Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Survey' keyword pg.1 of 2
22 OCTOBER 2013

Project Management and Business Analysis Guides

"The Project Service Centre (PSC) role within CSU is to establish sound Project Management (PM) principles throughout the organisation. This will provide a means of clearly identifying the true needs of the University and help facilitate those desired outcomes.

To achieve these objectives, the PSC must provide and enhance the methodology for project management and business analysis, including guides and templates. This particular section concentrates on a set of guides which recommends how different processes can be undertaken."

(Charles Sturt University)

TAGS

enefits analysis • brainstormingbusiness analysisbusiness analystbusiness communicationbusiness logicbusiness management • business process modelling • Charles Sturt University • conducting meetings • cost estimatedecision makingdocument analysis • echnical specification • elicitation practices • elicitation process • engineering process • financial analysis • focus group • functional decomposition • gathering requirements • interface analysis • interviewingmodelling and prototyping • needs analysis • PowerPoint lectureproblem-solvingproject managementprototypingquestionnaire • requirements analysis • requirements elicitationrequirements engineeringrequirements gatheringrequirements process • requirements workshop • reverse engineeringrole playingshared practicessoftware engineering • stakeholder interviews • surveysystem requirementsuse casesuser activity data • user observation • workshops

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 DECEMBER 2012

University students face a constant stream of questionnaires designed to assess the standard of their courses

"I'm more bothered by the underlying assumptions about what makes good university teaching that lie behind many of these surveys. You can see them particularly clearly in the National Student Survey, and the reams of student feedback it publishes online – explicitly, so it says, to help prospective students choose a good course, and to help universities 'enhance the student learning experience'. ...

OK, I can see how at first sight that might seem obvious. Who, after all, wants to see their kids go off to university, at great expense, for a diet of dis–satisfaction? But, from where I sit, dissatisfaction and discomfort have their own, important, role to play in a good university education. We're aiming to push our students to think differently, to move out of their intellectual comfort zone, to read and discuss texts that are almost too hard for them to manage. It is, and it's meant to be, destabilizing.

At the same time, we're urging them never to be satisfied with the arguments they are presented with, never to take things on trust, always to challenge, always to see the weak points, or to want to push the argument further. Then along comes the National Survey, treats them as consumers, and asks them if they're satisfied."

(Mary Beard, BBC News, 2 December 2012)

1

TAGS

2012anonymityassumptionsbureaucratic reductionchallenging conventional thinkingcomfort zoneconsumer culturecriticismcustomer satisfactiondepersonalising • destabilizing • discontent • dissatisfactionHigher Education Funding Council • honesty • Mary Beard • National Student Surveyperformativitypower without responsibilityquestionnaire • RateMyProfessor • satisfaction • satisfied consumers • satisfied students • student feedback • student learning experience • suggestions • surveysurvey form • survey-fatigue • surveysteaching • think differently • TripAdvisor • trusttrust and reliabilityundergraduateuniversityuniversity educationuniversity teaching • useful comments

CONTRIBUTOR

Phil Nodding
10 APRIL 2012

VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study: Case Study for the pragmatic direct digital capture of artworks from the Surrey Institute of Art and Design

"The VADS Fine Art Project aims to bring together, through a distributed digitisation model, artworks from across Higher Education Institutes (HEIs) that can serve to exemplify the history and achievement of fine art education and practice in this country since its inception in the 1850s.

In the initial stages of the project, a survey was sent out to all the Higher Education Institutions in the UK that taught fine art, in order to elicit whether or not student and staff work had been kept or documented. From this survey it was found that many colleges failed or had ceased to collect artworks due to the cost implications of purchasing, storing and insuring the works, leading to the output of many art colleges remaining undocumented.

As the Fine Art Project progressed, protocols for the digital capture, documentation and copyright clearance of work were established. These were then used to collect works from around the country to be included in the National Fine Art Education Digital Collection. However, given their inherent useable and easily applicable nature, it was thought the same protocols could be just as useful to digitally capture, document and rights–clear works within HEIs as and when they were being produced. This would make it far easier and affordable for colleges to capture and maintain collections of their present and past work, as well as offering additional benefits such as making them widely available on the Internet or for other publishing requirements."

