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Which clippings match 'Graphic Novel' keyword pg.1 of 2
04 FEBRUARY 2016

Vento: pre-cinema technique used to animated book illustration

"'VENTO' : animated book by Virgilio Villoresi and illustrated by Virginia Mori for Withstand"

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2014black and whitebook illustrationchildrens bookchildrens book illustrationgraphic novelillustrated bookillustrated picture bookillustration • image and movement • implied movementinteractive booksmoire patternoptical effectperceptual organisationpersistence of visionpicture book • pre-cinema technique • Vento (2014) • Virgilio Villoresi • Virginia Mori • visual communicationvisual pattern • Withstand Books • women illustrators

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 DECEMBER 2014

Sex Criminals: high-concept comic book about time freezing deviance

"Suzie's a normal girl with an extraordinary ability: when she has sex, she stops time. One night she meets Jon... who has the same gift. And so they do what any other sex–having, time–stopping, couple would do: they rob banks."

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2013alternative cartoons • alternative culture • arresting time • bank robbing • Chip Zdarsky • comedy seriescomic bookcomicscriminal actsdeviance • deviant desires • formal conceit • freeze time • frozen in the momentfrozen in timefrozen momentgraphic novelhigh concept • Image Comics • in media resindividual gaininterzoneliminality • Matt Fraction • mature readers • moment of climaxopportunityorgasmpetite mort • robbing banks • rule of law • sex comedy • Sex Criminals (comic book) • slice of frozen timespeculative fictionthefttime

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JUNE 2013

Pulp International: retro popular culture and graphic novel illustration

"Yes, fifteen years ago it was. We were kids who didn't know squat about print publishing and now we're older and we don't know squat about web publishing. But we hope Pulp International manages to entertain. It's a bit different from our old Pulp, but it's similar in many ways too. We'll be looking for pulp everywhere – certainly in the usual places, like books and magazines, but also in music and art. For that matter, we'll also be looking for pulp events – that is, real–world crimes with a touch of deceit or corruption. And lastly, we'll be posting images from blaxploitation, sexploitation, noir, horror, sci–fi and psychedelia films, because these too seem like pulp. At least to us. So there you go. Nothing is permanent, and this site won't be either, but as long as it's fun, and you enjoy it, we'll be here."

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1950s1960s1970s1996advertising imagesadvertising posters • blaxploitation • book cover designcheesecakeconsumer culturedesign ephemeradetective storyfilm noirglamour shotgraphic novelmagazine artmagazine illustrationmaterial culturenewspaper adNSFW • Pierre-Laurent Brenot • pin-uppop-culture • popular illustration • poster art • psychedelia • psychedelic imagerypulp fiction • Pulp International (magazine) • retrosci-fisex sellssexploitationsexual innuendotitillationvintage advertisingvisual depictionvisual ephemera

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 JULY 2012

Fahrenheit 451: illustrations replace text in newspapers

Montag (Oskar Werner) 'reads' his illustrated newspaper in bed. The scene is from François Truffaut's classic film treatment of Ray Bradbury's 1953 novel about a dystopian world where written books have been outlawed.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies

"Wardrip–Fruin builds upon the foundation laid by Lev Manovich, who, in his 2002 book The Language of New Media, suggested that the natural development of media studies in an age of 'programmable media' should be 'software studies' (a set of approaches which includes 'expressive processing' but also code studies which, in Wardrip–Fruin's words, looks at 'the specific text of code' written by developers).

Expressive Processing fulfills and extends the promise of Manovich's ideas, putting the theory into practice through a set of case studies of the artificial intelligence engines of a dozen or so software programs that might be loosely called 'games.' That the first real example of a software studies approach comes out of game studies is both to be expected and (somewhat) regretted. On one hand, games of the sort Wardrip–Fruin examines are a medium for storytelling and character creation, and as such are natural extensions of the work of previous literary and media studies scholars and thereby set up a convenient space for humanities scholars and teachers to consider the important cultural and technical issues raised by Wardrip–Fruin in an environment more familiar than, for instance, an analysis of the software that drives Walmart (one of Wardrip–Fruin's suggestions for another work of software studies scholarship). Unfortunately, like graphic novels and musical theater, the genre is still too easily dismissed as popular entertainment by too many of those who most need to hear Wardrip–Fruin's arguments."

(Doug Reside, 2010)

Reside, D. (Fall 2010). "A review of Noah Wardrip–Fruin's Expressive Processing: Digital Fictions, Computer Games, and Software Studies." Digital Humanities Quarterly 4(2).

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academic journal • ADHO • codecode studiescultural analyticsdatadigital culturedigital humanities • Digital Humanities Quarterly (academic journal) • expressive processing • game studiesgraphic novelhumanitiesinformation aestheticsLev Manovichliterary studiesmedia studiesmusical theatre • Noah Wardrip-Fruin • popular culture • popular entertainment • programmable mediasoftwaresoftware literacysoftware studiesstorytellingtext of codeThe Language of New Mediavisualisation • Walmart

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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