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10 FEBRUARY 2012

Courtney Johnston: crowdsourcing weather and food history

"Taking the digital pulse of libraries, galleries and museums, looking at new and interesting ways to access and interact with collections from all over the world."

(Radio New Zealand, 30 November 2011 Radio New Zealand)

[Courtney Johnston takes time out of the National Digital Forum (http://ndf.natlib.govt.nz/about/2011Programme.htm) to talk to Radio New Zealand's Kathryn Ryan about crowdsourcing weather and food history. Read more on her blog at: http://best–of–3.blogspot.com/2011/12/day–after.html]



Old Weather, National Maritime Museum, London: a citizen–science project where volunteers are helping transcribe the logbooks of Royal Navy ships from around the time of World War One.
What's on the menu, New York Public Library: learning what people were eating a century ago in New York by transcribing NYPL's special collection of historical menus
Australian Dress Register: Collecting examples and information about clothing in New South Wales before 1945, from public and private collections.
Remix and Mash up competitions: Mix and Mash winners LibraryHack winners.

TAGS

2011accessAotearoa New Zealandarchives • Australian Dress Register • Boost New Media • Brenda Leeuwenberg • conference • Courtney Johnston • crowdsourcingdatabaseDickens Journals Onlinedigital collectionsdigital heritage • digital pulse • digitisationfandom • food history • galleries • historical menus • history • Kathryn Ryan • libraries • menus collection • museumMuseum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa • National Digital Forum • NDF • Nine to Noon • Old Weather • Radio New Zealand • transcribe • weather • weather history • Wellington

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 FEBRUARY 2012

Scientific publishing: the price of information

"On January 21st Timothy Gowers, a mathematician at Cambridge University, wrote a blog post outlining the reasons for his longstanding boycott of research journals published by Elsevier. This firm, which is based in the Netherlands, owns more than 2,000 journals, including such top–ranking titles as Cell and the Lancet. However Dr Gowers, who won the Fields medal, mathematics's equivalent of a Nobel prize, in 1998, is not happy with it, and he hoped his post might embolden others to do something similar.

It did. More than 2,700 researchers from around the world have so far signed an online pledge set up by Tyler Neylon, a fellow–mathematician who was inspired by Dr Gowers's post, promising not to submit their work to Elsevier's journals, or to referee or edit papers appearing in them. That number seems, to borrow a mathematical term, to be growing exponentially. If it really takes off, established academic publishers might find they have a revolution on their hands. ...

Dr Neylon's petition, though, is symptomatic of a wider conflict between academics and their publishers–a conflict that is being thrown into sharp relief by the rise of online publishing. Academics, who live in a culture which values the free and easy movement of information (and who edit and referee papers for nothing) have long been uncomfortable bedfellows with commercial publishing companies, which want to maximise profits by charging for access to that information, and who control many (although not all) of the most prestigious scientific journals."

(Feb 4th 2012, The Economist)

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TAGS

academicacademic journalacademicsboycott • bundling • Cambridge University • Cell (journal) • Elsevier (publisher) • free access • free and easy movement of information • funded researchgift culture • Lancet (journal) • libraries • Nick Fowler • online publishing • petition • prestigious • publicationpublisherpublishers • publishing companies • referee papers • Research Works Act • scientific journals • subscribe • taxpayer-funded research • The EconomistTimothy Gowers • Tyler Neylon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2009

Art and Culture Destination

"The aim of Culture.Info is to be the first port–of–call for users seeking cultural information on a particular topic. Each Culture.Info sub–portal will provide a carefully researched set of listings of links to information that is more focused and useful than can usually be obtained from the vast majority of existing listings or search engines.

Cultural areas will be added in due course in the following key areas:

* Heritage–including archaeology, archives, conservation, history, heritage, museums

* Media–including advertising, broadcasting, digital & new media, film, games, publishing, radio, television

* Performing–including circus, comedy, dance, festivals, music, opera, puppetry, theatre

* Pursuits–including antiques & collecting, hobbies & pastimes, outdoor activities

* Sport–individual and team, and also sports involving animals

* Visual–including architecture, crafts, design, exhibitions, galleries, painting, photography, sculpture

* Words–including books & literature, languages, libraries, reading, writing

* A place could be a country, a region or even a city."

(Culture.info)

TAGS

activities • advertisingantiquesarchaeologyarchitecturearchivesarts and culturebooksbroadcastingbrokeragecircuscitycollectingcomedyconservationcountrycrafts • culture.info • dancedesigndigital mediaEuclidexhibitionsfestivalsfilmfundinggalleriesgamesheritagehistory • hobbies • languageslibrariesliteraturemediamuseummusicnew mediaoperaoutdoorpaintingpastimesperformingphotographypublishingpuppetryradioreadingregionsculpturesporttelevisiontheatreUKwriting

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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