Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Cyberspace' keyword pg.1 of 4
18 OCTOBER 2016

HyperNormalisation: our retreat into a simplified version of the world

"The documentary is inspired by the unpredictable events of recent times – from the rise of Donald Trump to Brexit, the war in Syria, the endless migrant crisis, and random bomb attacks. It seeks to explain both why these chaotic events are happening, and why we and our leaders can't understand them. Curtis's theory is that Westerners - politicians, journalists, experts and members of the public alike - have retreated into a simplified, and often completely fake version of the world. But because it is all-encompassing, we accept it as normal.

HyperNormalisation explores this hollow world by looking back at 40 years of events, and profiling a diverse cast of characters such as: the Assad dynasty, Donald Trump, Henry Kissinger, Patti Smith, the early performance artists in New York, President Putin, intelligent machines, Japanese gangsters and suicide bombers."

(Holly Barrett, 22nd September 2016, Royal Television Society)

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20169/11 • Acid Phreak (pseudonym) • Adam CurtisAfghanistan • AirBnB • Alexei Yurchak • Anthony GiddensArab Spring • Arkady Strugatsky • BBC documentary • BBC iPlayer • Boris Strugatsky • Brexit • British filmmaker • British National Front • Carl Rogers • cartoon villain • chaos • chaotic events • chatbot • civil rights movement • Corrupt (pseudonym) • cyber activism • cyberspace • Damascus • David Frost • Declaration of Independence in Cyberspace • delusion • digital rightsdisruptive innovationdocumentaryDonald Trump • Eli Ladopoulos • ELIZA (natural language processing) • fakeness • functioning society • Gulf War • HAC (pseudonym) • Hafez al-Assad • Henry Kissinger • hippies • hypernormalisation • HyperNormalisation (2016) • intelligent machines • internet utopianismIraq • John Barlow • John Lee • Joseph Weizenbaum • Judea Pearl • Julio Fernandez • late communist period • Lester Coleman • liability theory • Lionel Ritchie • machine fetishisation • Mark Abene • Martha Rosler • Masters of Deception (MOD) • migrant crisis • Muammar Gaddafi • Muslim Brotherhood • New YorkNigel FarageOccupy Wall Street • Outlaw (pseudonym) • paradoxPatti Smith • Paul Stira • performance artists • Phiber Optik (pseudonym) • powerlesspretence • random bomb attacks • retreat into simplified views of the world • Roadside Picnic (1972) • Ronald Reagan • Royal Television Society • Scorpion (pseudonym) • self-absorbed baby boomers • self-fulfilling prophecy • Soviet UnionStalker (1979)suicide bombersSyria • Tahir Square • techno-panic • techno-utopiaterrorism • time of great uncertainty • Timothy LearyTron • Uber • Vladimir PutinVladislav Surkov • War in Syria • Yakuza

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
05 OCTOBER 2014

Feb. 8, 1996: We (Mostly) Celebrate 24 Hours in Cyberspace

"24 Hours in Cyberspace was the inspiration of photographer Rick Smolan, who created the 'Day in the Life' photo-essay series. Smolan used the same formula as 'Day in the Life,' recruiting 150 photojournalists to go out and chronicle a slice of everyday life, in this case as it pertained to the then-counterculturish phenomenon of the web.

The technology of the internet was not the subject: Smolan wanted (and got) pictures of how different people in different cultures were using the internet, and the effect that the medium of cyberspace was having on their lives.

The resulting work was edited and then displayed on a website. It also appeared as the cover story of that week's edition of U.S. News and World Report and, soon thereafter, as a coffee-table book."

(Wired.com, 8 February 2008)

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1996 • 24 hours • 24 Hours in Cyberspace (1996) • 8 February 1996 • a single day • book • coffee-table book • cyberspacedaily lifeday in the life • digital time capsule • glimpse • influence of the web • innocence • lives touched by the web • photographer • photographers around the world • random collection • Rick Smolan • single day on the internet • time capsule • visually capture • webWired (magazine)world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 JANUARY 2014

The Online Disinhibition Effect: the psychology of online oversharing

"Sometimes people reveal suppressed emotions, fears, and wishes; they show unusual acts of kindness and generosity, or go out of their way to help others. We may call this 'benign disinhibition.' On the other hand, people may be rude, critical, angry, hateful, and threatening, or they visit places of perversion, crime, and violence – territory they would never explore in the 'real' world. We may call this 'toxic disinhibition.'"

