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Which clippings match '8-bit' keyword pg.1 of 2
16 MARCH 2014

Space Invaders (1978): the groundbreaking arcade game

"Space Invaders is quite simply the most influential video–game of all time. A single player moves an armed 'base' left or right along the bottom of the screen and shoots the endless waves of aliens marching relentlessly down the screen towards earth. There are four buildings (shields) at the bottom of the screen that the player can hide behind, but these will eventually be destroyed by either enemy missiles or by direct contact with the invaders themselves. The player's shots will also destroy the shields. The aliens' descent quickens as they are eliminated, making them harder to hit. A flying saucer will fly across the top of the screen at regular intervals and can be shot to earn extra points."

(Alexis Bousiges and Kukulcan, Arcade–History)

Fig.2 Youths play on a Space Invaders machine in Newcastle (UK) in December 1980.

Fig.3 Space World, Auckland (Aotearoa New Zealand), 1982.

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TAGS

19788-bitalien beingsarcade gamearcade machine • Arcade Video Game • Arcade-History • black and whiteclassic video gamescoin operatedcomputer historygroundbreakinghistory and culturehistory of video gamesinfluential works • misspent youth • shootoutSpace Invadersspacies • Taito Corporation • Tomohiro Nishikado • UFOvideo gamevideo game consolevintage technology

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 OCTOBER 2013

Arduino can sense the environment by receiving input from a variety of sensors and can affect its surroundings by controlling lights, motors, and other actuators

"Arduino is a tool for making computers that can sense and control more of the physical world than your desktop computer. It's an open–source physical computing platform based on a simple microcontroller board, and a development environment for writing software for the board.

Arduino can be used to develop interactive objects, taking inputs from a variety of switches or sensors, and controlling a variety of lights, motors, and other physical outputs. Arduino projects can be stand–alone, or they can be communicate with software running on your computer (e.g. Flash, Processing, MaxMSP.) The boards can be assembled by hand or purchased preassembled; the open–source IDE can be downloaded for free.

The Arduino programming language is an implementation of Wiring, a similar physical computing platform, which is based on the Processing multimedia programming environment."

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32-bit • 8-bitAdobe Flash • Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) • Arduino • Arduino programming language • Atmel ARM • Atmel AVR • computing platform • controller • David Cuartielles • David Mellis • development environmentDIYelectronics • Gianluca Martino • IDEinput deviceinteractive objects • Massimo Banzi • Max (software)Max/MSPmicrocontrollermicrocontroller boardminimalist electronica • multimedia programming environment • open source platformopen-source hardwarephysical and digital interactionphysical computing • physical computing platform • physical worldpocket-sized circuit boardProcessing (software)programming languageprototyping platformsensor • Tom Igoe • Wiring (software library) • writing software

CONTRIBUTOR

Rob Canning
21 JUNE 2013

1980s chiptune easter egg rediscovered in NZ washing machines

"Twenty years of patriotism on the part of Fisher & Paykel has been revealed thanks to a viral social media video that shows its washing machines can play the national anthem. A video posted on YouTube by a woman on Tuesday has received more than 165,000 hits. The woman explains how to make the washing machine play the New Zealand national anthem.

Fisher & Paykel marketing manager Sonya Aitken said the machines, which can also play the United States and Australian anthems, were programmed to play tunes by the company's engineers for demonstration purposes. ... While the singing machines were used to draw customers' attention in stores 20 years ago, it was no longer part of sales techniques, so the feature had essentially been forgotten and then rediscovered, she said."

(Laura Walters, 21/06/2013, Fairfax NZ News)

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1980s8-bit • Advance Australia Fair • anthem • Aotearoa New ZealandAustralia • Beverly Hills Cop (1984) • chiptunecultural significance of objectsdigital archaeologydigital artefactsdomestic material objecteaster egg • Fisher and Paykel • God Defend New Zealand • hidden feature • Home of the Brave • how to do thingsmusic making technology • national anthem • obsolescenceordinary manufactured objectoutgrownpatriotism • power surge • rediscoveredremainderremains of the past • sales technique • social media • Sonya Aitken • tune • United Statesuseless machinesviral video • washing machine • what is left of the pastwhimsical interactions

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 DECEMBER 2012

Sinclair ZX81: semigraphical / pseudographical characters

"If you press GRAPHICS (shifted 9) then the cursor will come up as : this means graphics mode. If you type in a symbol it will appear in its inverse video form, & this will go on until you press GRAPHICS again or NEWLINE. RUBOUT will have its usual meaning. Be careful not to lose the cursor  amongst all the inverse video characters you've just typed in. ...

Right at the beginning are space & ten patterns of black, white & grey blobs; further on there are eleven more. These are called the graphics symbols & are used for drawing pictures. You can enter these from the keyboard, using graphics mode (except for space, which is an ordinary symbol using the  cursor; the black square is inverse space). You use the 20 keys that have graphics symbols written on them. For instance, suppose you want the symbol , which is on the T key. Press GRAPHICS to get the  cursor, & then press shifted T. From the previous description of the graphics mode, you would expect to get an inverse video symbol; but shifted T is normally <>, a token, & tokens have no inverses: so you get the graphics symbol  instead."

(Steven Vickers, 1981, Sinclair Research Limited)

Fig.1 "graphics mode" table from Steven Vickers (1981). "Sinclair ZX81 BASIC Programming", Second Edition 1981, Copyright 1980 Sinclair Research Limited (converted to HTML by Robin Stuart).

2). Matthew Eagles (2008). "ZX81 VDU" TrueType font which replicates the letters, numbers etc. displayed on the screen of the ZX81.

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1980s19818-bitbasic geometric shapesblack and white • block graphics • computer historygeometric figuresgeometric shapes • graphic symbols • graphical building block • graphics mode • history of computinghome computerindustrial archaeologymanualmonotone • PETSCII • pictorial systemspixel matrix • pseudographics • semigraphical characters • semigraphics • Sinclair Research Ltd • Sinclair ZX80 • Sinclair ZX81 • sixels • symbolsymbolstypefacevintage technologyvisualisationZX81

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 AUGUST 2012

PIXELS: invasion of New York by 8-bit video game pixels

New York invasion by 8–bits creatures ! PIXELS is Patrick Jean' latest short film, shot on location in New York. Written, directed by : Patrick Jean Director of Photograhy : Matias Boucard SFX by Patrick Jean and guests Produced by One More Production www.onemoreprod.com

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8-bit • 8-bits creatures • animationAtari • Brooklyn Bridge • cloudCommodorecreaturecultural literacy • cultural reference • digital culture • Donkey Kong • formal conceit • Frogger • invasionKing Kong • Matias Boucard • New York • NYC Subway • One More Production (agency) • Pac-Manparodypastiche • Patrick Jean • pixelpixelartpixelationpixellation • PIXELS (film) • Pongself-referentialSFXshort filmSpace InvadersTetrisvideo gamevideogamesvisual conventionsvisual vernacular

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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