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Which clippings match 'Data' keyword pg.1 of 20
04 DECEMBER 2014

Michael Seemann: Knowing Is Asking the Right Questions

"Proposition: In the Old Game, it was important who was storing which information and to what purpose. But what counts in the New Game, by that measure, is how information is retrieved. This shift of focus does not only change our attitude towards knowledge, but also touches on the power structures inherent in any kind of knowledge."

(Michael Seemann, 2014, p.25)

Michael Seemann (2014). 'Digital Tailspin: Ten Rules for the Internet After Snowden'

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2014 • ableism • algorithmic transparency • algorithmically filtered content • Angelina Atanasova • antifragility • bad ass mother fucker • big datacommon good • control over the digital world • Costanza Hermanin • culture of the query • data • data commons • database programmes • digital tailspin • distributed realities • Edward SnowdenEli PariserEvan Rotheveryday racism • Facebook timeline • fhashtag revolutions • filter bubbles • filter sovereignty • flash mobsflexibility • Hadoop • individual standpoints • information retrieval • Jane Bambauer • knowledge is power • Kontrollverlust • loss of control • MapReduce • Michael Seemann • Open Data City • open source softwareopenness • our attitude towards knowledge • political power of data analysis • power structures • query algorithm • radical new ethics • Roland Fryer • search • search field • self-affirmative echo chamber • self-determination • selfish participants • spontaneous network phenomena • Steven Levitt • tailspin • top-down hierarchies • tragedy of the commonstransparency

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 MARCH 2014

The Digital Methods Initiative

Call for Participation – Digital Methods Summer School 2014, On Geolocation: Remote Event Analysis (Mapping Conflicts, Disasters, Elections and other Events with Online and Social Media Data), 23 June – 4 July 2014

"The Digital Methods Initiative is a contribution to doing research into the 'natively digital'. Consider, for example, the hyperlink, the thread and the tag. Each may 'remediate' older media forms (reference, telephone chain, book index), and genealogical histories remain useful (Bolter/Grusin, 1999; Elsaesser, 2005; Kittler, 1995). At the same time new media environments – and the software–makers – have implemented these concepts, algorithmically, in ways that may resist familiar thinking as well as methods (Manovich, 2005; Fuller, 2007). In other words, the effort is not simply to import well–known methods – be they from humanities, social science or computing. Rather, the focus is on how methods may change, however slightly or wholesale, owing to the technical specificities of new media.

The initiative is twofold. First, we wish to interrogate what scholars have called 'virtual methods,' ascertaining the extent to which the new methods can stake claim to taking into account the differences that new media make (Hine, 2005). Second, we desire to create a platform to display the tools and methods to perform research that, also, can take advantage of 'web epistemology'. The web may have distinctive ways of recommending information (Rogers, 2004; Sunstein, 2006). Which digital methods innovate with and also critically display the recommender culture that is at the heart of new media information environments?

Amsterdam–based new media scholars have been developing methods, techniques and tools since 1999, starting with the Net Locator and, later, the Issue Crawler, which focuses on hyperlink analysis (Govcom.org, 1999, 2001). Since then a set of allied tools and independent modules have been made to extend the research into the blogosphere, online newssphere, discussion lists and forums, folksonomies as well as search engine behavior. These tools include scripts to scrape web, blog, news, image and social bookmarking search engines, as well as simple analytical machines that output data sets as well as graphical visualizations.

The analyses may lead to device critiques – exercises in deconstructing the political and epistemological consequences of algorithms. They may lead to critical inquiries into debates about the value and reputation of information."

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academic researchalgorithm • Almila Akdag Salah • Amsterdam • analytical machines • Anat Ben-David • Anne Helmond • Bernhard Rieder • blogosphereCarl Rogers • Carolin Gerlitz • Cass Sunsteinchart • chart data • Christine Hine • critical enquirydatadata analysisdata scraping • data sets • data visualisation • device critiques • digital methods • Digital Methods Initiative • Digital Methods Summer School • discussion forum • discussion lists • epistemological consequences • Erik Borra • Esther Weltevrede • folksonomiesFriedrich Kittler • Govcom.org • graphical visualisationshyperlink • hyperlink analysis • index • information environments • information validity • Issue Crawler • Jay David Bolter • Koen Martens • Lev Manovich • Liliana Bounegru • Lonneke van der Velden • Marc Tuters • Marieke van Dijk • Matthew Fuller • Michael Stevenson • Nadia Dresscher-Lambertus • Natalia Sanchez Querubin • natively digital • Net Locator • new medianew methods • older media forms • online newssphere • politicalrecommender culturereferenceremediationRichard Grusin • Richard Rogers • Sabine Niederer • scrapesearch engine • Simeona Petkova • social bookmarking • software-makers • summer schooltag • technical specificities • telephone network • Thomas Elsaesser • thread • virtual methods • web epistemology

