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Which clippings match 'Wearable Technologies' keyword pg.1 of 1
21 JUNE 2015

The Next Black: a film about the future of clothing

"People say that fashion moves faster and faster. More colours, more collections, more brands, more styles. But in reality the clothing industry has been crawling, in terms of innovation, for the last hundred years. Up until now. For the first time in history, the concept of clothing is about to change. And it’s our mission to explore it.

This film is not about the new, it’s about the next. Will mass consumption of clothing continue to escalate? Or will we return to creating quality and caring about what we wear?

Will the future be centred around smart clothing and new technologies? Or will we find innovation within organic and traditional methods? We meet with some of the world’s most progressive people in search of the answers.

The Next Black is produced by home appliance manufacturer AEG, with the goal to anticipate future washing needs and contribute in making the clothing industry more sustainable."

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TAGS

20143D printingAdidas • AEG • Arcade Fireart of recycling • Biocouture Ltd • Black Eyed Peas • climate change • clothes dye • clothing and accessories • clothing design • clothing industry • clothing technologyCoco Chanelcorporate responsibilitycutting-edge innovations • cutting-edge technology • design engineeringdesign responsibilitydocumentary filmdye • dye chemicals • environmental initiatives • fashion future • fashion industry • fashion meets technology • fashion techology • fast fashion • future of clothing • heroes of sustainability • House of Radon • incentivising recycling • individual responsibilityinnovative companies • Lady Gaga • laundry care • manufacturing industries • Matt Hymers • MiCoach Team Elite • Nancy Tilbury • new technologies • organic materials • Patagonia • performance tracking • physiological • real-time data • Rick Ridgeway • slow fashion • smart designsmart materials • Sophie Mather • speculative fashion • sportswear manufacturing • sportwear design • Studio XO • sustainable companies • sustainable consumptionsustainable fashionsustainable future • sustainable practices • Suzanne Lee • Team Elite System • textiles industry • The Next Black (2014) • wearable technologies • woven sensors • woven textiles • Yeh Group

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
30 MAY 2014

Digital Revolution: an immersive exhibition of art, design, film, music and videogames

Exhibition: Digital Revolution at The Barbican Centre, London from 3rd July – 14th September 2014.

"Digital Revolution is the most comprehensive presentation of digital creativity ever to be staged in the UK. This immersive and interactive exhibition brings together for the first time a range of artists, filmmakers, architects, designers, musicians and game developers, all pushing the boundaries of their fields using digital media. It also looks at the dynamic developments in the areas of creative coding and DIY culture and the exciting creative possibilities offered by augmented reality, artificial intelligence, wearable technologies and 3–D printing.

Contribute to new commissions including Google's DevArt, an installation by global music artist and entrepreneur will.i.am and artist Yuri Suzuki and works by artists Umbrellium, Universal Everything, Seeper and Susan Kare (Mac Paint designer). Experience Oscar–winning visual effects behind Christopher Nolan's Inception and Tim Webber's Gravity, or go back in time to play classic videogames like Pacman and Space Invaders."

Chris Milk The Treachery of Sanctuary, 2012 The Creators Project, a partnership with Intel and VICE photography by Bryan Derballa.

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CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
11 OCTOBER 2009

Charmed: A Case Study of Interactive Jewellery

Hazel White's "work investigates how interactive jewellery can be integrated into our lives. Whilst most studies into wearable technology have focussed on how the technology can be miniaturised, the Charmed project looks into what exactly it is that users want from this technology – from storytelling to transportation devices to whatever else they may think of – and how it can be incorporated into users' everyday wardrobes in a way that allows an emotional involvement of the sort we might associate with 'ordinary' jewellery.

In order to address the question, Hazel has developed a series of 'charm' jewellery incorporating bracelets, necklaces, pins, or even keyrings. The charms were then given to a variety of different participants – from technophobes to technophiles, and from jewellery wearers to non–wearers – along with a pack that allowed them to log their responses. The participants themselves were allowed to choose the type of jewellery they received and how it would be worn, leading to a greater engagement with the pack and the project.

Through interviews with the applicants, Hazel was able to demonstrate that a user centred approach – working closely with the people who would wear the jewellery and responding and adapting according to their observations, values and needs – can lead to suggestions for interactive jewellery which can be experienced on multiple levels: from cultural, social and personal resonances to the narrative carried by the object and the physical interaction with the jewellery."

(AHRC, UK)

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TAGS

AHRCbraceletcalm technologycase study • Charmed • creative practicedecorative artsdesigndevice • Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art • emotional involvementenquiryexperimentationfashionform • Hazel White • industrial designinteraction • interactive jewellery • jewellery • keyring • narrative • necklace • objectproduct designresearch • technophile • technophobe • theory buildingUKUniversity of Dundeeusability • user centred approach • user-centredwearable technologies

CONTRIBUTOR

Simon Perkins
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