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Which clippings match 'Gestalt Principles' keyword pg.1 of 2
22 AUGUST 2013

Tim Brown: advocating a universal typography

"The web is universal, so we should practice a typography that is equally universal. By focusing on traditional typographic principles, embracing progressive enhancement, and understanding how fonts, CSS, web–enabled devices, and user contexts coexist, we can reevaluate what it means to successfully set type – and inform the decisions we make about typefaces, font sizes, and white space. Let's practice future–friendly, responsive typography."

via Deb Polson [http://livingdata.tumblr.com/post/58980870798/for–my–advanced–web–design–students–the–little]

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2012A List Apartbest practices • Chris Silverman • CSSDe Stijldesign conferencedesign craftdesign formalismErik SpiekermannFog of War • font size • gestalt principles • glyph • grid systems • historical developments • Jeffrey Veen • Jeffrey Zeldman • John Allsopp • Karen McGrane • Kevin Kellymark-up • modular scale • molten leading • page breakpoints • page design • pixel-perfect control • Ray Schwartz • Ready to Inspire (conference) • remediation • responsive typography • Ryan Singer • Theo van Doesburg • Thomas Phinney • Tim Brown • traditional practicestypetype foundrytypefacetypesettingtypographic principlestypographyuniversal principlesuser contextweb designwhitespace

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JUNE 2013

Sketch-thinking: the processes of 'seeing as' and 'seeing that'

"Sketches are obviously pictorial, for they refer to shape and orientation, and often to approximate size even if they maintain a varying degree of abstractness. Yet it is impossible to confirm that there is a direct one–to–one correspondence between shapes and figures on paper and the images they stand for. It is therefore proposed to refer to the (pictorial) reasoning evident in interactive imagery at the time of sketching as consisting of two modalities. The designer is 'seeing as' when he or she is using figural, or 'gestalt' argumentation while 'sketch–thinking'. When 'seeing that', the designer advances no figural arguments pertaining to the entity that is being designed. The process of sketching is a systematic dialectics between the 'seeing as' and 'seeing that' reasoning modalities. To examine this proposition, design moves and arguments were inspected as they are established through protocol analysis. The notion of 'seeing as' and 'seeing that' will be further elucidated as we proceed, so as to best exploit documentation from the protocols."

(Gabriela Goldschmidt 1991, p.131)

Goldschmidt, G. (1991). "The dialectics of sketching." Creativity Research Journal, Routledge 4(2): 123–143.

Fig.1 Donald Owen Colley [http://buttnekkiddoodles.com/2012/12/26/knockin–about–chicago/]

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1991abstract thinking • abstractness • concept developmentconcept generationconceptual schemeconceptualisation • concrete thinking • creativity research • Creativity Research Journal • design • design reasoning • design thinkingdrawingdrawing as enquiry • drawing research • drawing studiesdrawing study • figural • figural arguments • Gabriela Goldschmidt • gestalt argumentation • gestalt principlesidea generationinteractive imagery • Israel Institute of Technology • pictorial reasoning • problem-solvingprotocol analysis • reasoning modalities • reflexive technology • seeingseeing asseeing that • sequence of design moves • shape and orientation • sketch-thinkingsketchessketchingsketching ideas • systematic dialectics • visual thinking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 APRIL 2012

Principles of the Visual Language: A Dialect of Our Own Design

"A visual language informs all design, from architecture to print. Fluency in the same language drawn on by Bauhaus, mid–century Swiss, or postmodern design is essential for brilliant web design. In this practical talk, ground uniquely web–based interactions – from complex CSS3 animations and rotations to JavaScript behaviors – using that time–tested visual primer. Take a more considered approach to choices, evoke the desired emotive responses, learn how to better articulate your design decisions. Extend graphic design's grammar into a visual dialect of web design that guides us to smarter, beautifully balanced juxtapositions of elements in our new, multidimensional web experiences."

(Simon Collison)

Fig.1 Simon Collison (03 June 03 2011) "A Dialect of Our Own Design".

