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Which clippings match 'Jean-Baptiste Poquelin' keyword pg.1 of 1
22 FEBRUARY 2015

Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life

"From ancient times to the present 'spectacle' (the visual aspects of human performance–architecture, scenery, costumes, makeup, lighting, special effects, and staging) has been used to expressively embody and evoke meaning in rituals, ceremonies, and artistic performances. This course [Eye Appeal: Spectacle on Stage and in Life at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro] will examine the use of spectacle as an expressive mode of communication in human performance from antiquity to the present."

(Bob Hansen, 2004)

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TAGS

2004 • aesthetician • antiquityart historyartifice • artistic performances • Ben Jonson • Bryan Holmes • ceremony • Cinquecento • circus • commanding form • costume design • court spectacles • creation of spectacle • dramatic literature • entertainment spectacle • expressive mode of communication • eyecatching • George Kernodle • high renaissance • human performance • Inigo Jones • Jean-Baptiste Poquelin • John Lahr • Jonathan Price • lecture programmeLeonardo da Vincilightingmake-upMichelangelo • Moliere • parade • Phyllis Hartnoll • physiological reactions • psychological reactions • public showsRaphael • religious rites • renaissanceritualscene designsceneryscenographysetting • Shakespeare • show (spectacle)special effectsspectacle • spectacles • spetakel • stage magic • stagecraft • staging • Susanne Langer • Sybil Rosenfeld • technical theatre • theatre architecture • Thomas Heck • TitianTiziano • Tiziano Vecelli • Tiziano Vecellio • University of North Carolina • University of North Carolina at Greensboro • visual and performance elements • visual spectaclevisual spectacular • visually striking

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
12 OCTOBER 2009

The Hedgehog and The Fox: An Essay on Tolstoy's View of History

"There is a line among the fragments of the Greek poet Archilochus which says: 'The fox knows many things, but the hedgehog knows one big thing.' Scholars have differed about the correct interpretation of these dark words, which may mean no more than that the fox, for all his cunning, is defeated by the hedgehog's one defence. But, taken figuratively, the words can be made to yield a sense in which they mark one of the deepest differences which divide writers and thinkers, and, it may be, human beings in general. For there exists a great chasm between those, on one side, who relate everything to a single central vision, one system, less or more coherent or articulate, in terms of which they understand, think and feel – a single, universal, organising principle in terms of which alone all that they are and say has significance – and, on the other side, those who pursue many ends, often unrelated and even contradictory, connected, if at all, only in some de facto way, for some psychological or physiological cause, related to no moral or aesthetic principle. These last lead lives, perform acts and entertain ideas that are centrifugal rather than centripetal; their thought is scattered or diffused, moving on many levels, seizing upon the essence of a vast variety of experiences and objects for what they are in themselves, without, consciously or unconsciously, seeking to fit them into, or exclude them from, any one unchanging, all embracing, sometimes self–contradictory and incomplete, at times fanatical, unitary inner vision. The first kind of intellectual and artistic personality belongs to the hedgehogs, the second to the foxes; and without insisting on a rigid classification, we may, without too much fear of contradiction, say that, in this sense, Dante belongs to the first category, Shakespeare to the second; Plato, Lucretius, Pascal, Hegel, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Ibsen, Proust are, in varying degrees, hedgehogs; Herodotus, Aristotle, Montaigne, Erasmus, Molière, Goethe, Pushkin, Balzac, Joyce are foxes."

(Isaiah Berlin)

Isaiah Berlin, 1953. The Hedgehog and the Fox: An Essay on Tolstoy's View of History UK: Phoenix, 978–0–75380–867–2

TAGS

ad-hoc • Aleksandr Pushkin • Archilochus • AristotleBlaise Pascal • centrifugal • centripetal • Dante Alighieri • de facto • Desiderius Erasmus • fox • Friedrich Nietzsche • Fyodor DostoyevskyGeorg Hegel • hedgehog • Henrik Ibsen • Herodotus • Honoré de Balzac • Isaiah Berlin • James JoyceJean-Baptiste PoquelinJohann Wolfgang von GoetheLeo Tolstoy • Lucretius • Marcel Proust • Michel de Montaigne • Molière • Platopolymathsingle-mindedWilliam Shakespeare

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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