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Which clippings match 'Bodies In Space' keyword pg.1 of 1
13 NOVEMBER 2014

Time and effort studies comparing the efficiency of pre-prepared meals with that of meals prepared from scratch

"Pre–cooked foods, made possible by new packaging development, are a major time–saver for housewives. Notice the difference in time and effort required in the preparation of a pre–cooked, pre–packaged goulash dinner and one fixed entirely from scratch. lights attached to the cook's wrists show how many more movements she had to make in the 90 minutes it took the long way, compared with the pre–cooked way which took only 12 minute."

(Elizabeth Diller, 1999, p.386)

Elizabeth Diller (1999). Bad Press. "Gender Space Architecture: An Interdisciplinary Introduction". editors: Iain Borden, Barbara Penner and Jane Rendell, Routledge.

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TAGS

bodies in spacecirculationcooking in the kitchenDiller + ScofidiodinnerefficiencyElizabeth Dillereveryday movement • fast food preparation • Georges Teyssot • goulash • home cooked meal • housewifehuman factors in designhuman motionkitchen • labour-saving • lightsLillian Gilbreth • meal preparation • motion-trackingmovement analysismovement efficiencymovement in spacepatterns of movement • pre-cooked • pre-prepared meals • prepackaged food • prepackaged mealpreparing a mealready mealready-made mealRicardo Scofidio • spatial information • spatial mappingstudying motionThe Kitchen Practical (1929)time savingtime-motion studiestracingtrajectoryunderstanding movementwasted motion • wrist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 OCTOBER 2011

Laban Movement Analysis: qualitative aspects of nonverbal behaviour

"Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) originated in the work of Rudolf Laban, and has evolved into a highly detailed practical system that describes qualitative aspects of nonverbal behavior. In its current development, it operates as a phenomenology of movement and mind, as it requires that the observer look at the movement itself, prior to interpretation and without prejudice, while acknowledging the intrinsic connection between movement and subjective experience. Movement Analysis increases kinesthetic sensitivity for the observer, because it places in the foreground of the observer's experience, those aspects of movement which are individual–specific: that is, those movement choices which an individual makes within a particular context. Movement Analysis as a system of observation assumes that a significant degree of individual freedom in movement quality is always present within biological, cultural, and contextually defined bodily repertoires."

(Janet Kaylo)

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TAGS

attunementbodies in spacebodily engagement • bodily repertoires • body experiencechoreographycorporealdance performance • dance therapy • everyday movementexpressive repertoirefigures in spaceforensic detail • freedom of movement • intimacyintimateintimate movement • kinaesthetic sensitivity • kinesthetic • kinesthetic participation • kinetic exchange • Laban Movement Analysis • language for describing movement • LMA • movementmovement analysis • movement analysis methodology • movement and subjective experience • movement efficiency • movement experience • movement life • movement lives • movement performance • movement quality • movement vocabulary • nonverbal behaviourobservationpatterns of movement • phenomenology of mind • phenomenology of movement • physical presenceposturepuppetryreal-life • Rudolf Laban • seeing • seeing another • sensitivity to others • sensory abilitysubtlety • system of observation • theatre performance • therapeutic • understanding movementwatching

CONTRIBUTOR

Elisza Ribeiro
05 NOVEMBER 2009

Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects

"Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects, using wire and recycled materials to create this army of circus characters. Beginning in 1927, Calder performed the Circus in Paris, New York, and elsewhere. He would issue invitations to his guests, who would sit on makeshift bleachers munching peanuts, just like the real circus. With the crash of cymbals and music from an old gramophone, the circus would begin. Many of the individual circus animals and performers include mechanized parts – Calder was originally trained as a mechanical engineer.

It wasn't the tricks or gimmicks of the circus that appealed to Calder, but the dynamic movement of bodies in space. He first went to the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey circus in 1925. He was inspired by the mechanics of the circus and made hundreds of drawings of the equipment and the ropes and the guy wires for the tents. Later in his career, Calder turned his attention to more abstract work. ... He went on to invent the mobile and other works of moving sculpture."

(Adam Weinberg, Whitney Museum of American Art)

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TAGS

19271955ad-hocAlexander Calderanimationart • Barnum & Bailey • bodies in spacecharacterchoreographycircusdrawing • dynamic movement • improvisationinanimate objects • mobile sculpture • motionmovement • moving sculpture • performancepioneerpuppetry • Ringling Brothers • theatreWhitney MuseumWhitney Museum of American Art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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