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Which clippings match 'POV' keyword pg.1 of 2
09 JUNE 2013

Lady in the Lake: the dramatic effect of subjective point of view

"Robert Montgomery drehte 'Lady in the Lake' 1947 nach einem Plot, das Raymond Chandlers gleichnamigen Roman adaptierte. In diesem Spielfilm verfolgen Beobachter die Handlung aus der Perspektive des Detektivs Philip Marlowe: Personen, die sich Marlowe zuwenden und mit ihm sprechen, wenden sich der Kamera zu. Das wirkt in Filmvorführungen im Kino, als wenden sie sich in den Projektionsraum und sprechen die Zuschauer an. Der Beobachter wird zugleich ins Bildgeschehen durch die szenische Konstellation hineingezogen (Immersion), wie auf die Grenze zwischen Filmraum und Projektionsraum verwiesen, da er im Filmraum nicht selbst handeln kann, sich aber wie Marlowe im Bildraum verortet. Marlowe bleibt ein anderer, meist unsichtbarer Körper, der aber sieht und den Anschluss des Beobachters an seine Wahrnehmung einfordert: Die Kamera verleiht ihren Beobachtern einen szenischen Kontext, in den Kinozuschauer sich versetzen können. Sie stossen dabei sowohl auf Vorgaben (wie Marlowe spricht) wie auf Fehlstellen (das Sichtbare von Marlowes Auftreten, wenn er nicht in einen Spiegel schaut)."

(Thomas Dreher, IASLonline)

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TAGS

1947 • Audrey Totter • black and whitecamera anglecinematic conventionscinematic languagecinematic spacecrime fictiondetective storyfilm languagefilm noirfirst-person point of viewformal conceit • hardboiled • hardboiled detective • IASLonline • immersionLady in the Lake (1947)perspective view • Philip Marlowe • point of viewPOV • Raymond Chandler • Robert Montgomery • screen space • subjective shot • subjective viewpoint • visual conceit • visual depictionvisual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2012

Four to the Floor: the ever growing collection of Channel 4 idents

An "ever growing collection of Channel 4 current set of idents. The simple idea that flows through all these idents is the creation of 'the 4, be it optical illusion, supernatural intervention or coincidence, the iconic Channel 4 logo rears its head at some point during all these videos.

The basic premise leaves open many possibilities to play with, which perhaps also explains the longevity that these idents retain. New idents continue to be produced by Channel 4"

(John Beohm, idents.tv)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 JULY 2011

NTU Multimedia student Alex Card wins prestigious Yellow Pencil in D&AD Awards for Alvy character animation

"I got a second place and a yellow pencil! I'm so pleased it's unreal.

The award ceremony was great fun, so much free wine and Pimms! And obviously the chance to meet loads of professionals.

I had an amazing opportunity to speak to the Disney guys that set the brief I did. And it turns out that I'll actually be working with them on a few projects. I really hope to show them the best of what I can do and someday soon be working with them on my own show, or anything really, I'm still in shock."

(Alex Card, 29 June 2011)

[Nottingham Trent University Multimedia BA (Honours) student Alex Card commenting on winning 2nd place in the Animation / Crafts section of the 2011 D&AD Awards.]

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CONTRIBUTOR

Multimedia
11 MARCH 2011

Bullet Time: digitally-enhanced simulation of variable-speed photography

"GUN REPORT THUNDERS through the underground, both men BLASTING, moving at impossible speed.

For a blinking moment we enter BULLET–TIME.

Gun flash tongues curl from Neo's gun, bullets float forward like a plane moving across the sky, cartridges cartwheel into space. ..."

(Larry and Andy Wachowski, 3 June 1997, Science Fiction and Fantasy Movie Scripts)

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TAGS

1997 • Andy Wachowski • applied research • bullet • bullet timecamerachoreographycinemacinematographydevicediscovery • effect • experimentation • frame interpolation • history of cinema • John Gaeta • Keanu Reeves • Larry Wachowski • movementphotographypioneeringPOVshuttersimulationslow motion • slow-mo • solutionspecial effectsspectaclestop frametechniquetechnology • temps mort • The Matrix (1999)time slicingtimelapse • variable-speed • VFX • view morphing • virtual camera • virtual cinematography • visual depictionvisual effectsvisualisationwalkthrough

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 JULY 2010

SMS Sugar Man: the first feature film shot entirely on a cell phone

"Aryan Kaganof's SMS Sugar Man has either the dubious or celebratory distinction – depending on your point of view of these kinds of things – of being the first feature film shot entirely on a cell phone, specifically the Sony Ericsson W900i. Given the film's strong sexual content, Sony probably won't be championing the film any time soon. But, in their absence, I will.

To Kaganof's grand credit, the technique in which the film was shot never comes across as being gimmicky. The majority of the movie is shot as any traditional movie is shot despite the unique camera being used. Every once in awhile we do get a direct POV shot from one of the characters holding his or her own camera, but this is used very sparingly and is thus unobtrusive.

Scenes are mostly lit and executed as if filmed with a traditional camera. What's most surprising about the movie is that one might presuppose – or, at least I did – that it would be comprised of mostly quick cuts. I don't own a cell phone with a camera, but I had assumed one of them could only hold small files for short scenes. Against expectation, Kaganof comprises SMS Sugar Man with fairly longish shots and gives the film a very lyrical tempo."

(Mike Everleth, 17 November 2008)

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TAGS

2008 • Aryan Kaganof • authorshipcameracameraphonecell phonedigital camerafeature filmfilmfilm makinghybrid formsinnovationmediumminiaturisationmobile filmmakingmobile phonemoviePOVre-purposesex • SMS Sugar Man • Sony • Sony Ericsson W900i • techniquevisual communicationvisual designvisualisation • W900i

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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