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Which clippings match 'Op Art' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 NOVEMBER 2015

Light projection works by American artist James Turrell

"For over half a century, the American artist James Turrell has worked directly with light and space to create artworks that engage viewers with the limits and wonder of human perception. ...

Turrell often cites the Parable of Plato's Cave to introduce the notion that we are living in a reality of our own creation, subject to our human sensory limitations as well as contextual and cultural norms. This is evident in Turrell's over eighty Skyspaces, chambers with an aperture in the ceiling open to the sky. The simple act of witnessing the sky from within a Turrell Skyspace, notably at dawn and dusk, reveals how we internally create the colors we see and thus, our perceived reality. ...

Turrell's medium is pure light. He says, 'My work has no object, no image and no focus. With no object, no image and no focus, what are you looking at? You are looking at you looking. What is important to me is to create an experience of wordless thought.'"

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aesthetic experienceallegory of the cavechamber • childhood fascination • colour and lightcolour fieldcolour light • colour projection • design formalismflat colourformalist design aestheticsgeometric primitive • high-intensity projector • human sensory limitations • immaterialityimmersive experienceimmersive works • interior and exterior spaces • James Turrelllarge scale worklightlight and spacelight artlight projectionlight works • no focus • no image • no object • non-representationalNorth American artistop art • open sky spaces • perceptual psychology • physical presence of lightpresence • projection pieces • projection works • pure light • sensory form • sky • skyspaces • visual abstraction • wordless thought

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
10 OCTOBER 2014

Design agency Seismik uses moiré pattern to clever effect

"The packaged printed grill gives people the power of transformation through movement. ... The outer packaging with its printed grid means as soon as people pull the insert out it will cause the effect without instruction needed. As well as the primary kinetic piece on each side there is a secondary more subtle one in the background."

(Nottingham design agency: Seismik)

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2014animation • Backlit galleries • folding gallery wall spaces • folding geometry • folding moving spaces • Frank Kent • gallery programme • geometrical patterns • grid pattern • grill • illusionistic images • interactive elementskinetic animation • kinetic piece • mailshotmoire patternNottinghamop art • op art approach • optical effectoptical toyperceptual organisationprint media • printed grill • printwork • promo mailshot • Samuel Morely • Seismik (agency) • Simon Dunn • superimpositionvisual effectsvisual illusionvisual patternvisual recognition • visual superimposition • whole forms

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 FEBRUARY 2014

Pierre Hébert: Around Perception (1968)

"Around Perception is a groundbreaking experiment on computer–based animation, consisting of 11 audiovisual events designed to baffle cognition and unrest comfortable notions of reality. Unlike most of his later films, Hébert chose not to collaborate with top–notch experimental musicians and created the soundtrack himself. In this, he followed a method also used by Norman McLaren: to scratch sound directly onto the film itself. The relation between sound and picture, however, is not as symbiotic as in McLaren's Synchromy: although there are organic reactions between the two domains, one is not a direct translation of the other. This, of course, need not be seen as a weakness. Indeed, with its fast–paced changes of color and geometrical patterns, and the employment of Columbia–like richly crafted electronic tones, Around Perception works as a tremendously hallucinatory exercise in trompe l'oeil (and l'oreille) techniques. Or, as stated by Hébert himself at the beginning of the film, an exercise 'for the mind and against the mind'."

(The Sound of Eye)

Fig.1 "Around Perception", Director: Pierre Hébert, Year: 1968, Time: 16 mins, Music: Pierre Hébert.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2013

