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Which clippings match 'Digital Humanities' keyword pg.1 of 3
23 JUNE 2015

Moritz Stefaner: Selfiecity

Moritz Stefaner speaking about his work on the Selfiecity.net project (part 2) at the 'Visualized' conference in New York, 6-7 February 2014.

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2014 • Alise Tifentale • amateur cultural production • Amazon Mechanical Turk • BangkokBerlinbig databrowsing interfacecitiescognitive sciencecultural artefactscultural specificity • Daniel Goddemeyer • data abstraction • data filtering • data visualisation • design collaboration • design conferencedigital humanities • Dominikus Baur • faceface recognitionfaces of peoplefacial analysisfacial compositefiltering • human activity • information aestheticsinformation visualisationInstagram • Jay Chow • Lev Manovich • mass selfie • Mehrdad Yazdani • Moritz Stefaner • Moscow • Nadav Hochman • new media artNew Yorkportrait photographSan PaoloselfieSelfiecity (2014)social media projecttelematicsTokyo • University of Applied Sciences Potsdam • University of Osnabrueck • video lecturevisualising dataVisualized conference

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
05 SEPTEMBER 2014

The Largest Vocabulary in Hip hop

"Literary elites love to rep Shakespeare's vocabulary: across his entire corpus, he uses 28,829 words, suggesting he knew over 100,000 words and arguably had the largest vocabulary, ever.

I decided to compare this data point against the most famous artists in hip hop. I used each artist's first 35,000 lyrics. That way, prolific artists, such as Jay–Z, could be compared to newer artists, such as Drake.

35,000 words covers 3–5 studio albums and EPs. I included mixtapes if the artist was just short of the 35,000 words. Quite a few rappers don't have enough official material to be included (e.g., Biggie, Kendrick Lamar). As a benchmark, I included data points for Shakespeare and Herman Melville, using the same approach (35,000 words across several plays for Shakespeare, first 35,000 of Moby Dick).

I used a research methodology called token analysis to determine each artist's vocabulary. Each word is counted once, so pimps, pimp, pimping, and pimpin are four unique words. To avoid issues with apostrophes (e.g., pimpin' vs. pimpin), they're removed from the dataset. It still isn't perfect. Hip hop is full of slang that is hard to transcribe (e.g., shorty vs. shawty), compound words (e.g., king shit), featured vocalists, and repetitive choruses.

It's still directionally interesting. Of the 85 artists in the dataset, let's take a look at who is on top."

(Matt Daniels, May 2014)

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benchmark • big vocabulary • choice of words • corpus • cultural expressiondatasetdictiondigital humanitiesEnglish languageexpressive repertoireexpressive vocabulary • extensive vocabulary • Herman Melville • hip-hop • lexicomane • lyrics • Matt Daniels • Moby Dick • musicnaming • pimp • raprapperresearch method • sesquipedalian • slang • speaking vocabulary • token analysis • use of wordsvocabularyWilliam Shakespeareword heapwords

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
20 MARCH 2014

Information visualisation through the analysis of image sources

Lev Manovich speaking about his work on the Selfiecity.net project (part 1) at the 'Visualized' conference in New York, 6-7 February 2014.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 OCTOBER 2013

Data Journalism Handbook 1.0

"This website is dedicated to providing anyone interested in getting started with data driven journalism with a collection of learning resources, including relevant events, tools, tutorials, interviews and case studies. The data journalism community and mailing list are dedicated to strengthening the community of journalists, designers, data providers and others, and encouraging collaboration and exchange of expertise."

(European Journalism Centre)

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2013analysing dataanalysis data • analysis model • analysis of quantitative informationdatadata analysisdata collection and analysis • data driven journalism • data gathering instrumentsdata infrastructuredata into informationdata journalism • Data Journalism Handbook • data miningdata-drivendigital humanitiesdigital journalism • Dutch Ministry of Education Culture and Science • European Journalism Centre (EJC) • handbookhistorical datajournalismOpen Knowledge Foundationquantitative dataquantitative informationstatisticstrend analysis

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 JANUARY 2013

Big Data: Text Mining in the Digital Humanities

"Not surprisingly the focus on research methodology in the presentations was also explicitly articulated as an important aspect of drawing out a scholarly practice for the Digital Humanities. It was emphasized that the disclosure of the philosophical and technological rational behind a research methodology is important to develop a sort of academic accountability. These methodological choices are deliberate and meaningfully affect the results of a study.

The rigorous process of explaining and justifying the methodological process is in effect a safe guard against spurious use of computational and statistical tools. 'Big Data' will not allow for humanistic arguments to be proved statistically. Instead it is about producing a dialectic between analytic and anecdotal, such that the computational tools of computers can be assimilated into the process of humanistic scholarship. An important aspect of this is to develop meaningful visualizations to render data readable."

(Mark Turcato, 18 May 2012, Digital Humanities McGill)

TAGS

academic accountability • affect the results of a study • analytic • anecdotal • big data • computational tools • computational tools of computers • data analysis • deliberate and meaningfully • dialectic between analytic and anecdotal • digital humanitiesdisclosure • explaining and justifying • humanistic • humanistic arguments • humanistic scholarship • McGill University • meaningful visualisations • methodological choices • methodological process • philosophical rational • process of humanistic scholarship • proved statistically • render data readable • research methodology • rigorous process • rigourrobustness • safeguard • scholarly practice • spurious use • statistical analysis • statistical tools • technological rationa

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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