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Which clippings match 'Figuration' keyword pg.1 of 3
14 JANUARY 2015

Allen Jones: the pop artist whose transgressions went too far

"Jones explains the situation, as he sees it. 'For artists of my generation, coming on stream in the Sixties, whatever you did you had to reckon with American gestural abstraction. The problem with figurative art at the time was that it had run out of steam, but the polemic was that you couldn't do it any more, which seemed absurd after 4,000 years of people making representations of each other. To me the Pop movement was incontrovertibly a swing of the pendulum back towards representation. The problem wasn't with representation, it was the age–old one – with the language. And the language had run out of steam. Using urban imagery as source material revitalised figurative painting, without a doubt. And recently the main thrust of the avant–garde from Basquiat and Schnabel up to Koons and company has been figuration with a vengeance.'"

(Andrew Lambirth 1 November 2014, The Spectator)

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TAGS

1960s1969 • accepted canons • Allen JonesBritish artist • Chair (1969) • controversydeliberately offensive • demonised figure • female figure • figuration • figurative art • figurative painting • figurative sculptor • figurative work • fine artflat colourflat surfacefurniture • Hat Stand (1969) • human bodyICA • in the wilderness • Jean-Michel Basquiat • Jeff Koons • Julian Schnabel • leather boots • made to offendmannequin • ostracised • outrage • piece of furniture • political correctitude • political correctness • politically correct • pop art • pop artist • provocative art • realistic representation • representational art • retrospective exhibitionscantily cladsculpturesexist • sexually provocative • Table (1969) • tabootransgression • unwritten taboo • urban imagery • wig

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
27 JANUARY 2014

BEAUTY: animating Western romantic paintings

CREDITS: Director RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Assistant Director LAILA SONSINO 2nd Assistant Director CARLOTTA BALESTRIERI Editing – Compositing – Animation RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Sound Design ENRICO ASCOLI Art Direction RINO STEFANO TAGLIAFIERRO Historiographer GIULIANO CORTI.

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2D space • Adrien Henri Tanoux • Albert Bierstadt • Andrea Vaccaro • animated painting • Arnold Bocklin • art history • Asher Brown Durand • Augustin Theodule Ribot • beauty • Carlotta Balestrieri • Caspar David Friedrich • classical subjects • Claude Lorrain • Correggio • Elizabeth Jane Gardner Bouguereau • enliven • Enrico Ascoli • Enrique Simonet • Felice Boselli • figuration • figure painting • Franz von Stuck • Fritz Zuber-Buhle • Gabriel Cornelius von Max • Gabriel von Max • Gioacchino Pagliei • Giuliano Corti • Guido Reni • Guillaume Seignac • Gustave Dore • Herbert Draper • homage • Hugues Merle • Ilya Repin • interpretation • Ivan Shishkin • Jacques-Luois David • Jakub Schikaneder • James Sant • Jan Lievens • Jan van Huysum • Johannes VermeerJohn Everett Millais • John William Godward • Joseph Rebell • Jules Joseph Lefebvre • Laila Sonsino • living paintingliving pictures • Louis Jean Francois Lagrenee • Luca Giordano • Luis Ricardo Falero • Marcus Stone • Martin Johnson Heade • Martinus Rorbye • Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio • motion painting • movementmoving paintingpainting • Paul Delaroche • Paul Hippolyte Delaroche • Paul Peel • Peter Paul Rubens • Pierre Auguste Cot • Pieter ClaeszreenactmentRembrandt van Rijnremediation • Rino Stefano Tagliafierro • Roberto Ferri • salon painter • Sophie Gengembre Anderson • tableau vivanttableaux changeanttableaux mouvantsTheodore Gericault • Thomas Cole • Thomas Eakins • Thomas Hill • Tiziano • Victor Karlovich Shtemberg • William-Adolphe Bouguereau

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

Ophelia re-visited through vacant expressions and alienating surroundings

"In 1851–1852 John Everett Millais painted a canvas that would become his most famous work: Ophelia. This compelling picture of the tragic heroine of Shakespeare's Hamlet, floating in the water, has inspired artists for generations. Striking parallels to Millais's oeuvre are to be found in the work of contemporary photographers, such as Rineke Dijkstra, Hellen van Meene, Inez van Lamsweerde & Vinoodh Matadin. The influence of Ophelia is noticeable in the models' vacant expressions, the hushed atmosphere of the compositions and the alienating surroundings. ...

Ophelia is also referred to in film and pop music. For instance, Nick Cave and Kylie Minogue based their music video where the wild roses grow on the painting by Millais. Another example is the cover picture of PJ Harvey's album To bring you my love."

(Van Gogh Museum)

Fig.1 Nick Cave and Kylie Minogue (1996). "Where the Wild Roses Grow".

