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23 OCTOBER 2012

edX: free courses from leading universities

"EdX is a not–for–profit enterprise of its founding partners Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that features learning designed specifically for interactive study via the web. Based on a long history of collaboration and their shared educational missions, the founders are creating a new online–learning experience with online courses that reflect their disciplinary breadth. Along with offering online courses, the institutions will use edX to research how students learn and how technology can transform learning–both on–campus and worldwide. Anant Agarwal, former Director of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, serves as the first president of edX. EdX's goals combine the desire to reach out to students of all ages, means, and nations, and to deliver these teachings from a faculty who reflect the diversity of its audience. EdX is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts and is governed by MIT and Harvard."

(edX, 2012)

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TAGS

2012alone together • Anant Agarwal • Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory • course materialscoursewaredisruptive innovatione-pedagogyedX • extra-institutional contexts • free materialsfree use • global education • Harvard University • interactive study • knowledge-based economylearninglearning and doing • learning for interactive study • learning resourcelearning toolMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyMITnetworked learning environmentsnot-for-profitOCW • on-campus learning • online coursesonline delivery • online-learning experience • open learningoutreach technologytechnology transforming learning • tribe of one • VLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 AUGUST 2012

Teach and Learn Online: Die LMS die! You too PLE!

"The PLE project recognises the fundamental flaws in Virtual Learning Environments or Learning Management Systems (VLE, LMS), but falls short in its vision of an alternative. At this stage in the project it is suggesting that the PLE be a desktop application for a student (sounds a bit like my old Perfect LMS idea) or a singular portal online.

At risk of sounding like a broken record, I'll have to repeat my defining question about Internet enhanced learning, but this time in response to the PLE.

Question to the PLE: Why do we need a PLE when we already have the Internet? The Internet is my PLE, ePortfolio, VLE what ever. Thanks to blogger, bloglines, flickr, delicious, wikispaces, ourmedia, creative commons, and what ever comes next in this new Internet age, I have a strong online ID and very extensive and personalised learning environment. Actually I think the PLE idea is better envisioned by the futurist concept known as the Evolving Personalised Information Construct (EPIC). I think we already have EPIC, so why do we need the PLE?

To extend the statement: We insignificant little teachers and our out of date schools and classrooms don't need to be investing in media projects like VLEs, LMS and even PLEs. Our dam walls of knowledge have burst! and no amount of sand bagging will stop the flood that is clearly discrediting our authority over learning. Media, and with it communications, will evolve (as it certainly has in the last 50 years or more) well beyond the limitations of our classrooms, with investments and broadcast influence we can't even fathom. Why waste our precious money and time on projects that only serve to suspend our true position within that media scape. The PLE makes me think of ELGG, and it all makes me wonder why it is we educationalists still think we are even relevant anymore. The people (yes that includes us) are learning how to read and write for themselves, and in an amazing act of collective generosity, the people are teaching each other – why do they even need our classrooms... is it perhaps only credentialism that we offer? Or is it also sense of security and safety? Is it false?"

(Leigh Blackall, 13 November 2005)

Fig.1 "Lords of Graphite" by 5star (Neil Caldwell).

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TAGS

2005authorised voiceBlogger (software) • Bloglines • broadcast societycentralised platformclassrooms • collective generosity • Creative CommonscredentialismDeliciousdesktop application • desktop classroom • e-portfolio • educationalists • ELGG • EPIC (acronym) • ePortfolio • Evolving Personalised Information Construct • Flickrgift cultureinformation literacy • internet enhanced learning • learning and teaching • learning centre • Learning Management System • learning media • learning platform • learning portal • Leigh Blackall • LMSmedia literacymediascape • network literate • new Internet age • online portal • open Internet • Ourmedia • out of date • personalised learning environment • pervasive mediaPLEschools • singular portal online • virtual learning environmentsVLEWikispaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2012

From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors

"This paper presents a rational model developed to make sense of various elearning platforms currently in use in Australian universities. The conceptualisation and organisation of the elearning platforms is underpinned by an educational psychology framework of social construction of meaning, data visualisation and story telling for meaning making. The model explains how various elearning platforms can be integrated to represent a threedimensional, hierarchical construct that has the potential to aid understandings about the utility of information systems (IS) for learning and teaching. The model shows that LAMS, which has gained increasing popularity in Europe (Laurillard & Masterman, 2010), is usefully depicted as a 'middle ground' system, successfully bridging conventional LMSs and more advanced IS, referred here as (MU)VLEs (Multi–User Virtual Learning Environments). The model has important implications on how university lecturers, classroom teachers and students come to engage with an increasingly complex elearning environment."