(Ed Bremner, 1 September 2003 [last modified: 28th March 2006], Institute for Learning and Research Technology)

1

TAGS

1850s2003AHDS Visual Artsartworkartworks • capture and maintain collections • case study • collect works • collecting artworks • collectioncopyright clearance • cost implications • digital capture • digitally capture • digitisation • direct digital capture • distributed digitisation model • documentation • documented • fine art • fine art education • fine art practice • Fine Art Project • HEI • Higher Education Institutes • higher education institutions • history and achievement • image management system • insuring artworks • Internetknowledge management • National Fine Art Education Digital Collection • pilot project • pilot study • present and past work • protocol • publishing requirements • purchasing artworks • raw filerepository • SIAD • storing artworks • student and staff work • Surrey Institute of Art and Design • surveyUKVADS • VADS Fine Art Project • VADS Fine Art Project Digital Capture Pilot Study

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 JANUARY 2011

The Art of the Email Interview

"Our first iteration of the email interview was something like an open–ended survey. It explained the project and supplied the appropriate participant information and consent forms. Then, it listed the questions. It was in many ways a participant friendly version of the interview guide.

While the turnaround on the email interview surveys was really good from a time perspective, we felt that the answers we were getting were very short, to the point, and formal. This is in contrast to our in–person interviews, where answers to one question would often meander through several equally interesting subjects in the process of their completion.

So I thought a lot about how the in–person interviews were different from the email interviews, and I realized it was that with in–person interviews, the participant doesn't know all of the questions you will be asking up front. Usually we tell them what kind of questions we will be asking, or what kind of information we are looking for, but the specific questions are unknown. As a result, the participant will often include a lot more information in the answer to each question. There was something about seeing all of the questions all at once that was cutting off this meandering; something about having all of the questions in front of the participant at once made the answers short and to the point.

So our solution was to send email interview questions one at a time.

This was a tremendous success. When we sent the questions one at a time, the answers were long, rich, and varied. ...

We have tried out the second iteration of email interviewing on several participants, and have been blown away with their responses.

There are probably restrictions that come with this method. It is probably not appropriate for people who do not normally communicate via text–based mediums. (Our participants are very comfortable with the written communication of the internet, so in our case this has not been an issue.) It might also be less appealing to very busy executives–our coursemate Cora is doing a project with such folks, and she feels that her participants would become irritated with the process after three questions."

(Rachel Shadoan, 31 July 2010)

TAGS

consent forms • email interview • email interviewingemail interviewsethnographic methodsethnographic researchethnography • Facebook interview • in-person • in-person interviews • information gatheringinterview (research method) • interview guide • interview questions • meander • meandering • mediated environments • open-ended survey • participant • participant information • research dialoguesresearch methodsocial mediasocial media researchersurvey • text-based mediums • written communication

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 NOVEMBER 2009

uberVU: monitor the collective consciousness

"uberVU is an easy way to find and follow conversations, even if they take place across multiple sites and services.

The interesting stories you read on the Web don't show you the whole picture. The conversation around them is missing. What people say about those stories is a great part of the picture.

The conversation around those stories takes place across many services. You might upload a video on YouTube that gets embedded in a blog post. That post gets comments and it gets posted on Twitter, where it also gets some replies. The Twitter post gets to FriendFeed where the conversation continues.

All of this is part of a single conversation, but you can't see it because it's trapped inside different services. That's where uberVU comes in."

(uberVU, 2009)

1

TAGS

2009cluster mappingcollective consciousnessconvergencedata miningdigital culture • FriendFeed • innovationmememonitor • noosphere • Romaniasearchsocial identitysurveytechnologyTwitter • uberVU • vox populi • Web 2.0YouTubezeitgeist

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
Sign-In

Sign-In to Folksonomy

Can't access your account?

New to Folksonomy?

Sign-Up or learn more.