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Which clippings match 'Information Wants To Be Free' keyword pg.1 of 1
08 AUGUST 2012

PressPausePlay: does democratised culture mean better art, film, music and literature?

"The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent of people in an unprecedented way, unleashing unlimited creative opportunities.

But does democratized culture mean better art, film, music and literature or is true talent instead flooded and drowned in the vast digital ocean of mass culture? Is it cultural democracy or mediocrity?

This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world's most influential creators of the digital era."

(House of Radon)

Fig.1 "PressPausePlay" (2011) [http://www.houseofradon.com/]

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TAGS

2011 • Adam Watson • amateur cultural productionamateurism • Amy Phillips • Andre de Ridder • Andre Stringer • Andrew Keen • Anne Hilde Neset • Anthony Volodkin • Apparat • artistic process • Bill Drummond • Brenda Walker • Christopher Weingarten • consumer co-creationcreativitycultural democracy • David Girhammar • David Weinberger • democratised culturedigital eradigital revolutiondocumentary • Georgia Taglietti-Sonar • Hank Shocklee • Hillary Rosen • Hot Chip (group) • House of Radon (agency) • influential creatorsinformation wants to be freeJimi Hendrix • Jonas Woost • Katie Johnson • Keith Harris • Lena Dunham • Lykke Li • mass culturemasterymastery of toolsmediocrity • Mike Cosola • Moby • Nick Sansano • Norman Hollyn • Olafur Arnalds • originality • PressPausePlay • produserremix cultureRip Mix BurnRobyn • Robyn Carlsson • Scott Belsky • Sean Parker • Seth Godin • Shen Lihiu • Takafumi Tsuchiya • talent • Ted Schilowitz • Toby Smith • unlimited creative opportunities • Xiang Xaing • Yasuhiko Fukuzono • Zach Hancock

CONTRIBUTOR

Chris Thorby
18 OCTOBER 2011

Cyberpunk: the future has already happened

"Cyberpunk' is a 60–minute documentary, the ad for which states: 'What started as a book became a literary movement. What was a literary movement became a subculture'.

And that's one of the major flaws of this film. It perpetuates the general myth that everything 'cyberpunk' expanded out of 'Neuromancer' and Gibson's vision. In truth, most of the stuff covered here (virtual reality, hacking, industrial music, cybernetics, designer drugs, anarchy) was already developing quite nicely before Lord Gibson, Chairman Bruce, and the rest (Shirley, Rucker, Shiner) were kind enough to provide a fictional universe in which to fuse these disparate explorations.

The production of 'Cyberpunk' is very inconsistent, too –– some parts are professional documentary, while other parts have the odor of quick–cash opportunism. The breathy women narrator is ultimately aggravating, oh–ing and ah–ing over all this stuff.

But there is some good material here, including interviews with Gibson, Leary, Scott Fisher (of NASA/Ames), Brenda Laurel, Vernon Reed (Living Color), Bill Leeb (Front Line Assembly) and others. There's also some cool computer graphics (circa 1989) and an industrial soundtrack with Front Line Assembly, Ministry, and Severed Heads.

'Cyberpunk' is still a must–see since it's the only documentary about cyberpunk that we have."

(G. Branwyn)

Fig.1 Produced and Directed by Marianne Trench and Peter von Brandenberg, Intercon Productions, 1990.

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TAGS

1990 • anarchy • augmentation • Bill Leeb • bodybody modificationBrenda Laurel • Bruce Bethke • computer graphics • computer virus • corporeal augmentationcyberneticscyberpunk • Cyberpunk (1990) • cyborgdesigner drugsdystopiaembodimentethicsfictional universe • Front Line Assembly • hackinghacktivismhuman beings • industrial music • informationinformation wants to be free • John Shirley • Lewis Shiner • Living Color • Mariana TrenchMinistry (band)mutant scienceNASA Ames Research CenterNeuromancerorgan • phone phreaking • posthumanRudy Ruckersci-fiScott Fisher • Severed Heads (band) • speculative designtechnological determinismtechnophobiaTimothy Leary • Vernon Reed • virtual realityvirusvisions of the futureVRWilliam Gibson

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2009

Can I Get An Amen?

"Can I Get An Amen? is an audio installation that unfolds a critical perspective of perhaps the most sampled drum beat in the history of recorded music, the Amen Break. It begins with the pop track Amen Brother by 60's soul band The Winstons, and traces the transformation of their drum solo from its original context as part of a 'B' side vinyl single into its use as a key aural ingredient in contemporary cultural expression. The work attempts to bring into scrutiny the techno–utopian notion that 'information wants to be free'– it questions its effectiveness as a democratizing agent. This as well as other issues are foregrounded through a history of the Amen Break and its peculiar relationship to current copyright law."

(Nate Harrison)

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TAGS

19692004 • Amen Break • art and creativity • audio • audio installation • authorship • b-side • backbeatbreakbeatcopyrightcopyright lawCreative Commonscritical perspectivecultural expression • cultural ownership • culturedemocratisationdigital culturedrum beat • drum sample • drum solo • drum-and-bass • hip-hophip-hop backbeathistoryinformation wants to be freeinnovation • jungle music • musicmusic clip • Nate Harrison • ownershippiracyremixremix culturesampledsampler • soul band • soundsubculturetechnology • The Winstons • turntablevinyl record

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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