Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Mechanism' keyword pg.1 of 2
20 JULY 2014

Mechnical sound works from commonplace industrial objects

"The sound sculptures and installations of Zimoun are graceful, mechanized works of playful poetry, their structural simplicity opens like an industrial bloom to reveal a complex and intricate series of relationships, an ongoing interplay between the 'artificial' and the 'organic'. It's an artistic research of simple and elegant systems to generate and study complex behaviors in sound and motion. Zimoun creates sound pieces from basic components, often using multiples of the same prepared mechanical elements to examine the creation and degeneration of patterns."

(Statements about Zimoun: Tim Beck http://www.zimoun.net/about.html)

1
2

TAGS

acoustic hum • artistic research • Bern • cacophony • chaotic forces • commonplace industrial objects • commonplace objects • complex behaviours • elegant systems • functional materials • generative systems • hum • industrial objects • installation artintricacykinetic sculpturekinetic sound sculpture • lifeless matter • mechanical rhythmmechanism • mechnical sound works • minimalist art • minimalist constructions • multiples • noise • ordered system • orderly patternspatternprimitive oscillatorsquasi autonomous creaturesrepetitionrhythm oscillator • rhythmic pattern • robotic artroboticsrule systemsimple rules • sonic chaos • sound and motion • sound artsound artistsound installationsound pieces • sound production • sound sculpture • sound works • structural simplicity • swarm behaviourswarming • synthetic structures • visual chaos • Zimoun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JUNE 2013

The Senster: pioneering cybernetic sculpture

"The Senster, commissioned by the electronics giant, Philips, for their permanent showplace, the Evoluon, in Eindhoven, was a much bigger and more ambitious piece of work than SAM. In addition to responding to people's voices, the Senster also responded to their movements, which it detected by means of radar, and was (as far as I know) the first robotic sculpture to be controlled by a computer. It was unveiled in 1970 and remained on permanent show until 1974 when it was dismantled.

Its size – it was over 15 feet (4 m) long and could reach as high into the air – made the use of aluminium castings inappropriate, so it was welded out of steel tubing, with the castings employed only in the more intricate microphone positioning mechanism. Its behaviour, controlled by a computer, was much more subtle than SAM's but still fairly simple. The microphones would locate the direction of any predominant sound and home in on it, rather like SAM but much more efficiently, and the rest of the structure would follow them in stages if the sound persisted. Sudden movements or loud noises would make it shy away. The complicated acoustics of the hall and the completely unpredictable behaviour of the public made the Senster's movements seem a lot more sophisticated than they actually were. It soon became obvious that it was that behaviour and not anything in its appearance which was responsble for the impact which the Senster undoubtedly had on the audience."

(Aleksandar Zivanovic)

1
2
3

TAGS

1970acousticsart + technologyartificial intelligenceartificial life • audio activated • audio controlledautomata • computer controlled • computer historycomputer sculpturecybernetic art • cybernetic sculpture • Cybernetic Serendipitycybernetics • direction detection • Edward Ihnatowicz • Eindhoven • futuristic machineshanging mobileinteractive artinteractive toykinetic artkinetic sculpturemechanical beingmechanismmovementPhilipsradarrobotroboticrobotic sculpturerobotics • SAM (Sound Activated Mobile) • sculptureshow (spectacle)simulation • sound activated • sound sculpturespeculative design • The Senster • wonderment

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 JANUARY 2013

Machines replace humans: heavy metal robot 3-piece

"I'm impressed with Compressorhead – the three–piece robot band (three and a half if you count the little robot who drives one of the cymbals). I went to their website to see if I could discern the origins of the project, DIY, corporate, academic, or whatever and couldn't really find anything on the makers. Then I tracked down the drummer. Stickboy was created by Robocross Machines and a whimsical roboticist named Frank Barnes. ... Reminds me of the Survival Research Labs robot machines, built for public performance and disturbance."

(Maxwell Schnurer, 5 January 2013, Life of refinement)

1
2
3

TAGS

3-piece band • AC/DC • Ace of Spades • androidautomateautomationband • Compressorhead • computer controlled musical instrumentcybernetic artcymbals • disturbance • drummereffigyengineering • Frank Barnes • futuristic machinesGermanheavy metalhi-hathumanoid automatonindustrialisationkinetic automatonmachineman machinemechanism • metal band • MIDI • mohawke • Motorhead • musical instrumentplay • public performance • Robocross Machines • robot • robot band • robot machinesroboticrobotic artroboticistsimulationspeculative design • Stickboy • Survival Research Labs • TNT • whimsicalwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 OCTOBER 2011

Zło muzykalna stacja dysków / Evil floppy drives

"Dźwięk powstaje poprzez ruch głowicy, która jest przesuwana krokowo z odpowiednią częstotliwością. Opis interfejsu można znaleźć np. TUTAJ. Wystarczy jedynie aktywować stację przez podanie stan niskiego na DRVSB0 lub 1 (w zależności czy mamy taśmę z crossem i do której wtyczki podłączona jest stacja) i wybrać kierunek ruchu głowicy (stan niski/wysoki na DIR), a zbocze opadające na STEP spowoduję ruch głowicy o jeden krok. Całością steruje mikrokontroler ATMega."

(SileNT)

[Creating music using a microcontroller to control twin stepper motors in floppy drives –in this case to play the Star Wars Emperor's Theme.]

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2011

Anne Lilly's kinetic sculpture motion design elegance

"I have questions that do not occur in words: questions about space, about material moving in space, and about the intermingling of space and object. I feel that space disguises itself and its nature by its transparency. It is, strangely, this very transparency that makes space opaque to our awareness. This new work uses skinny lines moving in space. Emptying out the volume reduces the visual mass so that more of the space around the work gets implicated in what the work finally is. The space shares in creating, or manifesting, the function of the work itself. This emptying–out of the mass makes it possible to imbue space without occupying space."

(Anne Lilly)

Fig.1 Parietals 2005;

1

TAGS

2005abstractionaestheticsanimation • Anne Lilly • azurebumble • choreographydesigndesign formalismdynamicelegancegeometry • graceful • kinetickinetic sculpturematerial moving in spacematerialsmechanismminimalmotionmotion designmovementobjectpatternrhythmsculpturesequencespacespace and objects

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.