(Eva Dobozy & Patricia Reynolds, LAMS Conference Sydney 2010)

Dobozy, E. & Reynolds, P. (2010). From LMS to VLE or from supermarkets to airports: Classifying elearning platforms using metaphors. Proceedings of the 5th International LAMS Conference 2010. http://lamsfoundation.org/lams2010sydney/papers.htm

TAGS

2010airport • airport metaphor • AustraliaAustralian universitiesclassification scheme • classifying • classroomcollaborationconceptual modelconceptualisationconference paper • constructivist approach • data visualisationDiana Laurillarde-learninge-learning application • e-learning conference • e-learning platformeducational psychologyelearning • elearning environments • elearning platforms • electronic portfolioengagement • Eva Dobozy • hierarchical orderinginformation systemsinformation visualisation • IS • LAMS • LAMS Conference • learninglearning and teachinglearning designlearning design support environmentlecturer • Liz Masterman • LMSmeaning makingmetaphor • Multi-User Virtual Learning Environments • MUVLE • Patricia Reynolds • pedagogysocial construction of meaningsocial constructivismsocial-constructivist approachstorytellingstudentssupermarketteachinguser requirementsvisual metaphorVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
08 JULY 2012

Emerging Trends in LMS / Ed Tech Market

"For the past decade, the LMS market has evolved from providing tools that were purchased at the departmental level to enterprise–class systems purchased at the institutional or even system–wide level. However, since about 2004 the market has been fairly consistent, dominated by Blackboard corporate strategy.

Blackboard went public in 2004, signaling a real market worth of investors' attention. In 2005–2006, the market was dominated by Blackboard's acquisition of WebCT, the number 2 player in LMS, resulting in a somewhat extended Department of Justice approval cycle. Starting in 2006, Blackboard was awarded the infamous '138 patent and subsequently filed suit against Desire2Learn, the new number 2 player in LMS. About this same time, open source started to become a viable alternative to proprietary systems in general, and Blackboard in particular, in the form of Moodle and Sakai. From 2006–2009, open source became fully established for campus–wide or system–wide LMS deployments. In late 2009, Desire2Learn successfully fended off Blackboard patent lawsuits, ultimately resulting in all 38 claims being ruled invalid by a US Court of Appeals. On the heels of these efforts in 2009, Blackboard purchased Angel, taking another competitor out of the market."

(Phil Hill, 4 August 2011, e–Literatee–Literate)

Fig.1 "LMS Market Share", [http://www.deltainitiative.com/higher–education/lms–strategy]

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TAGS

200420062009analytics • Angel (LMS) • blackboardBlackboard (LMS) • BrainHoney • BYU • campus-wide • Cengage MindTap • competitive market • competitor out of the market • contentcontent delivery • content delivery systems • content integration • corporate strategy • data reporting • Department of Justic • Desire2Learn • eCollege • ed tech market • enterprise-class systems • established • established LMS vendors • funding models • growing trend • HE • IMS • keep students engaged • key trends • learning from data • LMS • LMS deployment • LMS market • LMS provider • LoudCloud • market share • mine transactional data • Moodle • Moodle (LMS) • MoodleRooms • new LMS solutions • online programmes • open sourcepatent • patent lawsuits • patentsPearson • Pearson LearningStudio • Pearson MyLabs • proprietary systems • public institutions • regulatory changes • report transactional data • rSmart • SaaS • SaaS model • Sakai • Sakai (LMS) • SIS • software as a service • software as a service model • software deploymentsoftware functionality • software instructure • strategically important • Student Information System (SIS) • student information systems • system-wide • tools • Unicon (LMS) • university • US Court of Appeals • usabilityuser interface • viable alternative • VLEWeb 2.0Web 3.0WebCT

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 SEPTEMBER 2011

infoKit: effective use of VLEs

"The use of technology to support learning and teaching has changed dramatically in recent years.

Most institutions are now exploring the possibilities of e–learning and many have implemented VLEs or virtual learning environments. These tools offer great possibilities but they need to be used effectively if they are to deliver maximum benefit for students.

This infoKit takes you from the theoretical frameworks underpinning good teaching to the practice of e–learning. We consider how technology affects the roles of learner and teacher in a number of real–life scenarios. The infoKit is based on sound pedagogic approaches and draws on case studies of good practice across the UK.

Whether you are new to e–learning or an experienced practitioner there are pathways to guide you through the relevant sections of the infoKit. The infoKit will continue to grow and expand as the knowledge base develops and we welcome your participation in its further development."

(2011 Northumbria University, on behalf of JISC Advance)

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TAGS

best practicecase studiesCMC • Computer-Mediated Conferencing • e-assessmentelearninggood practice • infoKit • infoNetJISCknowledge baselearnerslearning activitieslearning and teachinglearning resource • Managed Learning Environment • MLE • Northumbria Universitypedagogic approachespedagogyresourceteacherteachingtheoretical frameworkstoolUKvirtual learning environmentsVLE

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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