Czech Film Posters of the 1960s

"The birth of the Czech creative film poster phenomenon in the early sixties can be credited to Karel Vaca, Karel Teissig, Richard Fremund, Vladimir Tesar, Jiri Balcar, Jaroslav Fiser, Zdenek Ziegler, Milan Grygar, Bedrich Dlouhy, Zdenek Palcr and others. In the late sixties and during the seventies they were joined by Josef Vyletal, Olga Polackova–Vyletalova, Jiri Rathousky, Alexej Jaros, Karel Machalek, Petr Pos, Jiri Salamoun, Vratislav Hlavaty, Zdenek Vlach and Antonin Sladek. In the streets, but soon also at film festival exhibitions, in art galleries and cinema premises, Czech film poster rapidly won the favor of the public for its creative imagination, poetic and lyrical atmosphere. It was characteristic by the use of collage, rollage, photomontage, retouching, striking graphic designs, wity typographic visual puns and surrealist dreamy interpretation. Mass reproductions of works of art flooded the billboards in towns and cities and changed them into sidewalk open air galleries. In the course of the 1960s, Czech film poster designers found inspiration in the informal style, applying its forms of structural abstraction and lettrism, later on in pop–art and op–art, using the then popular psychedelic forms and colors. Artists frequently employed styles inspired by the film forms, such as enlarged close–up, merging of symbolic and metaphoric visual levels and repeated details."

(Marta Sylvestrova, Museu de Arte de Macau)

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1960s • Alexej Jaros • Andrzej Wajda • Antonin Sladek • artistic expression • Bedrich Dlouhy • collagecolour • cultural education • Czech film poster • Czech graphic design • Czech RepublicCzechoslovakiaexhibitionFederico Fellinifilm poster • film poster designer • graphic design • informal style • Ingmar Bergman • Jaroslav Fiser • Jiri Balcar • Jiri Rathousky • Jiri Salamoun • Josef Vyletal • Karel Machalek • Karel Teissig • Karel Vaca • lettrism • Luchino Visconti • Macau Museum of Art • mass reproduction • metaphoricmid-century design • Milan Grygar • Moravian Gallery in Brno • Museu de Arte de Macau • Olga Polackova-Vyletalova • op art • open air galleries • Paolo Pasolini • Petr Pos • photomontagepop art • psychedelic forms • psychedelic imagery • reproduction of illustrations • retouching • Richard Fremund • rollage • structural abstraction • surrealist inspiration • typographic poster • Vladimir Tesar • Vratislav Hlavaty • Zdenek Palcr • Zdenek Vlach • Zdenek Ziegler

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 JANUARY 2013

Anemic Cinema (1926) by Marcel Duchamp

"This characteristically dada film by Marcel Duchamp consists of a series of visual and verbal puns with nonsense phrases inscribed around rotating spiral patterns, creating an almost hypnotic effect. Silent.

Anemic Cinema (various versions were made in 1920, 1923 and, finally, in 1926). Essentially a film by Duchamp with help from Man Ray. Calvin Tomkins: 'Duchamp used the initial payment on his inheritance to make a film and to go into the art business. The film, shot in Man Ray's studio with the help of cinematographer Marc Allégret, was a seven–minute animation of nine punning phrases by Rrose Sélavy. These had been pasted, letter by letter, in a spiral pattern on round black discs that were then glued to phonograph records; the slowly revolving texts alternate with shots of Duchamp's Discs Bearing Spirals, ten abstract designs whose turning makes them appear to move backward and forward in an erotic rhythm. The little film, which Duchamp called Anemic Cinema, had its premiere that August at a private screening room in Paris.'"

(UbuWeb)

Marcel Duchamp (1926). "Anémic Cinéma", 7 minutes, B&W.

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1926 • Anemic Cinema • art historyavant-garde cinema • Calvin Tomkins • circle • concentric cirles • Dadadada filmdiscs • disk • erotic rhythm • gyrating • hypnotic effectMan Ray • Marc Allegret • Marcel Duchampmovement • nonsense phrase • op artoptical artoptical effectoptical illusionpatternperceptual phenomenonphonograph • phonograph turntable • pulsating alternation • revolving • rhythm • rotary demisphere • rotating spiral patterns • rotation • Rotoreliefs • Rrose Selavy • spinning • spiral • spiral pattern • spiraling • stereo-kinetic effect • surrealist cinematurntableUbuWebvelvet • verbal pun • visual experience

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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