Not Signed-In
Which clippings match 'Everyday' keyword pg.1 of 5
06 OCTOBER 2012

A social mirror to the prevalence of casual homophobia on Twitter

"This website is designed as a social mirror to show the prevalence of casual homophobia in our society. Words and phrases like 'faggot,' 'dyke,' 'no homo,' and 'so gay' are used casually in everyday language, despite promoting the continued alienation, isolation and – in some tragic cases – suicide of sexual and gender minority (LGBTQ) youth.

We no longer tolerate racist language, we're getting better at dealing with sexist language, but sadly we're still not actively addressing homophobic and transphobic language in our society.

Let's put an end to casual homophobia. Speak out when you see or hear homophobic or transphobic language from friends, at school,

in the locker room, at work or online. Use #NoHomophobes to show your support. And visit one of our resource websites to get more involved."

(NoHomophobes.com)

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TAGS

#NoHomophobes • alienationcasual discrimination • casual expression • casual homophobia • casual reference • critiquecultural signalsdata analysisdykeeveryday • everyday language • faggotgay • gender minority • homo • homophobia • homophobic language • information designintoleranceisolation • LGBTQ • locker room • metrics • minority • mirror • no homo • NoHomophobes • racist languagerepresentationsentiment analysissexist language • sexual minority • so gay • social activismsocial changesocial commentsocial differentiation • social mirror • social normssocial responsibilitysuicide • transphobic • transphobic language • TwitterTwitter streamwords and phrasesyouth

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
22 JULY 2012

Fountain: an ordinary article of life without useful significance

"Fountain is one of Duchamp's most famous works and is widely seen as an icon of twentieth–century art. The original, which is now lost, consisted of a standard urinal, laid flat on its back rather than upright in its usual position, and signed 'R. Mutt 1917'. The Tate's work is a 1964 replica and is made from glazed earthenware painted to resemble the original porcelain. The signature is reproduced in black paint. Fountain is an example of what Duchamp called a 'readymade', an ordinary manufactured object designated by the artist as a work of art. It epitomises the assault on convention and good taste for which he and the Dada movement are best known.

The idea of designating such a lowly object as a work of art came from a discussion between Duchamp and his American friends the collector Walter Arensburg and the artist Joseph Stella. Following this conversation, Duchamp bought an urinal from a plumbers' merchants, and submitted it to an exhibition organised by the Society of Independent Artists. The Board of Directors, who were bound by the constitution of the Society to accept all members' submissions, took exception to the Fountain and refused to exhibit it. Duchamp and Arensburg, who were both on the Board, resigned immediately in protest. An article published at the time, which is thought to have been written by Duchamp, claimed, 'Mr Mutt's fountain is not immoral, that is absurd, no more than a bathtub is immoral. It is a fixture that you see every day in plumbers' shop windows. Whether Mr Mutt with his own hands made the fountain has no importance. He CHOSE it. He took an ordinary article of life, placed it so that its useful significance disappeared under the new title and point of view – created a new thought for that object.' ('The Richard Mutt Case', The Blind Man, New York, no.2, May 1917, p.5.)"

(Sophie Howarth, April 2000)

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1917196420th centuryabsurdAlfred Stieglitzartart historyassault • assault on convention • assault on good taste • avant-garde • black paint • contextconventioncultural signalscultural significance of objectscurationDadaDada movement • designated by the artist • everydayexhibition • fixture • Fountain (work of art) • glazed earthenware • good taste • icon of twentieth-century art • immoral • information in context • Joseph Stella • layers of meaning • lowly object • Marcel Duchampmodern artobjet trouve • ordinary article of life • ordinary manufactured objectporcelain • R. Mutt 1917 • readymadereplica • Society of Independent Artists • Tate Modern • took exception • twentieth-century art • urinaluseful significance • Walter Arensburg • work of art

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
15 JULY 2012

The Cut Up Collective and their Cut Up Machine

"The Moustache Foundation is proud to present for its inaugural exhibition, CutUp Machine, a series of new works by the collective CutUp.

CutUp are an autonomous group linked by a shared desire to reorder the urban landscape through intervention and play. Incorporating film, collage and installation, CutUp's practice focuses largely on the creative potential of the street as a site for interventionist art and disruption.

