Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Imaginary Landscapes' keyword pg.1 of 1
29 JANUARY 2015

The Codex Seraphinianus by Luigi Serafini

1

2

3

4

5

TAGS

1981alien beings • alien writing system • anatomies • art book • bipedal creatures • bizarre games • bizarre imagerybizarre machines • bizarre vehicles • burial customs • Codex Seraphinianus (1981) • colour illustrations • delicate appearance • dining practicesdivergent conceptsencyclopaedia • fantaencyclopedia • fantastical science • fantastical worlds • funereal customs • futuristic machines • hallucinogenic • hand-drawn illustrationillustrated book • illustrated encyclopaedia • imaginary landscapesimaginary worlds • Italian artist • ludic intervention • Luigi Serafini • mutant scienceorganism • pencil illustrations • plant life • psychedelic imagery • senseless machines • speculative architecturespeculative biology • speculative chemistry • speculative physics • strange flowers • surreal landscape • surrealist illustration • weird book • writing system

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 APRIL 2013

Colourful cut-out card illustrations by Eiko Ojala

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 DECEMBER 2012

Verknipte tijden / Distorted times

Fig.1 Gideon van der Stelt (2012). "Verknipte tijden / Distorted times", collage of existing film fragments, released into my paper–folded version of Utrecht. Shot on a 7D and processed in After Effects.

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Andy Love
03 JUNE 2011

The hospital, contains the complete arsenal of modern healing, but is devoted to a radical deescalation of the medical process

"The hospital is a sequence of pavilions, each devoted to a particular disease. They are connected by a medical boulevard –a slow–moving belt that displays the sick in a continuous procession, with a group of dancing nurses in transparent uniforms, medical equipment disguised as totem poles, and rich perfumes that suppress the familiar stench of healing, in an almost festive atmosphere of operatic melodies.

Doctors select their patients from this belt, invite them to their individual pavilions, test their vitality, and almost playfully administer their (medical) knowledge. If they fail, the patient is returned to the conveyer; perhaps another doctor tries the patient, but it soon becomes apparent that the belt leads beyond the pavilions, through the cruciform building, and straight into the cemetery."

(Koolhaas, R., M. Vreisendorp, et al.)

Fig.1 – 9 Rem Koolhaas, Madelon Vreisendorp, Elia Zenghelis, and Zoe Zenghelis (1972). 'Exodus, or the voluntary prisoners of architecture'

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

TAGS

1972appropriation • architectural sequence • arsenal • boulevardcemeterycollage • continuous procession • conveyer belt • cruciform • cut-outcut-out illustrationdancingdiseasedoctor • Elia Zenghelis • exodus • festive atmosphere • graphic style • healing • hospitalillustrationimaginary landscapes • Madelon Vreisendorp • medical boulevard • medical equipment • medical knowledge • medical process • melody • modern healing • nurseoperationpatientpavilionperfumephotocollagephotomontageplayful • prisoners of architecture • radical deescalation • Rem Koolhaassequencespace-framespatial narrativesspeculative design • totem poles • uniform • urban speculation • vitality • Zoe Zenghelis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 OCTOBER 2009

Experimental Victorian Photocollage

"Sixty years ahead of the avant–garde, aristocratic Victorian women were already experimenting with photocollage. The compositions they made with photographs and watercolors are whimsical and fantastical, combining human heads and animal bodies, placing people into imaginary landscapes, and morphing faces into common household objects. With sharp wit and dramatic shifts of scale akin to those Alice experienced in Wonderland, these images stand the rather serious conventions of photography in the 1860s and 1870s on their heads.

Such images, often made for albums, reveal the educated minds as well as accomplished hands of their makers, as they take on new theories of evolution, the changing role of photography, and the strict conventions of aristocratic society. Together they provide a fascinating window into the creative possibilities of photography in the Victorian era and enduring inspiration for photographic experimentation today."

(The Art Institute of Chicago, 2009)

Marie–Blanche–Hennelle Fournier, 1831–1906

1

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.