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Which clippings match 'Human-computer Interaction' keyword pg.1 of 4
07 JUNE 2015

Project Soli: control electronic devices without physical contact

"Google has unveiled an interaction sensor that uses radar to translate subtle hand movements into gesture controls for electronic devices, with the potential to transform the way they're designed (+ movie).

Project Soli was one of the developments revealed by Google's Advanced Technology and Progress (ATAP) group during the company's I/O developer conference in San Francisco last week. The team has created a tiny sensor that fits onto a chip. The sensor is able to track sub-millimetre hand gestures at high speed and accuracy with radar, and use them to control electronic devices without physical contact."

(2 June 2015, Dezeen)

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TAGS

2015Dezeen • dial • digital controls • electronic devices • future interfaces • gesture controls • gesture deviceGoogle Advanced Technology and Projects group (ATAP) • hand gestures • haptic device • haptic feedback • haptic interfacehuman-computer interactioninput device • interaction sensor • intuitive interface • Ivan Poupyrev • knobs • Leap Motion Controllermanipulate things • motion detection • motion tracking • movement detection • pliabilityprecision • Project Soli • radar • radio frequency • rubbing • sensorspatial interaction • sub-millimetre accuracy • subtle hand movements • swiping gesturetracking • turning a dial • virtual dial • wearable computing • wearables • without physical contact • working with our hands

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
24 OCTOBER 2014

What if scenario used to paper prototype DynaBook tablet interface

"In 1968 Kay created a very interesting concept – the Dynabook. He wanted to make A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages – a thin portable computer, highly dynamic device that weighed no more than two pounds The ideas led to the development of the Xerox Alto prototype, which was originally called the interim Dynabook. It embodied all the elements of a graphical user interface, or GUI, as early as 1972. The software component of this research was Smalltalk, which went on to have a life of its own independent of the Dynabook concept."

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
23 OCTOBER 2014

Describing social and material interactions through formal methods

"To some extent, Formal Methods sit uneasily within interaction design. Human beings are rich, complex, nuanced, engaged in subtle and skilful social and material interactions; reducing this to any sort of formal description seems at best simplistic. And yet that is precisely what we have to do once we create any sort of digital system: whether an iPhone or an elevator, Angry Birds or Facebook, software is embedded in our lives. However much we design devices and products to meet users' needs or enrich their experiences of life, still the software inside is driven by the soulless, precise, and largely deterministic logic of code. If you work with computers, you necessarily work with formalism.

Formal Methods sit in this difficult nexus between logic and life, precision and passion, both highlighting the contradictions inherent in interaction design and offering tools and techniques to help understand and resolve them.

In fact, anyone engaged in interaction design is likely to have used some kind of formal representation, most commonly some sort of arrow and sketch diagram showing screens/pages in an application and the movements between them. While there are many more complex formal notations and methods, these simple networks of screens and links demonstrate the essence of a formal representation. Always, some things are reduced or ignored (the precise contents of screens), whilst others are captured more faithfully (the pattern of links between them). This enables us to focus on certain aspects and understand or analyse those aspects using the representation itself (for example notice that there are some very long interaction paths to quite critical screens)."

(Alan J. Dix, 2013)

Dix, Alan J. (2013): Formal Methods. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human–Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at https://www.interaction–design.org/encyclopedia/formal_methods.html

TAGS

abstract system models • Alan Dix • arrow and sketch diagram • context awareness • context-aware interfaces • design methods • design products • deterministic logic • dialogue models • digital devices • digital interactions • digital system • executable models • formal abstraction • formal analysis • formal description • formal design methods • formal methods • formal notation • formal representations • formalised principleshuman-computer interactioninteraction designInteraction Design Foundation • material interactions • notation • physical context • physical interactionphysigrams • product design process • product development methodologyrepresentationrich descriptionsrich user experienceshaping our relationship to the material worldsocial interactionssoftware modellingspace syntax • specification language • state machines • state transition network • structured approach • system behaviour • tangible interfacestechnology affordancesusability testinguser experienceuser-based evaluationworld around us • world representations

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
09 DECEMBER 2013

User interaction using the Leap Motion Controller

"The Leap Motion Controller senses how you naturally move your hands and lets you use your computer in a whole new way. Point, wave, reach, grab. Pick something up and move it."

(Leap Motion, Inc)

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
18 NOVEMBER 2013

Donald Norman: what are affordances?

Fig. 1 Donald Norman (1994). "Defending Human Attributes in the Age of the Machine" – CD–ROM from 1994.

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