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Which clippings match 'Information Technology' keyword pg.1 of 2
02 MARCH 2014

TED: simply toying with risk so as to re-affirm the comfortable?

"We hear that not only is change accelerating but that the pace of change is accelerating as well. While this is true of computational carrying–capacity at a planetary level, at the same time ––and in fact the two are connected–– we are also in a moment of cultural de–acceleration. We invest our energy in futuristic information technologies, including our cars, but drive them home to kitsch architecture copied from the 18th century. The future on offer is one in which everything changes, so long as everything stays the same. We'll have Google Glass, but still also business casual. This timidity is our path to the future? No, this is incredibly conservative, and there is no reason to think that more Gigaflops will inoculate us. Because, if a problem is in fact endemic to a system, then the exponential effects of Moore's Law also serve to amplify what's broken. It is more computation along the wrong curve, and I don't think this is necessarily a triumph of reason. Part of my work explores deep technocultural shifts, from post–humanism to the post–anthropocene, but TED's version has too much faith in technology, and not nearly enough commitment to technology. It is placebo technoradicalism, toying with risk so as to re–affirm the comfortable. So our machines get smarter and we get stupider. But it doesn't have to be like that. Both can be much more intelligent. Another futurism is possible."

(Benjamin Bratton, 20 December 2013)

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TAGS

2013 • American Idol (reality television) • astrophysics • Benjamin Bratton • bright futures • business casual • California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology • call to actioncommunicate to the massescomplex issuescomplexitycultural changecultural transformation • design and geopoltics • egalitarian utopia • epiphany • epiphimony • frightening problems • Google Glass • information technology • infotainment • insight and realisation • intellectual viability • kitsch architecture • Kony2012meaningful ideas • middlebrow megachurch infotainment • moment of wonder • oversimplificationpersonal journeypersonal revelationpersonal story • personal testimony • placebo innovation • placebo medicine • placebo politics • placebo science • placebo technoradicalism • popularisation • re-affirm the comfortable • reductionism • rhetorical device • San Diego • smart people • smart things • swallowed without chewing • technological determinismtechnology and culturetechnology innovationTED Talks • toying with risk • triumphs and tribulations • University of California • vicarious insight • world-changing ideas

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2013

New International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation

"International Journal of Design Creativity and Innovation is an international publication that provides a forum for discussing the nature and potential of creativity and innovation in design from both theoretical and practical perspectives. Design creativity and innovation is truly an interdisciplinary academic research field that will interest and stimulate researchers of engineering design, industrial design, architecture, art, and similar areas. The journal aims to not only promote existing research disciplines but also pioneer a new one that lies in the intermediate area between the domains of systems engineering, information technology, computer science, social science, artificial intelligence, cognitive science, psychology, philosophy, linguistics, and related fields. The journal welcomes various kinds of research papers (analytical studies, constructive studies, case studies, field studies, literature surveys, etc.) that will establish the basis for the academic discipline of design creativity and innovation."

TAGS

2013academic journal • analogical reasoning • architectural designartificial intelligencecognitive scienceconcept generation • constructive studies • creativity and innovation • design creativity • design creativity and innovation • design educationdesign innovationdesign inspirationdesign researcher • design synthesis • design theoryengineering design • field studies • in-betweenindustrial designinformation technologyinnovative explorations • innovative process • interdisciplinary researchinternational journal • inventive process • inventive worklinguisticsliteraturephilosophypsychology • research field • research papersocial science • systems engineering • Taylor and Francis • theories on design • visual arts research

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
02 AUGUST 2012

Le Minitel Bye Bye on 30 June 2012

"Après 30 ans d'existence, le Minitel s'apprête à tirer sa révérence. Les plus jeunes ne verront même pas de quoi il est question, mais ceux qui étaient au collège ou au lycée dans les années 90 s'en rappelleront peut–être pour avoir recherché dessus leurs résultats aux examens du brevet ou du bac. Le Minitel, ou l'ancêtre d'internet ! Invention 100 % française, le 1er réseau dans l'histoire des télécommunications à permettre la 'connexion de terminaux permettant la visualisation de données informatiques' disparaîtra le 30 Juin 2012, et avec lui la machine à l'origine du fameux '36–15″. Définitivement la fin d'une époque.

