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Which clippings match 'Project Development' keyword pg.1 of 2
12 OCTOBER 2014

The Ulm School: designing the system rather than the object

"The Ulm School of Design was founded in 1953 by Inge Aicher–Scholl, Otl Aicher and Max Bill, with the main task of incorporate design into industry and to shape our material culture. In the post–war years, the process was marked by a crisis of values and resources, and this fact drove the Ulm School to re–think the meaning of creating forms in the contemporary world and to democratize the access to design. The exhibition explores the concept of 'system', related with a set of rationally components capable of generating an object, and also the systematic approach of the school, which included for the first time, the integration of science and art.

The importance of the Ulm School in the history of design comes from the strict methodology they imposed on project development. Focusing on an inter–disciplinary work and objective design analysis, it rejected design as an artistic activity and spread through industry to all walks of life. The school was recognized worldwide for its approach of focusing on the design of the system rather than the object."

(Ethel Baraona Pohl, 13 February 2012, Domus Magazine)

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1953 • 1972 Munich Olympics • access to design • Bilbao metro • Braun KM2 Multiwerk • communication analysis • communication problems • communication systems • construction systems • contemporary world • Design Hub Barcelona • design methodologydesign of the system rather than the objectDieter Rams • domestic products • Domus (magazine) • elementary objects • flexible products • furniture systems • Hans Gugelot • Hans Roericht • Herbert Lindinger • Inge Aicher-Scholl • integration of science and art • interchangeable elements • interdisciplinary working • Konrad Wachsmann • Lufthansa • material cultureMax Billmechanisation • methodological analysis • new approach • Nick Roericht • Norman Foster • objective design analysis • Otl Aicherpost-war eraprefabricationproject developmentsemiotics • simple systems • systematic approach • systems in electronics • tablewareUlm School of DesignWilhelm Wagenfeld

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 MARCH 2013

Prototyping in Public Services

"Prototyping in Public Services describes an approach that can be used to help develop new and innovative services by testing ideas out early in the development cycle.

NESTA has produced a guide for policymakers, strategy leads, heads of service, commissioners and anyone else in a public service looking for new methodologies that can help them to better meet the needs of their communities. It sits alongside the Prototyping Framework: A guide to prototyping new ideas which provides examples of activities that can happen at different stages of a prototyping project.

The guide and toolkit are early outputs from our prototyping work and are based on work NESTA and its partners have been doing with several local authorities and third sector organisations. We will continue to learn about prototyping as an approach that can be used to develop public services, through our practical programmes."

(NESTA, UK)

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commissioners • concept developmentconceptualisation • development cycle • guide • heads of service • local authorities • NESTA • new and innovative services • new ideas • new methodologies • policy makers • practical programmes • project developmentproject workprototyping • Prototyping in Public Services • prototyping project • public services • strategy leads • testing • testing ideas • third sector • third sector organisations • toolkitUK

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JULY 2012

Design Guides for Business: commissioning designers

"We have created this free guide to explain the process of finding and working with a designer – focusing on your needs and ensuring you get the most out of the project."

(UK Design Council)

Fig.1 "Briefing a Design Team" [http://www.bigstockphoto.com]

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advice • briefing • British Design Innovation • businessbusiness adviceChartered Society of Designers • choosing a designer • commissioning creatives • describe the audience • Design Business Association • design commissioningDesign Council (UK)design guides for businessdesign needsdesign project • find designer • finding a designer • free guide • getting the project started • help and advicehelp and guidance • helpful tips • how to agree budgets • how to agree costs • how to find a designer • keeping on track • managing design • most for your money • professional designersprofessional practiceproject definitionproject developmentproject management • quality briefing • requirements gathering • successful projects • UK designers • useful advice • working designers • working with a designerwriting a design brief

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2011

Single-pass sequential 'waterfall' approach to software development

"I am going to describe my personal views about managing large software developments. I have had various assignments during the past nine years, mostly concerned with the development of software packages for spacecraft mission planning, commanding and post–flight analysis. In these assignments I have experienced different degrees of success with respect to arriving at an operational state, on–time, and within costs. I have become prejudiced by my experiences and I am going to relate some of these prejudices in this presentation. ...

A more grandiose approach to software development is illustrated in Figure 2. The analysis and coding steps are still in the picture, but they are preceded by two levels of requirements analysis, are separated by a program design step, and followed by a testing step. These additions are treated separately from analysis and coding because they are distinctly different in the way they are executed. They must be planned and staffed differently for best utilization of program resources."

(Winston Royce, 1970)

Figure 2 The "waterfall method" (one of numerous development models discussed by Royce in his seminal paper).

Winston Royce (1970). "Managing the Development of Large Software Systems", Proceedings of IEEE WESCON 26 (August): 1–9.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 NOVEMBER 2009

Rolling Wave Project Planning

"Rolling Wave Project Planning (RWPP) is a phased iterative approach to project development, applicable to new product development, information systems and other technical development environments. It is an excellent formal project development approach for inventive work. When done well, it balances structured process with flexibility. It is appropriate for project life cycle models/methods that allow incremental development (spiral, evolutionary prototyping, etc.)."

(Gregory D. Githens, Catalyst Management Consulting)

Rolling Wave Project Planning" (PMI Symposia Proceedings '98NPD Track)

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Catalyst Management Consulting • development life cycle • evolutionary prototyping • flexibilityincremental developmentinventioninventive workiterative designiterative design processlifecycle model • Process Model • project development • project life cycle • project managementproject management method • Rolling Wave Project Planning • RWPP • spiral mode

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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