Fig.2 PJ Harvey (1995). "Down By The Water".

Fig.3 John Everett Millais (1851–52). "Ophelia".

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TAGS

alienating surroundings • artatmosphericattention to detailcompositiondeathfigurationfloatingHamlet • Hellen van Meene • Henry Tate Gift • homage • hushed atmosphere • Inez van Lamsweerde • influentialinspirationJohn Everett MillaisKylie Minogueluminositymusic video • Nick Cave • Ophelia • painting • PJ Harvey • pop music • Pre-Raphaelite • remixrevision • Rineke Dijkstra • serious subjects • significant subjects • To Bring You My Love • tragic death • tragic heroine • vacant expression • Vinoodh Matadin • water • Where the Wild Roses Grow • William Shakespeare

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 NOVEMBER 2011

The Greeting is a film which pretends to be a painting

Bill "Viola's The Greeting is pretending to be a picture, hanging on the wall of the National Gallery, as part of 'The Passions' exhibition in 2003. The context of the gallery space and the badging of The Greeting as a picture give the work something different, making it more than just a film. The significance is in the context of where it is shown and the pretence occurring that this is a picture. Indeed, when walking downstairs in the National Gallery towards 'The Passions' exhibition, it is seeing it hanging on the wall that strikes immediately; I am being invited to believe that this animated film is pretending to be a picture. The analogy is of the picture becoming an actor, pretending to be something else. In terms of form, The Greeting is a film. Therefore, what is it that makes it now defined as an exhibition, a part of Viola's 'The Passions' in 2003? It is only the fact that it's part of a gallery that makes it an exhibition, although in reality it is also actors directed by a video artist into this film, slowed down and with no sound, which is pretending to be a painting. Therefore, it is conceptual art, in that what the artist is doing is not just making a painting, or having the idea for a painting, but having the idea of where it should be staged. The inscribed text of the space in which it is viewed makes a difference to what the viewer or spectator sees, and what is going on."

(Alison Oddey, 2007, p.70)

3). Alison Oddey (2007). "Re–Framing". In: "Re–Framing the Theatrical", Palgrave Macmillan. 1–21.

Fig.1 Bill Viola (1995). "The Greeting".
Fig.2 Jacopo Carucci da Pontormo "The Visitation".

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2003actorsallusionart historyartistartistic experience • Bill Viola • conceptual artcontextexhibitionfigurationfilmgallery • gallery space • hanging on the wall • homage • inscribed text of the space • interdisciplinaryliving picturesmetatheatricalityNational Gallerypainting • Passions (exhibition) • performancepicturepretence • pretending • pretending to be a painting • re-framing • reenactmentreflexive foregroundingremediationspacespectatorspectatorship • staged • stagingtableau vivant • The Greeting • The Passions • the role of the spectator • the viewer • theatre-art • theatricaltime slowed downvideo artvideo artistviewer

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
06 SEPTEMBER 2011

Riduan Tomkins' formal use of figuration

"Figuration itself is not inconsistent with the Modernist tradition since, even the most abstract of Modernist work makes references to things outside itself, yet, of all the features in Tomkins' work, the distinctive way in which he uses figuration seems to set it apart from the rest. Giacometti–like (although informed by Picasso and Matisse) troupes of figures edge around the paintings always playing some formal role but never solely in virtue of their form, scale, colour or location. Typically they point, both literally and figuratively, to formal elements in the Works, including, curiously enough, each other – but they also fly on trapezes, hold safety nets, dance and strike poses. None of the figures, however, are merely incidental to formal issues and although interdependent with them they have, as well, a life of their own. This invites interpretation, at least to the extent that we find ourselves reflecting on how and why the figures appear to us as they do – like mute vandevillians whose master, Tomkins, having rendered them onto some flattened proscenium, orchestrates their participation in a frozen theatrical tragicomic tableau. However, we cannot know the purpose of such entertainments beyond their capacity to intrigue and amuse us."

(Ted Bracey, 1987)

2) Ted Bracey (1987). Robert McDougall Art Gallery [now Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu].

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abstraction • Alberto Giacometti • Aotearoa New Zealandauthentic residueChristchurchcolour fielddancedesign formalismfigurationfiguresfigures in spaceflat spaceflat surface • flattened proscenium • formformal elements • formal issues • frozenHenri Matisselegitimacyminimalist artmodernismmodernist traditionPablo Picassopainting • pentimenti • pentimento • proscenium arch • reflexive aesthetic practices • Riduan Tomkins • scale • School of Fine Arts • strike a pose • tableautableau vivant • Ted Bracey • theatricaltragicomictrapezeUniversity of Canterbury • vaudeville • visual language

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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