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Which clippings match 'Milan' keyword pg.1 of 1
27 NOVEMBER 2012

Technological advances expand the artist's expressive vocabulary

Exhibition: "Bruno Munari: My Futurist Past", Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 39A Canonbury Square, London, N1 2AN, From 19 September 2012 to 23 December 2012.

Bruno Munari was a "founding member of the Movimento Arte Concreta (M.A.C.) in Milan, which was established towards the end of the 1940s. This acted as a catalyst for new developments in Italian abstraction, and aspired to bring about a 'synthesis of arts' in which traditional painting would be complemented by new tools of communication, demonstrating the possibility of a convergence of art and technology, creativity and functionality. Reflecting his belief that technological advances expanded the artist's expressive vocabulary, by 1950 Munari had begun to experiment with creating works by means of projecting light through compositions made from a wide range of materials such as coloured and transparent plastic, organic elements and Polaroid filters, producing beautiful and intriguing images of vast dimensions."

(Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art, 2012)

Fig.1 Bruno Munari, Aeroplanes and Archers, 1932, mixed media, 34.8 x 24.8cms Courtesy Massimo & Sonia Cirulli Archive

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TAGS

19071998artart and technologyartistBruno Munaricolour and lightConstructivist-inspiredconvergence • creativity and functionality • exhibitionexpressive vocabularyFuturism (art movement) • Futurist past • hanging mobile • hanging objects • Italian • Italian abstraction • Italian art • Milanmobilesmodernist tradition • Movimento Arte Concreta • new tools of communication • photomontagesculpturespatial environments • synthesis of arts • technological advances • transparent plastic • uncritical attitude towards progress • use of space • useless machinesworking across disciplines • working across media

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 FEBRUARY 2010

Giuseppe Arcimboldo: Vertumnus

"Giuseppe Arcimboldo (also spelled Arcimboldi; 1527 – July 11, 1593) was an Italian painter best known for creating imaginative portrait heads made entirely of such objects as fruits, vegetables, flowers, fish, and books – that is, he painted representations of these objects on the canvas arranged in such a way that the whole collection of objects formed a recognisable likeness of the portrait subject.

Arcimboldo was born in Milan in 1527, the son of Biagio, a painter who did work for the office of the Fabbrica in the Duomo. Arcimboldo was commissioned to do stained glass window designs beginning in 1549, including the Stories of St. Catherine of Alexandria vitrage at the Duomo. In 1556 he worked with Giuseppe Meda on frescoes for the Cathedral of Monza. In 1558, he drew the cartoon for a large tapestry of the Dormition of the Virgin Mary, which still hangs in the Como Cathedral today."

(www.Giuseppe–Arcimboldo.org)

Fig.1 Giuseppe Arcimboldo (Italian, ca. 1527–1593). Vertumnus (Portrait of Rudolf II), 1590. Oil on panel. 70.5 x 57.5 cm (27 3/4 x 22 5/8 in.). Photo: Samuel Uhrdin.

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TAGS

1527 • Arcimboldi • artart historycreative practice • Emperor Rudolf II • fishflowersfruitGiuseppe Arcimboldographic representationhistoryimagination • Italian painter • Milanoptical illusionpainterpaintingspectacleSwedenvegetablesVertumnaliaVertumnusvisual depictionvisual designvisual pun

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2009

Vuccumprà: simple 2D animation with strong graphic style

The 2D animation sequence entitled Vuccumprà was created by Julien Attard and Cibic & Partners in 2004. The clip has a strong graphic style and simple camera movement.

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TAGS

20042D2D animationadanimationblack and white • Cibic & Partners • designdesign formalismdiagramgraphic representationItaly • Julien Attard • Milanmotion graphicsmusic videovisual designvisualisation • Vuccumprà

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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