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Which clippings match 'Comedy' keyword pg.2 of 3
28 NOVEMBER 2011

Buster Keaton: one of the greatest comic actors of all time

"Buster Keaton is considered one of the greatest comic actors of all time. His influence on physical comedy is rivaled only by Charlie Chaplin. Like many of the great actors of the silent era, Keaton's work was cast into near obscurity for many years. Only toward the end of his life was there a renewed interest in his films. An acrobatically skillful and psychologically insightful actor, Keaton made dozens of short films and fourteen major silent features, attesting to one of the most talented and innovative artists of his time. ...

Often at odds with the physical world, his ability to naively adapt brought a melancholy sweetness to the films. The subtlety of the work, however, left Keaton behind the more popular Chaplin and Lloyd. By the 1930s, the studio felt it was in their best interest to take control of his films. No longer writing or directing, Keaton continued to work at a grueling pace. Not understanding the complexity of his genius, they wrote for him simple characters that only took advantage of the most basic of his skills. For Keaton, as for many of the silent movie stars, the final straw was the advent of the talkies."

(American Masters and The Public Broadcasting Corporation)

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TAGS

actor • actor-director • American MastersBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedy • comic actor • daredevildeadpan expressionfilmmakerfunnyhumour • Joseph Frank Keaton • moviespathosPBSperformancephysical comedysilent filmsilent moviesslapstickstoicsubtlety • The Cameraman (film) • The General (film) • The Navigator (film)

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 MAY 2011

That Mitchell and Webb: we want your ad-hoc reckon

"What do you think about this issue? Do you have any thoughts? What are those thoughts? Will you tell us them? Any thoughts at all will do. If you have em –we want to hear them. Are you personally affected by this issue then email us or if you're not affected by this issue can you imagine what it would be like if you were? ..."

(BBC Two, UK)

That Mitchell and Webb Site "We want your Ad–hoc 'reckon'" Series Two, Episode Five

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absurdityad-hoc • ad-hoc reckoning • agencybanalityBBC2British comedycomedy • David Mitchell • opinionparodyprejudicereckon • Robert Webb • sketch comedysocial media • That Mitchell and Webb Look • That Mitchell and Webb Sound • tv newsuninformed opinionunqualified opinionuser-generateduser-generated contentwhat I reckon

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 DECEMBER 2010

Charlie Chaplin: truth and naturalism through improvisation

"While Harold Lloyd played the daredevil, hanging from clocks, and Buster Keaton maneuvered through surreal and complex situations, [Charlie] Chaplin concerned himself with improvisation. For Chaplin, the best way to locate the humor or pathos of a situation was to create an environment and walk around it until something natural happened. The concern of early theater and film was to simply keep the audience's attention through overdramatic acting that exaggerated emotions, but Chaplin saw in film an opportunity to control the environment enough to allow subtlety to come through."

(Public Broadcasting Service, 28th August 2006)

TAGS

actorAmerican MastersaudienceauthorshipBuster KeatonCharlie Chaplincomedycontroldaredevil • exaggerated emotions • filmfilm acting • Harold Lloyd • hidden treasures • humourimprovisationnaturalismpathosPBSperformancephysical comedy • Public Broadcasting Service • realismsilent moviessocial realitysubtletytheatretruth • Unknown Chaplin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 OCTOBER 2010

$#*! My Dad Says: Twitter one-liners basis of CBS television series

"Pressure? Get married when you want. Your wedding's just one more day in my life I can't wear sweat pants.'"

(Sam Halpern via Justin Halpern, 10.12.2009)

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$#*! My Dad Says • $h*! My Dad Says • 20092010 • Bleep My Dad Says • CBScitationcomedy • comedy writer • digital culture • expletive • father • Forgetting Sarah Marshall • Justin Halpern • Kristen Bell • Laughing Squid • obscenityone-liner • Patrick Schumacker • profanityquoteremediation • Rob Corddry • salty comments • Sam Halpern • San Diego • Sh*t My Dad Says • Shit My Dad Says • sitcomtelevision • The Daily Show • tweeted • TwittervulgarityWilliam Shatner

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 FEBRUARY 2010

Iranian popular theatrical forms through the lens of Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of carnival

"[Mikhail] Bakhtin's concept of carnival as a subversive, disruptive world–upside–down event in which the repressive views, lies, and hypocrisy of the officially run and dominated everyday world are unmasked provides a powerful theoretical concept for any study of Iranian popular theatrical and related musical forms. Bakhtin was concerned with polyvocality and the fact that from the onset of the European Renaissance the voices of the common people were increasingly not heard. The Islamic Republic's ban on the performance of improvisational comic theater would seem to support this theoretical stance with empirical evidence of official reaction. In the European context analyzed by Bakhtin, a writer, exemplified by Rabelais, enacts an important role because he or she reflects the voices of the low, the peasant, the outcast. In Bakhtin's view, the healthy voice of the low, which questions the high–the church and the state–is an important check on oppressive officials in a healthy society.

A full–fledged carnival–such as those in Rio de Janeiro and New Orleans–does not exist in the Iranian culture sphere. By carnival I mean a massive demonstration of excessive eating, drinking, and sexual and bodily exposure, popularly associated with Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, that does not occur within an Islamic/Iranian context. Threads and themes of carnivalesque and grotesque subversion, however, can be found woven through the fabric of the Iranian world. Here the needle that pricks the official religious, social, and political powers most is the traditional comic theater in its many guises.

In many ways siyah–bazi and ru–howzi embody Bakhtin's notions of the grotesque and the carnivalesque. Gholam–siyah, the blackface clown, the 'low Other,' always wins over his master: the world upside down. Gholam–siyah's extravagant clothing, movements, speech, and lower–class language demonstrate Bakhtin's dictum, 'the grotesque...cannot be separated from folk humor and carnival spirit' (Stallybrass and White 1986, 43). Gholam's bright red costume and conical hat, for example, are probably the closest thing to carnival costume in the entire Middle East. William O. Beeman, a scholar of Iranian linguistics, discusses the blackface clown: 'The clown distorts normal physical movement by jumping, running, flailing his arms, and twisting his body into odd shapes' (1981, 515). This is, of course, part of his repertoire, for sight gags make up much of the comedy of traditional comic theater. This grotesque twisting of the body is also part of the dancing that occurs in the comic theater, especially by the male characters."

(Mass Mediations)

TAGS

Aranyer Din Ratri • Beverley Minster • burlesquecarnivalcarnivalesqueceremonychaosclowncollaborationcomedy • comic theatre • costumedemonstrationdialogicdisruption • Dostoevskys Poetics • emancipationetiquetteEuropean Renaissanceeventexcessextravagance • Feast of Fools • Feast of the Circumcision • Francois Rabelais • Fyodor Dostoyevsky • Gholam-siyah • grotesquehegemonyhumourimprovisationIran • Islamic Republic of Iran • juxtaposition • Lent • Lincoln Cathedral • Mardi Gras • medieval festival • Middle EastMikhail Bakhtin • New Orleans • outcastparticipationpeasant • Pieter Bruegel • polyphony • polyvocal • protestreligionRio de Janeiroriotritual • ru-howzi • sacred • siyah-bazi • social changesocial constructionismsocial hierarchiessocial interactionsocietyspectaclesubversiontheatretraditiontransformationtransgressionunmasked • Wise Children • world-upside-down

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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