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Which clippings match 'Action Research' keyword pg.1 of 2
03 MARCH 2015

Chapter 2: Doing Research in the Real World by David Gray

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TAGS

2009action research • analytical surveys • constructivismcritical enquiry • David Gray • deductive reasoning • descriptive studies • epistemological perspectives • epistemologyethnography • exploratory studies • feminismhermeneutics • heuristic enquiry • inductive and deductive reasoning • inductive reasoning • interpretive studies • interpretivismJohn DeweymethodologyMichael Crottymultiple methods • naturalistic enquiry • objectivism • ontological perspectives • ontology • phenomenological research • phenomenologypositivismpostmodernismpragmatismrealismresearch approachesresearch methodologiesresearch methodologyresearch methods • research perspectives • research strategiessubjectivismsymbolic interactionismtheoretical perspectives

CONTRIBUTOR

Liam Birtles
19 MAY 2014

Defining features of practice-based and practice-led research

"Practice-based Research is an original investigation undertaken in order to gain new knowledge partly by means of practice and the outcomes of that practice. Claims of originality and contribution to knowledge may be demonstrated through creative outcomes which may include artefacts such as images, music, designs, models, digital media or other outcomes such as performances and exhibitions Whilst the significance and context of the claims are described in words, a full understanding can only be obtained with direct reference to those outcomes. A practice-based PhD is distinguishable from a conventional PhD because creative outcomes from the research process may be included in the submission for examination and the claim for an original contribution to the field are held to be demonstrated through the original creative work.

Practice-based doctoral submissions must include a substantial contextualisation of the creative work. This critical appraisal or analysis not only clarifies the basis of the claim for the originality and location of the original work, it also provides the basis for a judgement as to whether general scholarly requirements are met. This could be defined as judgement of the submission as a contribution to knowledge in the field, showing doctoral level powers of analysis and mastery of existing contextual knowledge, in a form that is accessible to and auditable by knowledgeable peers.

Practice-led Research is concerned with the nature of practice and leads to new knowledge that has operational significance for that practice. The main focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. In a doctoral thesis, the results of practice-led research may be fully described in text form without the inclusion of a creative outcome. The primary focus of the research is to advance knowledge about practice, or to advance knowledge within practice. Such research includes practice as an integral part of its method and often falls within the general area of action research. The doctoral theses that emerge from this type of practice related research are not the same as those that include artefacts and works as part of the submission."

(Creativity and Cognition Studios, University of Technology Sydney)

TAGS

action research • advance knowledge about practice • advance knowledge within practice • central practice element • contextual knowledge • contribution to knowledge • contribution to knowledge in the field • conventional PhD • creative artefact • creative artefacts • creative outcome • creative outcomes • creative work contextualisation • Creativity and Cognition Studios (CCS)critical analysis • critical appraisal • digital media practice • doctoral level analysis • doctoral submission • doctoral theses • doctoral thesis • exegesis • knowledge about practice • knowledgeable peers • mastery • nature of practice • new knowledge • new knowledge by means of practice • new understandings about practice • operational significance for that practice • original contribution to the field • original creative work • original investigation • original work • originalitypractice-basedpractice-based PhDspractice-based researchpractice-ledpractice-led researchresearch processresearch scholarship • research types • scholarly requirements • submission for examination • types of research • University of Technology Sydney

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
29 OCTOBER 2013

Using a Recording Template as part of a Reflective Practice Model

"An RT [Recording Template] is required to collate this evidence forming a framework from which we will annotate the project's life cycle. This reflection will bring about a direct interface with the learning contract (LC) objectives and help shape and control the project as it occurs. Alongside the RT, a daily journal will also be kept and all the notes of communication from peers logged and referred back to. This triangulation of data, will allow me to gain a sense of perspective towards my research. The different evidence will qualify a more balanced view of events."

(James Kelway, 31 March 2005)

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action researchannotationsBob DickCal Swann • daily journal • data triangulation • Donald Schon • evidence forming • evidence gatheringhigher education • James Kelway • James McKernan • Jean McNiff • Josey-Bass • Kogen Page • learning contract • lifecycle model • Ortrunn Zuber-Skeritt • practice of design • professional developmentproject method • project reflection • project work • recording template • reflective journalreflective practitionerresearch method • Rizal Sebastian • triangulation

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
14 AUGUST 2013

Action Learning, Action Research Association: Australasian Conference 2013

"The ALARA 2013 Australasian Conference will be held at Riverglenn, Brisbane, Australia on 23–24 September 2013. The conference will provide an opportunity for professional and personal development and renewal of practitioners in business, government, education and community sectors. Around the theme 'Creating a Better World', the conference will investigate how individuals, organisations and communities contribute to handing on a better world. We have presenters coming from the United Kingdom, United States of America, Malaysia, Singapore, Vanuatu and most states of Australia."

TAGS

2013action learningAction Learning Action Research Associationaction researchALARA • ALARA 2013 Australasian Conference • Arizio Sweeting • Australasian conference • AustraliaBrisbanecollaborative learningconference • creating a better world • Emmanuel Tetteh • Michael Dent • strategic network • sustainable societytransformationtransformational engagement • transformational practices • transforming businesses • transforming colleges • transforming communities • transforming governments • transforming schools • transforming universities • transforming voluntary organisations • transforming workplaces

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
13 NOVEMBER 2011

Life Drama: Participatory Action Research

"Action Research is generally considered a process for achieving change and research at the same time. It is viewed as a spiralling, iterative process, with each cycle feeding into the next.

At the 'Plan' stage, the researchers determine the problem to be solved, the steps to be taken to solve the problem, and the methods to be used to evaluate how successful the solution has been. At the 'Act' stage, the agreed steps are taken. At the 'Collect' stage, the researchers collect data to determine whether change has occurred. At the 'Reflect' stage, the researchers analyse the data, discuss the findings, and determine to what extent the 'action' has helped to solve the problem. As a result of this reflection, further planning occurs, to decide what needs to happen next, and the cycle begins again.

Participatory Action Research places specific emphasis on power relationships, advocating for power to be deliberately shared between the 'researchers' and the 'researched'. Ideally, the 'researched', or the people who are expected to benefit from the action research project, are not 'objects' or 'subjects' or research but partners in the research process. They participate in planning, acting, collecting data, reflecting, and deciding how the action research cycle should continue in the next phase. In particular, the participants or co–researchers play a major role in nominating indicators, or criteria by which the project can be said to have succeeded."

(Life Drama, 2010)

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action research • action research cycle • action research project • advocacy • Brad Haseman • co-researcher • Life Drama • Marie Stopes International PNG • National AIDS Council Secretariat • Papua New Guinea • PAR Process • participationParticipatory Action Research • partners in the research process • Porgera Joint Venture • power • power relationships • power sharing • Queensland University of Technology • researched • researchers • University of Goroka • University of Papua New Guinea

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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