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aestheticsaffordances • articulate your design decisions • Bauhaus School • beautifully balanced • Christian Leborgcommunication design • considered approach • CSS3 • CSS3 animation • Dan Brown • design formalismDonald Normanediting through selection • emotive response • framegestalt principlesgraphic design • graphic design visual grammar • graphic representationgrid systemIndi YoungInternational Typographic StyleJavaScriptmapping • Mark Boulton • mental modelspictorial systemspostmodern designresponsive web designschema • Scott McCloud • Simon CollisonSlideShareSwiss Styletypographyvisual communication • visual dialect of web design • visual grammarvisual languagevisual screen designweb design • web experiences • web-based interactions • Wucius Wong

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MARCH 2012

The Gestalt Principles

"Gestalt is a psychology term which means 'unified whole'. It refers to theories of visual perception developed by German psychologists in the 1920s. These theories attempt to describe how people tend to organize visual elements into groups or unified wholes when certain principles are applied."

(Spokane Falls Community College)

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abstractionaesthetics • Berlin School • brain • closeness • closurecognitioncomplete formdesigndesign formalismdesign principlesdesign rules • entirety • essence • figure and ground • form and function • form-generating capability • gestalt effect • gestalt principlesgestalt psychology • gestalt theories • gestalt theories of perception • gestalt theory • gestaltism • graphic designgrouping • human eye • illusion • Kurt Koffka • layout designmodernismmodernist design principlesobjectivityperceptionperceptual organisationpictorial systemsprinciplesproximitypsychology • psychology of design • regularity • reificationrepetitionrulessensesshapesimilaritysymmetrytexturetheory of mindunified wholevisual communicationvisual designvisual illusionvisual literacyvisual perceptionvisual recognitionvisual rulewhole formswhole is greater than the sum of the partswhole is other than the sum of the partswhole situation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2009

Gestalt theory in visual screen design: a new look at an old subject

"Gestalt theory is a family of psychological theories, that have influenced many research areas since 1924, including visual design issues. Gestalt Theory is one of the foundations for instructional screen design. It is generally accepted that Gestalt theory may be used to improve educational screen design and thereby improve learning (Preece, Rogers, Sharp, Benyon, Holland and Carey1994). Gestalt Theories are usually expressed as laws, and there are many variants of Gestalt theory laws devised by different psychologists, for example Boring (1942) stated 'in 1933 Helson extracted 114 law of Gestalten. All but half a dozen of these laws are applicable to visual form.' Many of the laws are very closely related or overlap, and it is often very hard to distinguish between them. The Gestalt laws explain how the individual elements from the environment may be visually organised into fields or structures (Koffa 1935). Traditionally the Gestalt laws are used to suggest how static visual elements should be presented in order to achieve effective visual results.

We noticed that only very few Gestalt laws are commonly applied to instructional visual screen design (Fisher and Smith–Gratto 1998–99, Preece et al. 1994). Being curious people, we wondered if some important laws were generally overlooked, so we examined the Gestalt literature and selected the laws that appeared to be the most important for visual screen design, and combined similar ones together. Thus, we identified eleven distinct laws that represent the major aspects of Gestalt theory knowledge about visual form. These laws seemed to contain the most relevant aspects of Gestalt Theory for computer screen design.

To test the value of these principles we applied the eleven laws of Gestalt to the visual redesign of an educational multimedia program, WoundCare, and then evaluated the redesigned application and examined the educational value of using the Gestalt laws in the screen design process. This paper is an account of how useful these laws were in a particular multimedia screen design and, by extrapolation, what benefit other designers may gain from using these design principles. Therefore the value and specific desirable approaches for the design of new multimedia technology based on an expanded Gestalt theory base is the key point of this paper."

(Dempsey Chang, Laurence Dooley and Juhani E. Tuovinen)

Chang, D., Dooley, L. and Tuovinen, J.E. (2002). Gestalt Theory in Visual Screen Design – A New Look at an Old Subject. In Proc. WCCE2001 Australian Topics: Selected Papers from the Seventh World Conference on Computers in Education, Copenhagen, Denmark. CRPIT, 8. McDougall, A., Murnane, J. and Chambers, D., Eds., ACS. 5–12.

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1924aestheticsAustraliacommunication • CRPIT • Dempsey Chang • design • design balance • design formalismgestalt • gestalt laws • gestalt principlesgraphic designJenny Preece • Juhani E. Tuovinen • Laurence Dooley • psychologyvisual communicationvisual designvisual languagevisual perceptionvisual screen designvisualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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