (character) • oral traditionpuzzle platformer • Robert Nasruk Cleveland • Sean Vesce • spiritsSteamsurvival storyThe New Yorker • traditional art • treacherous landscape • Upper One Games • video gamevideo games and Indigenous peoplewind

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2014

Examples of web based non-linear narratives

Bear 71 (2012); Clouds over Cuba (2012); Donnie Darko (film website); Gravity (2003) by Olia Lialina; Here at Home (webdoc); My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (1996) by Olia Lialina; Neon Bible (2007) by Arcade Fire; Prison Valley (2013); Random Paths (2001) by Jody Zellen; Telescopic Text (interactive); The (Former) General in his Labyrinth (2007); The 21 Steps (2008) by Charles Cumming; The Wilderness Downtown (2011) by Arcade Fire; Waterlife (2009); We Choose the Moon (2009); Welcome to Pine Point (2011).

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Aaron Koblinalternate reality gameArcade Fire • Arcade Fire (band) • archive footage • B-Reel (digital production company) • Banff National Park • Bear 71 (2012) • Charles Cumming • Chris Milk • Clouds over Cuba (2012) • Cuban Missile Crisis • David Dufresne • digital storytelling • Donnie Darko (film website) • Google Maps • Gravity (2003) • grizzly bear • Here at Home (webdoc) • hypermediainteractive digital narrativesinteractive documentaryinteractive experienceinteractive mediainteractive multimedia documentaryinteractive multimedia video • interactive online story • interactive storytellinginteractive web documentary • Jeremy Mendes • Jody Zellen • Joe Davis • Kevin McMahon • Leanne Allison • Michael Simons • Mohsin Hamid • My Boyfriend Came Back from the War (1996) • narrative nonfictionNational Film Board of Canada • Neon Bible (2007) • new mediaNFB • non-linear narrative • Olia Lialina • Paul Shoebridge • Philippe Brault • Prison Valley (2013) • Random Paths (2001) • Telescopic Text (interactive) • The (Former) General in his Labyrinth (2007) • The 21 Steps (2008) • The Wilderness Downtown (2011) • Tool of North America • travelogue • Waterlife (2009) • We Choose the Moon (2009) • We Tell Stories • web based non-linear narrativesweb documentarywebdoc • Welcome to Pine Point (2011)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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