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12 APRIL 2013

Guerrilla Gardening: Seed Bombs & Seed Balls

"I've been following guerrilla gardening on Twitter for quite some time, and have become familiar with the term 'seed bombing' as a result. It's an idea that's always appealed to me – it's a kind of eco–friendly, bee–friendly, slightly radical anti–vandalism activism – but it's just one of those things that I'd never pursued. ...

So how do they work? It's a simple process really – the seeds I bought are encased in a ball of peat–free compost, dried clay and chilli, which are hand–rolled in North London (yes, really, and no, it's not what you're thinking). The dried clay acts as a protective casing from common seed predators (such as ants, mice and birds). When enough rain permeates the clay, the seeds inside begin to germinate – helped along by the nutrients and minerals contained within the balls. So it's like a tiny self–sufficient seeding system. Maya [http://www.mayaproject.org/] have added chili powder to the mix to help to deter predators while the seed ball slowly degrades, and eventually the seeds sprout."

(Lucy Small, 5 April 2013)

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TAGS

activismagriculture • anti-vandalism activism • ball • bee-friendly • chili • compost • DIY gardening • earthcare • eco-friendly • fairshare • gardening • germination • guerrilla gardeningguerrilla tacticsNative Americans • peat-free compost • peoplecare • permacultureplants • project MAYA • seed • seed balls • seed bomb • seed bombing • seed bombs • seeding system • self-sufficientsustainable society

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 NOVEMBER 2011

You can have a garden: Edible Island Planters

"Eliza Donald couldn't find a large enough planter that suited her purposes, so decided to make her own. 'It took two years, working with plant specialists, and industrial designers, also asking a lot of people questions. It's important that a design functions well but it's equally important to ask why a person would want to use it in the first place,' she says. Eliza is now director of Edible Islands – handy aesthetically lovely planters the size of a small bathtub. You can plant out your veggies and a small tree, or once all your herbs die (if you have my touch) you can pop a lid on and just sit under your tree. Ingenious.

As Eliza points out, the potential benefits are plentiful, 'Sometimes people don't have an easy access to fresh veg. The planters help with Transition Towns – educating people on how to grow their own food and prevention of depression as people swap seeds, plants and recipes, and grow plants with their grandchildren. They increase flight pathways across cities for birds, bees and butterflies as more Edible Island Planters are put on roof tops, back yards, and schools.' The planters are all made in Pakenham, Australia."

(Lou Pardi, (small)LUST, 02 August 2011)

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TAGS

Australia • backyard • bathtubbetter-functioning productsbusiness women • domestic furniture • ecodesign • Edible Island Planters • Edible Islands • Eliza Donald • entrepreneurshipenvironmentally conscious design • fresh food • gardeninggreen design • grow your own food • herbs • industrial designkiwi ingenuity • Little Veggie Patch Company • Pakenham • planter • plantsproduct designproduct designerprotoductionresearch and developmentrooftopseedself-sufficientsustainable agriculture • sustainable cities • sustainable landscape and garden design • swappingtransition towns • veggies • women designers

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
01 NOVEMBER 2009

Transition Towns in Aotearoa New Zealand

"Transition Towns initiatives are part of a vibrant, international grassroots movement that brings people together to explore how we–as communities – can respond to the environmental, economic and social challenges arising from climate change, resource depletion and an economy based on growth. We don't look for anyone to blame or anyone to save us, but believe our communities have within themselves the innovation and ingenuity to create positive solutions to the converging crises of our time. We believe in igniting and supporting local responses at any level and from anyone–and aim to weave them together into a coordinated action plan for change towards a lower energy lifestyle. By building local resilience, we will be able to collectively respond to whatever the future may bring in a calm, positive and creative way. And by remembering how to live within our local means, we can rediscover the spirit of community and a feeling of power, belonging and sharing in a world that is vibrant, just and truly sustainable."

(Transition Towns in New Zealand)

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TAGS

Aotearoa New Zealandchangeclimate changecollaborationcommoditycommunityconsumptiondesign intelligencedesign responsibilityecoecologicaleconomic challengesenergyengagementenvironmental challengesethics • grassroots community project • grassroots initiative • grassroots movement • greenlocallocal businesses • local community • local currency • oil crash • organic gardening • Otaki • peak oilpermaculture • power of community • protestresilienceself-sufficientsocial challengessustainability • Transition Movement • transition towns

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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