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Which clippings match '1955' keyword pg.1 of 1
19 FEBRUARY 2017

Jean-Luc Godard's first film: Une Femme Coquette (1955)

"The film, based on a Guy De Maupassant short story, was Godard's first shot at a narrative. It's often listed as lost by biographers, and the find is tremendously significant for French New Wave enthusiasts. There are also several easter eggs in the work for Godard fans: the director cameos two minutes in, the story is later re-adapted in Godard's 1966 film 'Masculin Féminin,' and the work itself is credited to his film-critic pseudonym, Hans Lucas.

Just five years after shooting 'Une Femme Coquette,' Godard would release his early masterpiece, 'Breathless.' There is so much of the energy of that latter work in this earlier vision, shot on a borrowed 16mm camera."

(William Earl, 18 February 2017, Indiewire)

TAGS

1955 • A Flirtatious Woman (1955) • based on novel • black and white • Carmen Mirando • coquette • early work • flirtatious • French filmmaker • French New Wave • French-Swiss film director • Genevagesture • Guy de Maupassant • Hans Lucas • Ile Rousseau • imitation of an actioninfluential filmmakerJean-Luc Godard • Le Signe (Guy de Maupassant) • Maria Lysandre • non-sync sound • prostitute • Roland Tolmatchoff • short fiction film • short film • Swiss filmmaker • Switzerland • The Signal (Guy de Maupassant) • Une Femme Coquette (1955) • voice-over commentarywoman

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 JANUARY 2012

The Revival of Psychogeography

"Psychogeography is hot. Guy Debord, founding member of Situationist International and the man who coined the term in 1955, defined the phenomenon as 'the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals'. In fact, psychogeography is the art of strolling, or just about anything that gets pedestrians off their predictable paths and leads them to a new awareness of the urban landscape. Recently we've seen a remarkable psychogeographic revival driven by several artistic urban projects and smartphone applications."

(Jeroen Beekmans, 4 January 2012, The Pop–Up City)

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TAGS

1955 • Adam Greenfield • Android appsappsart • art of strolling • artistic urban project • augmented reality • augmented sound • awarenesscitydaily routinederivedrift • Emilie Giles • encountersenvironmentescapeexploration • exploring the city • flaneur • forgotten places • geographical environment • Guy Debord • Inception app • Ingrid Burrington • interactive encounters • iPhoneiPhone app • iPhone apps • iPod Touch • Loneliness Map • lonely individuals • Lost London • mapmapping • missed connections • new technologiesperception of realityperformativityphenomena • Pratt Manhattan Gallery • predictable cities • psychogeographic experiences • psychogeographic explorations • psychogeographypublic spacerealityroute • Serendipitor • serendipitySituationist International • smartphone applications • smartphone apps • strollersurprisetechnology • unpredictable paths • urban landscapeurban mappingurban planningyou are here

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 NOVEMBER 2009

Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects

"Alexander Calder magically breathed life into inanimate objects, using wire and recycled materials to create this army of circus characters. Beginning in 1927, Calder performed the Circus in Paris, New York, and elsewhere. He would issue invitations to his guests, who would sit on makeshift bleachers munching peanuts, just like the real circus. With the crash of cymbals and music from an old gramophone, the circus would begin. Many of the individual circus animals and performers include mechanized parts – Calder was originally trained as a mechanical engineer.

It wasn't the tricks or gimmicks of the circus that appealed to Calder, but the dynamic movement of bodies in space. He first went to the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey circus in 1925. He was inspired by the mechanics of the circus and made hundreds of drawings of the equipment and the ropes and the guy wires for the tents. Later in his career, Calder turned his attention to more abstract work. ... He went on to invent the mobile and other works of moving sculpture."

(Adam Weinberg, Whitney Museum of American Art)

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TAGS

19271955ad-hocAlexander Calderanimationart • Barnum & Bailey • bodies in spacecharacterchoreographycircusdrawing • dynamic movement • improvisationinanimate objects • mobile sculpture • motionmovement • moving sculpture • performancepioneerpuppetry • Ringling Brothers • theatreWhitney MuseumWhitney Museum of American Art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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