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Which clippings match 'Economic Change' keyword pg.1 of 3
31 JANUARY 2016

The 10 skills you need to thrive in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

"By 2020, the Fourth Industrial Revolution will have brought us advanced robotics and autonomous transport, artificial intelligence and machine learning, advanced materials, biotechnology and genomics.

These developments will transform the way we live, and the way we work. Some jobs will disappear, others will grow and jobs that don't even exist today will become commonplace. What is certain is that the future workforce will need to align its skillset to keep pace.

A new Forum report, The Future of Jobs, looks at the employment, skills and workforce strategy for the future."

(Alex Gray, 19 January 2016, World Economic Forum)

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TAGS

202021st Century skills • advanced materials • advanced robotics • artificial intelligence • autonomous transport • biotechnologycareer futurescognitive abilitiescognitive flexibilitycomplex problem-solving • coordinating with others • creativity skillscritical skillscritical thinkingdecision-making capabilitiesdisruptive innovationeconomic change • emotional intelligence • employment opportunitiesexponentially advancing technologiesflexibility and innovation • fourth industrial revolution • future careerfuture casting • future of jobs • genomicsgrowth needsincreasingly complex opportunitiesindustrial revolutionjobsmachine learningnegotiation • people management • predicting the futureproblem-solvingreportroboticsservice design • service orientation • skilled workforcesound judgmentsustaining innovationstransformational innovation • World Economic Forum

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Knowledge Unlatched: a new academic publishing business model

"The Problem: specialist books in the Humanities and Social Sciences (including but not exclusively monographs) are under threat due to spiralling prices and reduced library funds.

Access is restricted: while academics could choose to bypass existing publishers and just post content on the Web, the general consensus within academia is that they would prefer to have their books professionally published.

Only a few hundred copies make it into the eight to twelve thousand research universities, and very few teaching universities have access to these materials. For many individuals private purchase is beyond their reach.

A Possible Solution: cover the costs of creating the first digital copy through a library consortium and make the titles open access. Publishers would continue to generate additional revenues from the sale of print, ePub and PDFs in bespoke formats."

(Frances Pinter, 2011)

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TAGS

2011academiaacademic journals • academic publishing • academics • bespoke format • Bloomsbury Academicbookcontent on the webdigital convergencedigital copyeconomic changeepub • Frances Pinter • groupon • humanities and social sciences • journal subscription • knowledge access • knowledge economy • Knowledge Unlatched • library consortium • long form • long form publication • longform • longform publication • media landscape • monograph • new business modelsnew digital distribution networksold mediaopen accessPDFpeer review • professionally published • publicationpublisherpublishingpublishing model • reduced library funds • research universities • sale of printscholarly journals • specialist books • spiralling prices • teaching universities

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
04 MARCH 2012

New Zealanders need to start more actively dealing with urban issues

"'It is essential that New Zealanders start dealing much more actively with urban issues,' asserts Professor Harvey Perkins, recently appointed Director of Transforming Cities: Innovations for Sustainable Futures (formerly, Transforming Auckland) and Professor of Planning.

'We need to embrace the ideas of 'urban sustainability and liveability',' notions he explores in his most recent publication, Place, Identity and Everyday Life in a Globalizing World, co–authored with Professor David Thorns. This work followed a series of jointly published articles with colleagues at Lincoln University and The University of Auckland critically examining the ways in which sustainability thinking has been interpreted and incorporated in urban planning in New Zealand."

(Jenny Dixon, 16 February 2012)

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TAGS

Aotearoa New ZealandAucklandcities • David Thorns • economic changeenvironmental changeeveryday life • globalizing world • Harvey Perkins • human geographyinterdisciplinary • interdisciplinary urban research • landscape • Lincoln University • liveabilityNew Zealandersperi-urban changeperiurbanisation • research scope • rural social changesociologysustainabilitysustainability thinking • Transforming Auckland • transforming cities • TRI • University of AucklandUniversity of Canterburyurban changeurban issuesurban planningurban researchurban sprawlurban sustainability

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MAY 2011

The Horizon Digital Economy Research research centre

"Horizon will undertake a series of complementary experience projects to envision, create, deploy and study radical new services. Each experience project will involve a multidisciplinary team of technologists, human–scientists, domain experts and innovation facilitators working with users to explore technology, human and business issues in the real world.

The experience projects will include: Creative Visiting; The Connected Journey; Exposing the Footprint

The experience projects will bring into focus the fundamental principles of the underlying technologies, methods and theoretical understandings required to elaborate future services and develop sustainable systems for a digital economy.

Horizon will undertake research in the cross–cutting challenges underlying the digital economy–these will include: The Innovation Challenge; The Human Challenge; The Infrastructural Challenge."

(Horizon Research Institute)

Fig.1 Ben Bedwell VIPR2009 [http://www.flickr.com/photos/vipr2009/4405438963/sizes/l/in/photostream/]

[The Horizon Digital Economy Research is based at the University of Nottingham, UK]

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TAGS

applied research • business issues • connected journey • creative visiting • devicedigital economydiscoverydomain expertseconomic changeengineeringenvisioningexperience project • exposing the footprint • fundamental principles • future services • Horizon Digital Economy Research • human challenges • human issues • human-scientists • infrastructural challenge • innovation • innovation challenge • innovation facilitators • interdisciplinarymultidisciplinarypervasive computing • radical new services • real worldresearch centresolution • sustainable systems • technologiestechnologists • technology issues • ubiquitous computingUKUniversity of Nottingham

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
25 APRIL 2011

Flattr: innovative micropayment service

"Finally, there's 'flattr', which is a nice name. A micropayment service that lets you simply add a button to your stuff to let people make micropayments to you, for your stuff. From back in the mid '60s Ted Nelson had a vision for micropayments, and why it mattered. We are now moving there. This is the beginning of simply catastrophic change for industrial media. Why? Well when I decide that my tiny annual subscription to The Age [Melbourne newspaper] is not worth my $55 (I don't think it is worth that right now actually), and I instead send that money, even as 55 x $1 to 55 other creators I value, the revenue model for industrial media collapses, and a new one arises. The only change I have to make is to recognise that what I spend on purchasing media is merely a habit, and not providing that much value, so rather than just save that money, why not redirect it to those who are making value for me?"

(Adrian Miles, 20 April 2011, vlog 4.0)

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TAGS

changeconsumptioncontentdigital contentdonationeconomic changeenterpriseentrepreneurship • Flattr • habit • income • industrial media • information ageinnovationinteractionknowledge-based economy • micropayment service • micropayments • moneynewspaperold media • paid • payments • purchasing media • reimbursement • revenue modelsocial mediasubscriptionSwedenTed Nelsonvalue

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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