CONTRIBUTOR

Linda Carroli
23 FEBRUARY 2014

Beautiful Science: Picturing Data, Inspiring Insight

20 February – 26 May 2014, Folio Society Gallery; admission free, London.

"Turning numbers into pictures that tell important stories and reveal the meaning held within is an essential part of what it means to be a scientist. This is as true in today's era of genome sequencing and climate models as it was in the 19th century.

Beautiful Science explores how our understanding of ourselves and our planet has evolved alongside our ability to represent, graph and map the mass data of the time.

From John Snow's plotting of the 1854 London cholera infections on a map to colourful depictions of the tree of life, discover how picturing scientific data provides new insight into our lives."

(The British Library)

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17th century • 1854 • 185819th centurybattlefield • Beautiful Science (exhibition) • big dataBritish Librarycartographychart • cholera • climate models • climate science • colourful depictions • Crimean War • datadata journalismdata visualisation • David McCandless • David Spiegelhalter • diseaseevolutionexhibition • Florence Nightingale • genome • genome sequencing • graph • Great Chain of Being (1617) • hierarchical visualisationhospitalillustrated diagramsinfographicinteractive visualisationinterpret meaningsinterpreting data • Johanna Kieniewicz • John Snow • London • Luke Howard • maps • Martin Krzywinski • mass data • Nigel ShadboltOpen Data Institute • picturing data • picturing scientific data • public health • Robert Fludd • rose diagram • Sally Daviesscience • science collections • science exhibition • seeing is believing • statisticstechnological changetree of lifeturning numbers into meaningvisual interpretationvisual representationvisual representation graphicallyvisual representations of scientific conceptsvisualising dataweather • William Farr • Winton Capita

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 FEBRUARY 2014

Raspberry Pi Box Lunch with Miller Puckette

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1990sAndroid OS • BSD license • collaborative production • create music together • data • developer base • FreeBSD OS • FUDI (networking protocol) • GNU • Graphics Environment for Multimedia (GEM) • GridFlow • Institut de Recherche et Coordination Acoustique Musique (IRCAM) • interactive computer music • interactivityiOS • IRIX OS • LAN • Linux • live collaboration • Mac OS X • matrix processing • Max (software)Max/MSP • Miller Puckette • multimedia works • music making technology • open source project • OpenGL • PiDiP • Pure Data (Pd) • Pure Data Packet • Raspberry Pireal-timereal-time interactivity • San Diego Supercomputer Center • software programmeterminal connectionvirtual collaborationvisual musicvisual programming languageWindows OS

CONTRIBUTOR

Mik Parsons
01 JANUARY 2014

Tinder: swiping yes to intimate invitations from relative strangers

"Tinder uses your existing social networking data from Facebook to locate people in the immediate vicinity, tell you a bit about them, whether you have any friends in common and (most importantly) show you a pic.

It has slimmed down the emotional, cognitive and financial investment required by the virtual dating process to one simple question: 'Do I want to do you?' What more modern way to make that most basic binary decision of whether you want to shag someone than a game of real–world 'Hot or Not'?

Social media has made us expert first–daters, well–versed in smalltalk and over–sharing with strangers. The quick follow–though from swipe to sex is similarly instinctive for a generation with an appetite for immediacy."

(Caroline Kent, 19 Sep 2013)

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automatic predictions • binary decision • casual sexcommodifying myselfcomparison site • compass • cross-context sharingdatadata matchingdatingFacebook • friends in common • hot or not • identity performance • immediate vicinity • iPhonelikedlikeslocation-basedlocation-based social networkingmobile appnormalising over-sharingonline datingonline profilesoversharingpersonal brandingproximityrecommendation platformself-disclosure • shag • shared friends • small talksocial mediasocial networkingspectacular societyswipingTinder (app)user data • vicinity • virtual dating

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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