Interested in the spaces of misinformation and miscommunication inherent in the everyday, CutUp aim to introduce disorder into daily existence by interrupting and re–appropriating established visual forms. Occurring both inside and outside the gallery, CutUp's billboard and bus stop works are created by slicing up an advert and reassembling the pieces into a newly ordered image."

(Jaguar Shoes Collective, 4 November 2005)

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TAGS

2005advertising • art collective • arts collective • autonomous group • billboardbus shelters • bus stop works • collagecut-up techniqueCutUp (collective) • CutUp Machine • daily existence • disorderdisruptionestablished visual formseveryday • exploring creative potential • inside the gallery • installation artinterruptingintervention and playinterventionist art • interventionist art and disruption • Jaguar Shoes Collective • landscape • miscommunication • misinformation • Moustache Foundation • new worksnewly ordered imageordering • outside the gallery • pattern • pieces • pixel • re-appropriating • reassembling • reorder the urban landscape • seriessignageslicedsliced-up billboardsslicing upspacesstreet • the street • UKurban landscapevisual artvisual spectacle

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
07 MAY 2012

Folding Plug System: redesigning the UK 3-pin plug

"'Mac book Air,' Apple's latest master–piece, is the world's thinnest laptop ever. However, here in the U.K, we still use the world's biggest three–pin plug. Most people carry laptops with adapters and plugs because laptop batteries have limitations on the time they can be used. When people carry laptops with U.K plugs in a bag, it always causes problems such as tearing paper, scratching laptop surfaces and, sometimes, it breaks other stuff. The main problem is the UK standard 3–pin plug is not considered in the process of designing for mobility. My intention of the project was directed to make the plug as slim as possible and follow the British Standard regulation at the same time."

(Min–Kyu Choi, 20 April 2009, http://www.minkyu.co.uk/Site/Product/Entries/2009/4/20_Folding_Plug_System.html)

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19462009 • AC • AC power plugadaptersApple • Apple MacBook Air • British Standard • compact • designdesign innovation • designing for mobility • engineering regulationa • everyday • everyday product • folded plugs • foldingindustrial designinnovationinnovative designlaptoplaptops • MacBook Air • mains plug • Min-Kyu Choiminiaturisation • multi-plug adaptor • plug • power cord • power lead • power plug • power plugs • productproduct designredesignredesigningRoyal College of Art • slim • slimline • smart design • space saver • standard plug • standard UK plug • three-pin plug • UK • UK standard • UK standard 3-pin plug • wafer thin

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
03 MAY 2012

Aleks Krotoski's The Digital Human

"Aleks Krotoski asks not just what technology can do for us but also what is it doing to us and the world we're creating? Each week she takes us on a journey to where people are living their digital lives to explore how technology touches everything we do both on and offline.

Taking broad themes of modern living as a starting point she charts the experiences of homo digitas; both the remarkable and the mundane, to understand how we are changing just as quickly as the advances in our technology.

What does the deluge of images from digital photography mean for our memory when every second is being recorded, edited and posted online for posterity? Are the identities we create in social media no more than exercises in personal branding, to be managed and protected like any other product? And as traditional churches struggle to leverage technology to spread their faith do the behaviours we all display online have more in common with religion than rationality?

The time for wonder at the digital world is over, we live with it in every day. The question really is who are we now because of it?"

(BBC Radio 4)

Fig.1 "Mack on a summer morning", 30 March 2011 [http://www.mydogearedpages.com/2011/03/photographic–memories.html].

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TAGS

2012advances in technology • Aleks Krotoski • BBC Radio 4 • being edited • constructed identitiescultural identitycyberpsychology • deluge of images • digital photography • digital world is over • display online • every second is being recorded • everydayfaith • homo digitas • human behaviouridentityidentity performanceimpression management • leverage technology • living digital livesmediated environmentsmemorymodern livingnew technologyonline and offlineour digital livespersonal branding • posted online • posterityrationalityreligionself-monitoringself-reflexivitysocial changesocial mediasocial media identitiestechnology touches everythingvirtual presence

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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