After 30 years of existence, the Minitel is preparing to take its final bow. The youngest will not even see what it is about, but those who were in college or high school in the 90s will remember perhaps have looked over their test scores. The Minitel, or the ancestor of the Internet ! 100% French invention, the first network in the history of telecommunications to allow 'terminal connection to visualization of computer data' will draw his bow on June 30, 2012, and with it the machine behind the famous '36 – 15 '. Definitely the end of an era."

(Vincent Laserson, 31 May 2012, De Jeunes Gens Modernes)

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TAGS

1980s19822012 • adult chatrooms • Apple Mac • beige plastic kitsch • chat roomcommunicationscybersex • De Jeunes Gens Modernes • design classic • deviceend of an eraFranceFrench • French invention • important technologiesinformation ageinformation technologyInternetle Minitel • Little French Box • Macintosh computerMinitel • Minitel Rose • network informationobsolescenceobsolete technologyprecursor technologyproduct designredundant technologysocial networkingSteve Jobstechnological innovationtelecommunicationstelephoneterminal connectiontransitional technologies • Ulla • user-friendly • world wide web • yellow pages

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
17 FEBRUARY 2012

Network: our identities revealed through our network traffic

"Information technology has become a ubiquitous presence. By visualizing the processes that underlie our interactions with this technology we can trace what happens to the information we feed into the network."

(Michael Rigley)

Fig.1 "Network" by Michael Rigley.

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TAGS

animated presentationdata • data preservation • data retention • design situations • digital identitydigital representationinformation aesthetics • information feed • information sector • information technologyInternet trafficISP • location data • metadata • Michael Rigley • MMSnetwork informationnetwork traffic • our information • retention period • service provider • surveillancetechnology infrastructuretracetraffic analysistransactiontransaction data • ubiquitous presence • visualisation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 MARCH 2011

A simple abstract model of human communication

"One of the first designs of the information theory is the model of communication by Shannon and Weaver. Claude Shannon, an engineer at Bell Telephone Laboratories, worked with Warren Weaver on the classic book 'The mathematical theory of communication'. In this work Shannon and Weaver sought to identify the quickest and most efficient way to get a message from one point to another. Their goal was to discover how communication messages could be converted into electronic signals most efficiently, and how those signals could be transmitted with a minimum of error. In studying this, Shannon and Weaver developed a mechanical and mathematical model of communication, known as the 'Shannon and Weaver model of communication'. ...

Shannon and Weaver broadly defined communication as 'all of the procedures by which one mind may affect another'. Their communication model consisted of an information source: the source's message, a transmitter, a signal, and a receiver: the receiver's message, and a destination. Eventually, the standard communication model featured the source or encoder, who encodes a message by translating an idea into a code in terms of bits. A code is a language or other set of symbols or signs that can be used to transmit a thought through one or more channels to elicit a response in a receiver or decoder. Shannon and Weaver also included the factor noise into the model. The study conducted by Shannon and Weaver was motivated by the desire to increase the efficiency and accuracy or fidelity of transmission and reception. Efficiency refers to the bits of information per second that can be sent and received. Accuracy is the extent to which signals of information can be understood. In this sense, accuracy refers more to clear reception than to the meaning of message. This engineering model asks quite different questions than do other approaches to human communication research."

(Communication Studies, University of Twente)

Shannon, C.E., & Weaver, W. (1949). The mathematical theory of communication. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Hawes, L.C. (1975). Pragmatics of analoguing: Theory and model construction in communication. Reading, MA: Addison–Wesley.

Fig.1 Mathematical (information) model of communication.

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TAGS

abstract modelabstractionaccuracyBell LabsBell Telephone LaboratoriesClaude Shannon • communicating system • communicationcommunication processcommunication theorydisorderefficiencyentropyfidelity • human communication research • information technologyinformation theorymeaning makingmessagemodel of communicationnoise • output • pioneeringpredictabilityrandomness • receiver • reception • redundancysignalsymbolsystems approachsystems theorytheory of communication • transmission • transmission model of communicationtransmitter • University of Twente • Warren Weaver

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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