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Which clippings match 'Breakbeat' keyword pg.1 of 1
11 NOVEMBER 2016

Rap & Hip-Hop was born in 1973 at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue

"Hip-hop music is generally considered to have been pioneered in New York's South Bronx in 1973 by Jamaican-born Kool DJ Herc. At a Halloween dance party thrown by his younger sister, Herc used an innovative turntable technique to stretch a song's drum break by playing the break portion of two identical records consecutively. The popularity of the extended break lent its name to 'breakdancing'--a style specific to hip-hop culture, which was facilitated by extended drumbreaks played by DJs at New York dance parties. By the mid-1970s, New York's hip-hop scene was dominated by seminal turntablists DJ Grandmaster Flash, Afrika Bambaataa, and Herc. The rappers of Sugarhill Gang produced hip-hop's first commercially successful hit, 'Rapper's Delight,' in 1979'.

Rap itself--the rhymes spoken over hip-hop music--began as a commentary on the ability--or 'skillz'--of a particular DJ while that DJ was playing records at a hip-hop event. MCs, the forerunners of today's rap artists, introduced DJs and their songs and often recognized the presence of friends in the audience at hip-hop performances. Their role was carved out by popular African-American radio disc jockeys in New York during the latel96Os, who introduced songs and artists with spontaneous rhymes. The innovation of MCs caught the attention of hip-hop fans. Their rhymes lapped over from the transition period between the end of one song and the introduction of the next to the songs themselves. Their commentaries moved solely from a DJ's skillz to their own personal experiences and stories. The role of MCs in performances rose steadily, and they began to be recognized as artists in their own right [2].

The local popularity of the rhythmic music served by DJs at dance parties and clubs, combined with an increase in 'b-boys'--breakdancers--and graffiti artists and the growing importance of MCs, created a distinctive culture known as hip-hop. For the most part, hip-hop culture was defined and embraced by young, urban, working-class African-Americans. Hip-hop music originated from a combination of traditionally African-American forms of music--including jazz, soul, gospel, and reggae. It was created by working-class African-Americans, who, like Herc, took advantage of available tools--vinyl records and turntables--to invent a new form of music that both expressed and shaped the culture of black New York City youth in the 1970s."

(Becky Blanchard, 1999)

2). Information on MCs drawn from the University of Maryland's "Mcing: The Past" and "MCing: The Present" in "A Brief History of Hip-Hop Culture"

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1970s1973African AmericanAfrika Bambaataaappropriation • b-boys • b-girls • Becky Blanchard • black culture • block party • break dancing • breakbeat • breakdance • breakdancing • Cindy Campbell • civil rights movement • Clive Campbell • cultural expression • dance party • DJ • DJ Grandmaster Flash • DJing • extended break • gospel • graffiti art • graffiti artists • Grandmaster Flash • hip-hophip-hop backbeat • hip-hop culture • hip-hop music • hip-hop performance • hip-hop scene • jazz • Kool DJ Herc • l960s • MC • MCing • music history • musical form • New York City • radio disc jockey • rap • rap artist • rap music • rapperreggae • rhyme • rhythmic music • Sedgwick Avenue • skillz • soul • South Bronx • spoken word • Sugarhill Gang • turntable • turntable technique • turntablist • vinyl record • West Bronx • working classworking class cultureyouth culture

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MAY 2012

Adam Yauch of The Beastie Boys Dies at 47

"It is with great sadness that we confirm that musician, rapper, activist and director Adam 'MCA' Yauch, founding member of Beastie Boys and also of the Milarepa Foundation that produced the Tibetan Freedom Concert benefits, and film production and distribution company Oscilloscope Laboratories, passed away in his native New York City this morning after a near–three–year battle with cancer. He was 47 years old."

(Beastie Boys)

Fig.1 Music video by The Beastie Boys performing "Gratitude". (C) 2009 Capitol Records, LLC [recorded in 1992 in Rotorua, Aotearoa New Zealand].

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197919922012 • 47 years old • activist • Adam Horovitz • Adam Yauch • Aotearoa New Zealandartistically innovativeband • bass • bass guitar player • bass guitaristbass player • bassist • Beastie BoysbreakbeatBuddhistcancerdeathelectric bass • gratitude • Gratitude (song) • hip-hophip-hop beatsinnovative • Leslie speaker • Live at Pompeii • lo-fi • lo-fi hip-hop beats • Maori carvings • MCA • Michael Diamond • Milarepa Foundation • Milarepa Fund • music videomusicianNew York City • Oscilloscope Laboratories • passed awayraprapperremix culture • salivary gland • sampled • thermal pools • trioturntable

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
19 JANUARY 2011

Madonna's Justify My Love: beautiful black and white shallow focus

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1990 • Bandits Productions • beautifulbisexualbisexualityblack and whitebreakbeatcinematographycontroversialdance • drum break • explicit sexual images • female sexualityglamourhaving sexhotel • hotel hallway • Ingrid Chavez • James Brown • Jean-Baptiste Mondino • Jeanne Moreau • Justify My Love • Lenny Kravitz • Madonna • music singlesmusic video • Pascal Lebegue • Philippe Dupuis-Mendel • Propaganda Films • Public Enemy • sadomasochismselective focussex • sexually seduced • shallow depth of fieldshallow focus • singer-songwriter • Sire Records • songTony Ward • trip-hop • voyeurismwhisper

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2009

Can I Get An Amen?

"Can I Get An Amen? is an audio installation that unfolds a critical perspective of perhaps the most sampled drum beat in the history of recorded music, the Amen Break. It begins with the pop track Amen Brother by 60's soul band The Winstons, and traces the transformation of their drum solo from its original context as part of a 'B' side vinyl single into its use as a key aural ingredient in contemporary cultural expression. The work attempts to bring into scrutiny the techno–utopian notion that 'information wants to be free'– it questions its effectiveness as a democratizing agent. This as well as other issues are foregrounded through a history of the Amen Break and its peculiar relationship to current copyright law."

(Nate Harrison)

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19692004 • Amen Break • art and creativity • audio • audio installation • authorship • b-side • backbeatbreakbeatcopyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonscritical perspectivecultural expression • cultural ownership • culturedemocratisationdigital culturedrum beat • drum sample • drum solo • drum-and-bass • hip-hophip-hop backbeathistoryinformation wants to be freeinnovation • jungle music • musicmusic clip • Nate Harrison • ownershippiracyremixremix culturesampledsampler • soul band • soundsubculturetechnology • The Winstons • turntablevinyl record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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