(John Suler, p.184)

Suler, J. (2005). "The Online Disinhibition Effect." International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies 2(2).

Fig.1 Katie Shimel "Very Sad Right Now" [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3q–dqAvIgI]

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anonymity • asynchronicity • attenuated status • behaviour • benign disinhibition • catharsisconcealment • courage • cyberspacedetachmentdisclosure • disinhibition • disinhibition effect • dissociative anonymity • dissociative imagination • I share therefore I amidentity performance • intrapsychic world • introjected character • introjection • invisibility • John Suler • minimisation of authority • narcissismnormalising over-sharing • offline identity • online behaviour • online disinhibition • online disinhibition effect • online environment • outpouringsoversharingpersonal identitypersonal performancepsychepsychoanalysis • psychological presence • psychologyreal world • self-boundaries • self-disclosing • self-disclosure • solipsistic introjection • superego • suppressed emotions • text communication • toxic disinhibition • transference expectations • true self • typed-text conversation • unusual acts • wishes and needs

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 MAY 2013

With Enough Data, the Numbers Speak for Themselves...

"Not a chance. The promoters of big data would like us to believe that behind the lines of code and vast databases lie objective and universal insights into patterns of human behavior, be it consumer spending, criminal or terrorist acts, healthy habits, or employee productivity. But many big–data evangelists avoid taking a hard look at the weaknesses. Numbers can't speak for themselves, and data sets –– no matter their scale –– are still objects of human design. The tools of big–data science, such as the Apache Hadoop software framework, do not immunize us from skews, gaps, and faulty assumptions. Those factors are particularly significant when big data tries to reflect the social world we live in, yet we can often be fooled into thinking that the results are somehow more objective than human opinions. Biases and blind spots exist in big data as much as they do in individual perceptions and experiences. Yet there is a problematic belief that bigger data is always better data and that correlation is as good as causation."

(Kate Crawford, 12 May 2013, Foreign Policy)

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Apache Hadoop • biasbig data • big-data science • blind spot • causal relationshipscausationcodecomputer utopianism • consumer spending • criminal actscyberspacedata abstractiondata analysisdata collection and analysisdataset • Foreign Policy (magazine) • globalisationhealthy habitsimplicit informationimplicit meaningInternetinternet utopianism • looking at the numbers • network ecologynetworked society • objects of human design • patterns of human behaviourpatterns of meaningquantified measurementreliability and validityscientific ideas • security intelligence • social world • terrorist acts • Twitterunderlying order • universal insights • universal methoduniversal rationality

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
21 NOVEMBER 2012

V2_Institute for the Unstable Media

"In the turbulent year of 1981 the building at Vughterstraat 234 in Den Bosch was squatted by a group of artists and musicians, including a young Joke Brouwer and an almost as young Alex Adriaansens. There was no place for their sounds, art or ideas in the established venues, so they created one of their own at 'V234,' quickly shortened to 'V2.' September 3 and 4, 1981 the first events where organized. In 1982, these pragmatic anarchists decided to organize themselves into a foundation, and V2_ was officially born."

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1981 • 3D projection • Alex Adriaansens • art in electronic networks • art installationart productionartist collectiveartistic means • arts practice • audiovisual arts • centre for art and media technology • communications media • computers as an artistic medium • cyberspace • Den Bosch • digital imagery • digital techniques • do-it-yourself • Dutch Electronic Art Festival • Einsturzende Neubauten • electronic mediaelectronic musicexhibition space • Institute for the Unstable Media • interactive installationsinteractive video • interdisciplinary workspace • international media laboratory • ISDN • Joke Brouwer • knowledge exchange • Laibach • machine art • manifesto • mixed media applications • multimedia centre • multimedia organisationNetherlands • network and communications media • new technical possibilitiesnew technology • pragmatic anarchists • public events • public spaceroboticsRotterdamSonic Youthsound installation • squatting • The building gave room for concerts and performances analogue media • unstable media • V2_virtual realityvisual arts • Vughterstraat 234 • world wide web

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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